Titanic/James Cameron 2020 Vision

DATELINE:  More Underwater Pix

Titanic: Into the Heart of the Wreck  is another new documentary on History Channel that gives us the lowdown on how the shipwreck is melting away in those frigid depths, owing to an iron-eating microbe.

What an ignominious end to a grand liner.

There is a history of underwater diving, photography and subs, which calmed down the divining rods.

James Cameron was the star of this documentary, the primary witness, though one Russian oceanographer has done 57 dives to the wreckage. A handful of people have gone to it many, many times.

James Cameron admits he made the famous movie version because he wanted to dive on the ship—and has done so over 30 times.

Cameron mentioned that his camera was in D-deck D35, which was next to passenger Richard White’s compartment. He switched out of D-26 one day after they sailed because a room was empty and he preferred not to share with his father.

Cameron also mentions that he does not believe in ghosts, but the pairs of shoes indicate victims. He did not believe artifacts should be taken from the inside of the ship, though that now is debated and legally challenged.

As for seeing ghosts, Cameron disbelieves—except for an overlay of memory that he feels is present. He is no scientist, holds no science degrees, but he has had 30 trips to Titanic, ahead of legit scientists.

This is similar to the electrons never die theory of Thomas Edison who felt traumatic memory was far more likely to survive as electrons in the atmosphere.

Nothing is discussed of the recent efforts to retrieve the Marconi radio. And, experts now believe the ship may last up to 500 years underwater, despite 27 forms of bacteria eating it.