Oak Island Teases Again

Ersatz Gold

DATELINE:  Missing in Action 

If there is any major development in the 11thepisode of the season, it is that there is a reference to the likely deterioration of weather ahead. Yes, another season os summery digging is about over. The Curse of Oak Island may be one for the books.

What has emerged in the recent episode is a continued absence of major figures. There has been another week with no direct appearance of Marty and Alex Lagina, nor Peter Fornetti. It is about the length of time for a quarantine. They’d never tell you that detail.

 

The two doctors, Ian Spooner and Aaron Taylor, have taken up major roles as advisors again this week.

Most of the on-site work has been hosted by Rick Lagina and the supporting workers. Marty shows up in a later filmed narrative analysis.

A growing chorus of responders keep asking us about Dave Blankenship, but he is gone for good, bought out by the Laginas and sent packing.  Nor is cartographer Erin Helton mentioned this week.

We spend much time again in the boring down to 180 feet where splinters of wood should not be. There is talk (again) of being near the money pit, with Money Bags 1 and 2 giving approval to dig.

Gary Drayton again is central to the discoveries of the week: a mysterious gold colored knob from a chest of drawers. Gary contends it belonged to a ship’s captain, and there is nothing to disprove his usual insight.

He later discovers a large post buried in the swamp with two massive spikes. It is a dock for a major ship.

In your usual disappointing news, the serpent mound is dismissed finally as a rubble field. Yet, the night’s show has been eventful and interesting.

Another Day on Oak Island, Season 8

Swamp Thing

 DATELINE: When Nothing is Big 

Let’s cut to the chase and to what you really want to hear: No, no Erin Helton this week. Sorry, folks, though her mapping notions were verified again. That’s your Curse of Oak Island.

In the immortal, if not repetitive words of Robert Clothworthy, your narrator, another day begins on Oak Island with the usual suspects.  Dr. Ian Spooner and Rick Lagina are back at the swamp where Spooner directs the digging by backhoe by Billy to uncover a flat area road. We are puzzled by this as there seems to be nothing flat: three levels of stone placed deliberately.

The upshot is they need artifacts to date the construction timetable.

Gary Drayton is pivotal again, finding something called a plumb bob, which is an ancient tool to make sure you are digging level.

The biggest news comes via Craig Tester, not on the island this year, as Covid keeps him in Michigan, but through Zoom, he appears with news about the Serpent Mound.

The archaeologist Dr. Aaron  and his blond assistant Miriam are back at the table to hear that the nails and coal found at the mound are now carbon-dated to around 1350. That’s Templar time, folks.

More and more items are coming up with that date, indicating Oak Island was busy around the time the Templars were being hunted down.

The consensus came out that this was highly significant because it seems to outdo the Viking visitors with a mysterious purpose for work on Oak Island. Do we dare think Ark of the Convenant?

It’s a week when the smallest detail may be the biggest of the show’s history.

Bogged Down on Oak Island

Erin Helton

DATELINE: Erin Goes Wild

We haven’t seen quite a powerful reaction to a new member of the cast as has been given to Erin Helton, the new resident cartographer. Curse of Oak Island has a new big star.

Somebody has noticed, as she now makes a weekly appearance, and this time she was right at the top of the show with her theories being encouraged and appreciated by the Laginas—not your usual first reaction from them. Marty flatters her for having one of the “best minds.” Wow.

Some have asked if she is Rick’s new girlfriend, which is fairly amusing. Erin is young enough to be his daughter and smart enough to see what she’d be getting. In fact, ciphers are here specialty. She tells us that Zena’s Templar map has shown exactly where the treasure vault is.

More and more dating on the island discoveries is going deeper into the past. Seven weeks after finding that Chinese coin, they bring is a numismatist who tells them it is over 1000 years old. Speculation centers on that it was a lucky coin until someone lost it. But when were lucky coins popular, and where did you keep them? We doubt that Knights Templar had wallets or pockets.

Gary Drayton is still the best worker on the show—taking Peter Fornetti out and finding a wharf pin that he estimates is older than 1700 era.

Dr. Eric Taylor is now the on-site archaeologist and works on the Serpent Mound, putting it again, at least 1000 years ago. It is now becoming evident that Templar, or even pre-Templar treasure was placed on Oak Island.

For good measure, Erin Helton puts in a second appearance by telephone later in the show. That’s the power of stardom.

 

Another Smart Woman on Oak Island

Cartographer Erin

DATELINE: Cartographer Erin

So much for that dumb Fellowship of the Dig. They wouldn’t know what they have or where to look if it weren’t for the occasional drop-in woman scientist. The latest is named Erin Helton, and she is a cartographer with IT skills.

She has taken the 1397 map Rick Lagina found with the help of an elderly woman five years ago, Zena. She claimed it was drawn by the Templars of Oak Island. It contained many written site markers that can still correspond to the Island today, but several items are vague and unknown.

She has taken her computer skills to find east-west markers of great precision that correspond to the map. It even makes Marty Lagina sit up and take notice. She identifies the “anchors” on the map, heretofore a mystery. They may be located and could provide data to triangulate a Templar find.

When the key members of the group go out (Alex, Jack, Gary, and surveyor Steve) to find the stones, they are small and precisely where they ought to be.

It is Alex Lagina who draws a parallel to a Templar carving in Westford, MA, that is of a sailing ship, thought to be from 1347. He thinks there is a vague outline similar on another rock. If these are accurate, the team has found something of significance as markers of treasure.

Another smaller finding has Rick Lagina go out with Gary, usually a sign that something big may happen: they locate a hinge from what Gary calls a Victorian cabinet. We never doubt him, and we never need the so-called experts to arrive to confirm his insights.

Small findings, on the surface, may mean bigger news later.

 

 

Beyond Oak Island, Beyond Belief

Jean-Boy

DATELINE:  More Oak Island Spin-offs

 Well, here’s another Oak Island series with the Lagina Brothers. If there is one thing you can count on, they do not share the limelight or the revenue. Anyone could have hosted this new series, but no.

Beyond Oak Island, a Lagina production could have become more than a commercial for their hit series, the Curse of Oak Island.

No, the Lagina brothers are interested in making another series that is merely a commercial and advertising for their brand.

So, as useless as it is, each show will start with the Laginas in their “War Room,” setting up some other international search for treasure.

Another callow hotshot pays homage to the Lagina team and explains he is after one billion dollars in gold from the lost Jean Lafitte treasure. It makes Oak Island look like a pittance, though the Oak Island case has far more interesting historical implications, whether you are talking Knights Templar, or Ark of the Covenant, or Shakespeare’s manuscripts.

This new series will have a strong overdose of Lagina-itus. But, our mission is to stick with it so you don’t have to. When Lagina water boy Matty Blake shows up, late to the party, we know what we’re up against.

The story of Jean Lafitte is compelling, and he was a faithful ally of the United States during the War of 1812. Rather than run afoul of America, he moved his pirate operation to Galveston and disappeared from history with a cool billion in booty. Pirates are also celebrated here as multi-cultural, politically correct people. Hunh?

The show actually improves when it moves into history of pirates and away from the Laginas. Voice-over Robert Clotworthy is perfect here. Alas, one segment does not a series make. If you think they find silver ingots at the end of the hour, you are the audience they play to.

Oak Island Returns for S 8

Boys in Quarantine

DATELINE: Two Young Stars Out for Covid-19

 History Channel gave the new season 8  start of Curse of Oak Island one of their 2-hour special starts. That may be due to the fact that the principals were all trapped back in the USA, unable to reach Oak Island and the return of the hunt.

Yes, Covid-19 may have put a damper on the Lagina brothers and their participation in their own show. It became the “Remote Control” episode. Interestingly enough, none of the major stars (Marty, Alex, Rick, Jack Begley, or Craig Tester) could find their way out of Michigan. 

 Yet, the rest of the team assembled, most of them already on the Island and ready to work.  What does that tell us? Oh, yes, Gary Drayton too was not on the island, probably back home in Florida. But thanks to Zoom, the gang was all there for a teleconference.

Tom Nolan, who lives on the Island, admitted that cases were still somewhat rampant in Nova Scotia. And Blankenship was nowhere to be seen, after years of offering little to the show.

 A new face cropped up: archaeologist Dave MacInnes, 4G grandson of the young man who found the original Money Pit in 1798. Nice choice.

Inexplicable actions continued this season to start: nothing much changes on the show. The diver Mike Huntley suddenly is replaced by a big rig team to go looking for shiny gold objects in the C-1 tunnel where for years cameras spotted golden flashes.

 However, the new group featured butterflingers. The diver dropped the gold coin he dug out of the wall and it fell into the dark dregs. No one swore, or said any discouraging word. But, please.  That dive team did not return.

And their diver did not locate any of the gold seen on camera. It seemed almost inexcusable to drop the gold piece.

 

Finally, the Laginas were given permission to go to Canada under the proviso of a two-week quarantine.  Again, they were unnecessary for any success.

Shatner & Shakespeare on Oak Island

DATELINE: Shatner Returns to Treasure Hunt

 Cold Day in November!

We know how much everyone enjoyed William Shatner on Oak Island, but he must have also enjoyed it because he has come back for the final night of season 7.

His theory is worthy of the UnXplained,and we fully concur with him.

There is a fairly sharp start that indicates that Shakespeare may have been borderline literate: his father and mother were illiterate and only middle-class. His own education was fair, not royal and not comprehensive.

So, Shatner takes some relish in debunking the Bard and suggesting the real writer was a man with credentials, like Sir Francis Bacon, member of the Elizabethan court. There may even be several authors, as Shatner hints.

Cyphers in the original folio have intrigued researchers that there is something that matches Nolan’s Cross on Oak Island. In fact, Bacon was connected to Knights Templar through Rosiecrucians—and he may have known of the secret vaults on Oak Island—and chose to bury his Shakespeare originals there.

One can find that The Tempest may be confessional in terms of Bacon burying “my booke.”  If overlaid on the final page of The Tempest, you find a spot that would correspond to the Eye of the Swamp on the Island.

We were amused when Rick Lagina called Bacon the Michelangelo of his day: if history is correct, they were almost contemporaries as Michelangelo’s death crossed the date of Bacon’s birth. Technically, he was right.

Parchment was found over 160 feet below the earth. Bookbinding material was found near the Money Pit deep down.

Even the Laginas seemed intrigued that Shakespeare’s first folio is there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another Oak Island Season Baiting the Hook

 DATELINE: Y’all Come Back!

  Late Bobby Restall.

For Oak Island, winding up in its seventh season, we know the annual state we reach at this point:  it used to be called the “cliff-hanger,” but on Curse of Oak Island, it is baiting the hook for the next year.

They know how to grab us and make us come back again. You can start to count the little developments that are meant to give us hope.

Is the empty-hand something we can identify again? You cannot take much comfort from finding more bits of bookbinding leather. Whatever documents that were there, are now clearly shredded to nothing. How cynical we have become, left by years of dashed hopes.

We are now relying on the sonorous tones of Robert Clotworthy to keep our hopes high. A new geophysicist Jeremy Church has arrived with news. He has found a 13×13 foot shaft or teardrop in the Money Pit, deeper than expected.

A botanist comes to the swamp and finds that a tree stump there, Dr. Roger Evans takes samples but says it is cork oak, that is indigenous to Portugal, not Nova Scotia. Knights Templar versions from Portugal were likely in Canada.

Alex Lagina brings the two surviving Restall family members to the Island. Rick Restall recalls his older brother Bobby who lost his life at 18 in a shaft. It is poignant and perhaps the most evocative of the treasure hunt moments.

You can always count on Gary Drayton to make the biggest find and the greatest grab to our interest: another ancient pickaxe. They find enormous wooden dowels, highly powerful connective lumber which may have Roman numerals carved into them.

We learn again that Rick and Marty Lagina are always late to the show. They seem to drive up after everyone else is already there and working.

Yup, we are hooked for another year.

Ring-a-Ding on Oak Island

DATELINE: Empty Shaft

Rick Lagina compares their efforts to Winston Churchill’s “blood, sweat and tears,” as we draw to a close. Brit Gary Drayton is more akin to another ring-a-ding moment, as we find the season running out in Nova Scotia, and nary an Ark of the Covenant to be seen.

With the winter coming inevitably, they have now the biggest shaft ever.

The two who have found so much over the past few years, Gary Drayton and Rick Lagina come together for one last search of the swamp. These two are quite lucky in tandem: and there appears to be one last bit of luck in those metal detectors.

They find an elaborate ring, highly embossed, but without jewels. It has a flower or sunburst with some silver. One expert places it at pre-1730. They bring in a gemologist named Lewton-Brain. He finds two repairs to enlarge it. It is Spanish and likely belonged to a woman.

They also find part of a metal shield that was buried over 100 feet in 1936. Below this is likely original shaft.

Also coming out is large bit of human bone—and barrel casings! Something is so close that you know you will have to survive the coronavirus to see what occurs next season.

The bone is large and likely human. Why is a large human bone buried over 115 feet below the surface?

They even find a keg part. Yet, they hit bedrock and nothing. Yet again. They suspect it “shifted” through earth tremors or whatever. They once again are more ready to step back to think. They need to go back to Dan Blankenship’s office in his house (left to his daughter, now resident).

Next season looks like another fresh start to find Money Pit (if it isn’t simply a legend).

There is more talk now of history, not of treasure. These set-backs are bringing us to despair.

Oak Island’s Swampy Roots

DATELINE: Swamp Thing

Another discovery now puts the wood dated at 1741, decades before the original slipway and when no one was actuallyliving on Oak Island.

 

No loading docks were needed unles they were unloading and burying something on the island.

 

In 1741 a French fort may have moved a massive gold reserve to Oak Island to keep out of British hands.

 

A visit to Fort Louisbourg 300 miles from Oak Island shows tunnels, walls, and structures built by French engineers. The same work there and Oak Island matches. A 97 ship fleet, led by a descendant of the Knights Templar, went on a mission to Oak Island, but the entire operation failed. Nothing was recovered.

 

Gary Drayton goes out and finds a musketball, which confirms that military people were on the island. They also take in the beach exposed by Dorian. He finds a rigging axe that could be from the early 1700s.

 

Rick Lagina and Doug Crowell show up at the fort and are stunned by the size and complexity of the military outpost. They are particularly interested in the tunnel system. They find a stone drain system similar to the water flow at Smith’s Cove. It’s a French drain.

 

They also find counter-mines, networks of booby traps.

 

There are images of a cross shaped tunnel that mirrors Nolan cross.

 

The entire crew shows up at the swamp to find some unusual rock formations, manmade. The only absentee is Marty Lagina, and son Alex stands in.

 

Dr. Ian Spooner assesses it. He thinks it is a manipulated work area to off-load and hide evidence.

Hurricane Dorian: Not Quite Oak Island Waterloo

DATELINE: It Could be Worse

As we noted months ago, the direct hit on Oak Island by a large category 5 hurricane would effectively mean the end of the season.

As Marty Lagina opined with true fright, something bad was about to happen. They had just begun excavating the swamp with expensive equipment. They almost immediately found wooden carved pegs. These were similar to the ones found by Fred Nolan decades ago in the eenter of the swamp. It proved that the swamp was created before 1700.

By whom and why?

And now too the work at Smith’s Cove with the copper dam was also about to face flooding waters. The ocean levels have raised in centuries—and were now were going to reclaim the secrets.

Gary Drayton found some spikes that have been there for hundreds of years. Yet, Gary is disappointed that he did not find any coins or spoils from those builders. They were too too careful.

Digging for the Money Pit,  they found a tunnel that fed water into the treasure shaft. They feel they were near the original work spot and could be at the actual treasure site. It could all be for naught.

What this indicates is that there are two separate and distinct mysteries on the island. Two separate groups may have put treasure here in this remote and perfect spot.

They are discovering why so many previous hunters went broke in this endeavor. Millions of dollars could be wasted by these efforts and a natural disaster stopping them. Axe cut wood at 110 feet shows something completely new. It is darker and older than anything ever seen.

We are seeing Waterloo unfold before our hopes as historical discoveries emerge. Gary and Alex Lagina visit blacksmith historian Carmen Legg who gives them a date of 1600s for Gary’s latest findings.

Meanwhile, everything must be locked down in case winds over 150 mph hit within hours and with flooding. We were not shown the crew evacuating the island, which would have been real drama. Instead, we come back a day later–and a treasure short.

If you wonder about the notion of a curse at Oak Island, it is now unfolding with Dorian. The manmade causeway was severely damaged. Swamp needs to be re-drained. Yet, it’s not as bad as feared.

  Oak Island Pays Dividends for Fans!

DATELINE: Gob-Smacked by Gary Drayton

 Steve Guptill

At long last, not even bad delaying tactics of the show’s producers can stop the progress to something important. Long-suffering fans who have put up with endless recaps and repetitive reminders may now be able to see a mystery unfold.

Well, it’s not quite the same as having the UFO land on the White House lawn, but finding giant structures under a long-submerged bay area tells us that the rise in oceans has complicated the treasure hunt.

Young surveyor Steve Guptill has emerged this season from nowhere to be Rick Lagina’s right hand.  He is in on every discovery and has the complete trust and attention of Mr. Lagina. We are happy he has found a true companion with talent, beauty and brains. He has located the first tunnel made to avoid the flood drains in 1805.

Once again, members of the team find unusual features—and then Rick Lagina shows up. Yet Smith’s Cove now has giant logs, not smaller, meaning the engineering was overwhelmingly difficult. What were they doing hundreds of years ago?

The other big news is the Swamp. They may have found the Eye of the Swamp as the theoretical center of the treasure. Again, an art expert has used French paintings to reveal secret information—which makes Marty Lagina particularly cynical.

Expert Dr. Ian Spooner returns—and Steve Guptill is in charge of digging in the swamp eye, a coring operation to determine the swamp’s age.

Not to be undone, Gary Drayton finds a wooden peg or two at the cove. What we have here is massive structure made on a grand scale 1220 A.D. in Nova Scotia. Significant human activity is discovered in 1675 or so, as well.

We are now in the area of Knights Templar.

Bend in Smith’s Cove at Oak Island

DATELINE: New Discovery!

 What is it?

Two searches seem to be reaping rewards for the treasure hunters on Curse of Oak Island as the seventh episode of the seventh season airs. Another search is, as usual, highly speculative and a tease.

We finally receive word after a year that the stone located at a former bookstore from 1919 and thought to be the notorious 90foot stone with hieroglyphs written on it, was some kind of replica.

Once again, interesting info is simply withheld as a story fades away. Now Rick Lagina reveals there was nothing on that bookstore stone found in the old basement.

However, the family that owned the bookstore may have moved it to their ancestral home in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. There, buried under a rhododendron bush could be the stone. Why? No one can say, but permits will be gathered to dig.

Back on the island, there is a shortage of appearances by Marty and Alex Lagina. So, Rick has recruited his other nephew Peter Fornetti and Billy Gerhardt to do some travel and research (for no reason except to highlight their appearances).

On the west side of the island, usually not explored, Gary Drayton and Jack Begley start to locate what seems to be an ancient wharf. Spikes, pins, and nails, indicate a structure from pre-1795 to unload or to repair ships was there.

At Smith’s Cove, the new 50 foot bump-out instantly reveals some kind of ancient box of logs (and tar paper) that predates any  record. It is under 10 feet of water usually, but the area may have been flooded since the oceans have risen in the past few hundred years.

It could be a booby trap flood tunnel, or something else. It is intriguing and indicates a growing number of historical possibilities. Something is indeed afoot.

Oak Island Specials Headline New Season

DATELINE: More of the Same Again!

 $ Cash Down Logo!

To whet your appetite for season seven of the Curse of Oak Island, the series is beginning the season with early-bird specials. Fans cannot get enough of the Lagina Brothers and their motley crew of treasure hunters.

Tonight is a count-down of the group’s accomplishments over the past six seasons. And, you better believe they give credit to no one except themselves.

What have we got here? Well, it’s the same old wine in a semi-recycled bottle. Yes, the clever producers of the show have found yet another way to repeat, ad nauseum, the same events we have seen repeatedly, over six seasons.

Never let it be said that the Lagina brothers don’t know how to beat a dead horse. This is marketing at its most brazen. By packing the two-hours in the guise of a count-down, you have a way to introduce the show to new viewers. And, if you are an old hand, you should avoid these two hours, lest you are bored, bed-ridden, and/or your remote control is broken.

What’s more, the ever-irritating, fawning Matty Blake is your host, on the Lagina payroll.

To start, the show deals with 25 great discoveries over 220 years. So, you have to include all the historical data: like boys finding a hole and digging in pre-1800. You must include the reasons why Marty Lagina and Dan Blankenship had to move to Oak Island (after reading a Reader’s Digest article), and then you have to list the appearance of the Restall family, and on and on.

Forget those “bobby dazzlers” found by Gary Drayton. Those are at the end of the show.

What emerges of interest is the stuff the producers never think is interesting: like the fact that Oak Island is now a big tourist attraction, or that it has a money-making museum with unusual artifacts (TV props included).

You see throngs of tourists being led by some of the TV show personalities in walk-arounds. You begin then to see the mammoth scale of this money-maker for History Channel, and the Lagina family.

There is never a discussion of cost of security, or other requirements to protect the island. It must be steep: Oak Island is no longer a forgotten speck off the coast of Nova Scotia. You are looking at a Grand Canyon of Mysterious Tourist Traps.

 

 

Dorian to Visit Oak Island

 Trump Can’t Find Nova Scotia on US Map!

DATELINE: Hurricane Dorian On Schedule to Hit Oak Island!

 Expect a special episode of Drilling Down on Oak Island, and additional footage on Curse of Oak Island when the series begins in November.

With all the celebrity visitors to the treasure hunting Lagina brothers, it seems only natural that in their seventh season they become interrupted by an unwanted visitor. A storm is brewing out in the Atlantic, west of Greenland.

Yes, tourism is a big business on the little island, and they are making the most of it with the TV series inspiring a renewed interest in the Nova Scotia properties. It’s just a skip and hop from New England to drive up there.

Property values have never been higher, and with Americans ready to bail out on a crypto-Nazi takeover of the government, you may find that a couple of small islands are paradise. After all, during the American Revolution, the colonists spent time there.

Unlike today’s tourists, Dorian is going by sea. A direct hit. Put two lanterns in Rick Lagina’s steeple. We heard that Trump wants to send a crew to help with any cleanup—because he thinks Nova Scotia is part of Greenland.

Down from his Cat 5 angry self, the hurricane now denuded into a tropical storm will stay out in the North Atlantic, passing over the area where Titanic rests two miles below the ocean, unfazed by the churning waves above, and the storm will lash out at Alex Lagina and Gary Drayton if they haven’t gone back to Michigan looking for gold bricks under the lake.

The Laginas have run out of places to dig by now, and they have tackled draining the swamp, but are keeping their boggy findings to themselves, lest it hurt the ratings. However, if Dorian dumps another five or ten inches of water into the swamp, it may be a hopeless delay resulting in another season of tedious pumping out of the area.

There is a ship down there in the muck, perhaps about as rotten from wood eating bacteria as the Titanic is from metal-eating bacteria.

Of course, gold coins cannot be eaten by bacteria, if ever there were any treasure to begin with. After all, why build an elaborate tunnel system if you’re leaving the treasure in a sunken ship in a swamp?