Roswell, Part Three, End All

Marcel’s Wreckage from UFO

DATELINE: New Info on Roswell

The results of History’s Greatest Mysteries  may be the least disappointing of a well-produced series. You can’t have a steal of home base on every episode, but the show has taken the safe road nearly every time.

The Roswell investigation has uncovered some disturbing testimony that contradicts government coverups of 70 years, now by grandchildren of the original witnesses. If you add new technology into the mix as a means of corroborating, you have a new case.

If there is anything to be claimed, it is that your U.S. government cannot be trusted.

Researcher Ben Smith starts with a 1981 taped interview with a college journalist who became Dr. Linda Corley who managed to extract more info from Major Jesse Marcel:  the marks were written on a block of wood (or something like wood) in a Tyrolean Note form of ancient writing.

When apprised of this, he backed off: someone came and threatened him from an unknown agency. Men in black?

His notebook was written by a colleague who had a home-made code, nearly impossible to break. Marcel did begin to reveal more and more as the 1980s came, shortly before his death. He may even have kept some artifacts to prove his case, but they are now “lost.”

Another officer not interviewed previously told his relatives that he was in charge of destroying files. He may have written the memo book. His name was Patrick Saunders, and now another name is added to the registry of fame.

If you want that smoking gun, it isn’t here. Nothing is definitive, but everything is suggestive. Key information is being withheld, but we do hear that U.S. military radar used some kind of ray to shoot down UFOs, about six in a year in New Mexico in the late 1940s. So, the flying saucers were not smashed up because of bad drivers.

We could only think of Nikola Tesla and his death ray.

 

Roswell & History Channel

Jesse Marcel 1947, 1980.

 DATELINE: New Evidence Forthcoming?

With its Cadillac history investigation series with Laurence Fishburne, we had little hope for more than another cover-up with their new program. All the past shows have ignored and distorted enough evidence to support traditional and conventional theories that we don’t expect much.

The episode, however, has promise—as they have been contacted by the grandchildren of the  first government official to visit the crash site. They have their grandfather’s journal from that era.

Major Jesse Marcel found odd wreckage covering a large desolate area—and for years he stayed quiet when the material he discovered was exchanged for debris from a weather balloon. He was incensed at being so used—and in 1980, shortly before he died, gave an interview to Leonard Nimoy’s In Search of TV series.

The former CIA researcher has to authenticate the journal, which is gibberish (in code?) and in different styles of handwriting (to mask identity?). Or, was there a second writer?

We immediately suspected Marcel’s pre-pubescent son took the journal and was writing in it, innocently and apart from the crash controversy.

However, we first notice that the TV show re-enactor for Major Marcel has the uniform of a corporal. So much for care to accuracy.

The investigation at the site includes drones, radiation measurements, and ground-penetrating radar. Soil samples will date when some heat-related activity occurred in this remote area.

Ben Smith, lead investigator, discovers there is much protection of privacy from children and grandchildren of witnesses. Mac Brazel, the rancher who found the debris, has an elderly grandson who also is reclusive but reveals what he knows.

The journal is genuine, according to the expert, and the second part of this fascinating study is forthcoming. There is only one writer, despite the odd change in handwriting. Everyone suspects it is in code.

 

 

 

 

Roswell UFO Conspiracy Unlocked

Philip Mantle

DATELINE:  Not again?

Good heavens, not another Roswell saucer crash history? This has just been released as an hour-long documentary of 2020. Can there be anything new here? We were held in place because this looked like a high-quality and stylish film, well-produced.

It became somewhat worse after the first half that went over fairly worn ground. It used some interviews with notable people from the case, Dr. Jesse Marcel, Jr. and Frankie Rowe, two young people in 1947 who have since died.

Their participation is noted by main narrator Philip Mantle, a British UFO expert and investigator for 40 years or more. He is straight-forward and pleasant enough. His perspective is the mainstay of the movie.

The worse part becomes the second half that is a new, kind of apology for the alien autopsy movie that has long been debunked as fake.

Ray Santilli, its producer, is an associate of Mantle who seems to think he is Mickey ready to hit a home run for revealing some new info on the 1993 phony and grotesque autopsy on some hideous little person who looks pregnant.

Mantle comes across as a dedicated and sincere researcher who has dedicated his life to solving a mystery and feels that one theory is that there was an original autopsy film from the 1947 era, whether faked by the CIA or real that resembled the fictional recreation done in a style that would never have passed muster in a World War II military.

Something may still be out there that has confused witnesses of the original and the fake that seems like new footage from the original.

This odd film does enough to raise again the ugly specter of the alien autopsy being real, just not the one you’ve seen on TV and Internet.

 

 

 

 

 

To Believe or To Investigate?

DATELINE: I Want to Believe! 

 Nicks Redfern & Pope

The documentary with the worst title so far this year is I Want to Believe! 

What a pity because it actually might attract more viewers with a better title. Of course, the opening credits undermine it further when the production company is misspelled as “Prodruction.”  Sloppy filmmakers.

Once the film starts, you realize that it is giving us some of the better Ancient Aliensexperts in a different light. Yes, there are our personal favorites Nick Pope, Nick Redburn, and Mike Bara. They are the true stars of this picture—and they dominate the interviews, though a few other lesser knowns offer opinions.

These three usually offer sound-bite one-sentence comments on a specific topic on Ancient Aliens.Here they are allowed to open up—and even explain a bit of their personal history and why they went into this crypto-journalism field of UFOs.

Make no mistake, they do think of themselves not as believers, but as investigators with an open mind.

The term UFO is widely disparaged as it is meaningless since anything unknown in the sky is a UFO. They also tend to respect “professional” witnesses over “abductees” because expertise carries some weight in their investigations. Bara disputes this and thinks the Travis Walton case is highly compelling because six witnesses passed multiple lie detector tests.

As theorists, they tend to lump all paranormal into one or two categories: either governmental disinformation for political motives, or the more interesting—interdimensional beings. Here, whatever culture you find, whether ghosts, orbs, little gray men, a Bigfoot. It is from a time-travel source in our past or parallel universe.

They do not dismiss the idea that an ancient civilization, now long gone on Earth, went to the Moon or Mars, and then eons ago came to an end. Their remnants may be our visitors.

We tend to agree that interdimensional explanations work best to include spirits who may have connections to ordinary people today whom they visit in one form or another.

As an adjunct to Ancient Aliens, we thought this was a more comprehensive consideration, with more attention to details than a fly in the ointment.

Blue Book Tells Truth, or It’s Out There

DATELINE: Dem Bones?

 

When your typical fictional show about Roswell promises to tell you the truth, you better line up for the sales slip for your ownership of the Brooklyn Bridge. Project Blue Book is giving the business in the second part of a two-part revelation about Roswell’s 1947 crash.

To do so, you must return with us now to six years later.

Yes, the truth is out there—shamelessly taking their nod from the X-Files, or is that now Shatner’s UnXplained files?

When you have one man staging elaborate charades, like putting a large flying saucer in the middle of town as a gag that no one sees, your credibility may already have taken a hit from the Phaser Gun on stun.

The credibility is sorely tested when Air Force personnel waterboard American citizens not under arrest. And, there is footage of an alien autopsy that has been debunked in recent years, but here it is merely a device to restore the abiding friendship between the two stars (Malarkey and Gillen).

With the lid back on Roswell, the military thinks they have bought at least ten more years before the American public is ready for balderdash. Of course, we’re still not ready for alien bones dug up under a tree.

These weird little creatures are, it is explained, the cruel and sadistic work of Dr. Josef Mengele who has apparently switched his allegiance from Nazis to some other force.

To top it all off, our ramrod cutie hero (Mike Malarkey) is still the unwitting dupe of some kind of Commie pinko space alien agent. Oh, yes, it’s a beautiful woman.

A few more shows like this, and we will be done with Project Blue Book.

 

 

 

 

Project Blue Book, S2 Backtracks to Roswell

 DATELINE: More Malarkey! 

Since the veracity of the series means that the actual investigators of Project Blue Bookcame after Roswell by six years, there had to be a way to send them back.  Season 2 makes a start in that direction.

 

Aiden Gillen returns as the historical figure of Dr. Allen Hynek amid a bunch of fictional supporting names. Hynek was a major opponent of UFOs, but in this series he is the archangel of UFOlogists. Go figure.

Out of clever re-construction of history, however dubious in the entire science fiction genre, nothing is impossible. And, the impossible ties to the past are made. If you’re claiming a spaceship landed in Roswell, you can claim anything.

There is someone blackmailing the overzealous and fictional Gen. Harding (Neal McDonough in a bravura rotten villain role). He has made more enemies than a commie traitor facing the Un-American Activities Committee in the 1950s. The entire town of Roswell may be out to get him. His loyal aide, Captain Quinn (Michael Malarkey) is a ramrod cutie-pie who is starting to have doubts about his mission (not his sexuality).

Some kind of soap opera subplot continues with a Russian asset (or alien asset) now romancing Quinn on the side, after going after Dr. Hynek’s wife. Who said the 1950s were dull?

The show continues this season to be atmospheric and suggestive of the era: the names have been changed to protect someone. There is a great deal of cigarette smoking, swallows of whiskey straight, and pay phones on every corner.

The show suggests the government paid off many residents of Roswell with money, not necessarily with threats of death and maiming. We have again heroic Americans standing up to their corrupt government, however inaccurate that is.

In a two-part opener, we are back at Roswell where dead aliens may still lurk.