King Tut’s Fireball

DATELINE:  Dots Around History?

fireball

If you want to connect the dots of Schumacher-Levy comets hitting Jupiter, the first atomic bomb in New Mexico, King Tut’s jewels, the Great Siberian Explosion of 1908, and turning southwest at the pyramids, you ought to tune in to this documentary: The Fireball of King Tutenkhamun.           

 Three experts—one from Egypt, one from the United States, and one from Vienna—travel to the remotest part of Egypt looking for a debris field where the lime glass objects litter a thousand miles.

It seems the scarab on King Tut’s tomb was carved, not from a jewel, but from some strange extraterrestrial rock.

And, the area is strewn with these objects all over the ground for easy pickings.

The area was underwater until a few thousand years ago, which is hard to believe when you look at the vast and beautiful sand dunes without any life. These rocks may have been spread about from water flow!

The scientists also believe these gorgeous glass items came from a meteor, which is not good news. There is no crater, meaning the explosion of a meteor over Egypt hundreds of thousands of years ago was a devastating mid-air blow up.

These rubble piles can exterminate anything near them. If they are big enough, we don’t stand a chance. Could these scientists be wrong?

Well, the American walks around the desert barefoot, which loses credibility here. If you ever walked hot sand on a beach, you know the bad idea it is. It’s like not coming in out of the rain.

Yet, the documentary is compelling and fascinating, despite the foibles of the scientists. Watch the skies.