Deeply Boring on Oak Island

1st Appearance of Dr. Christa This Season

DATELINE: Boring Deeper

One friend who tunes into Curse of Oak Island  on a now-and-then basis claims that she never knows it’s a new episode. It seems every week they find an old coin and are boring into the ground looking for a new entrance to the Money Pit.

We’re glad she didn’t tune in to this show tonight. It’s more déjà vu than we can handle.

The eighth show of the eighth season is notable for who’s not there. Marty Lagina is on Zoom and not even on the island, and his son Alex doesn’t show up until he fills an empty seat in the final sequence. Peter Fornetti is nowhere. You won’t find Dr. Erin Helton either.

However, a couple of notable faces do come on board. First, making his initial island appearance is Mr. Moneybags, Craig Tester. He is the bank of Oak Island, and then at the end of the show, we have our first appearance of one of our perennial favorites, Dr. Christa Brousseau. We add Drs. Spooner and Aaron Taylor to the mix.

She has the most intriguing info of all:  she notes that two rose-head nails from different locations, one in the newly discovered serpent mound and another from a tunnel are the same, made at the same time. That connects the dots.

Once again, Gary Drayton is also on site as they uncover some kind of road out of the swamp, leading up to the pit areas. He finds another coin, likely from the late 1600s.

There are no additional confirmations of Templar work at the serpent mound from 1400, which is the most exciting part of this season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What? Another Week of Season Seven?

DATELINE: Deadend Kids?

 Ball’s Tunnel?

It’s like lingering on a deathbed. Yet, here we are with another weekly survival on Curse of Oak Island. We are hanging on by a dendro count by our fingernails. Even Alex Lagina is starting to look shopworn, even with his filthy millions and clean hands.

Mother of Mercy, is there no one who will rid us of this meddlesome priest? Oh, wait, that’s another series altogether. If this continues, we think Gary Drayton will begin seeing the ghost of Hamlet’s father on the ramparts.

He does find a crowbar in what seems to be the true Money Pit. Legge thinks it is an anchor or pulley. He always impresses Alex. Gary realizes he needs a bigger metal detector.

Every time Carmen Legge says “1700” we begin to think it is a glitch on the audio. So, he shocks them by saying, “Middle Ages.”

At 120 feet below, there is again more coconut fiber. They also locate a metal shield that was used in 1931—not exactly the original diggers. But it does indicate that they have reached the end of searcher efforts.

Next should be original buried stuff. However, at this point, the crane pressure brace has broken. It’s a setback as the season comes to a finish. It does mean something is there causing the grinder to be blocked. But they are so desperate they are working into thedarkness.

This forces them to turn to excavating the home of a man who was once a slave but ended up super-wealthy. Samuel Ball had something tunneling under his house. Samuel Ball’s lot may have been over a much older vault. Something big may be apparent because Alex shows up and a camera is snaked deep into the tunnel.

Surely Templar on Oak Island

DATELINE: Coconut Fiber 

Ship in Swamp.

If you are among the faithful, your belief in Templars, treasures, and miraculous artifacts, may be about to be rewarded big time.

The show itself has begun to ask if the search is worth it. Yet, there is a major structure or more on the island. Both the Money Pit and Smith’s Cove are showing to be rich in evidence. The thinking finally is that the ocean was much lower at Smith’s Cove that made it easier to build giant structures that had no nails or fasteners.

The eye of the swamp may be pivotal. They think a major discovery of a Spanish galleon may be their reward. The possible ship is about 15 feet at the shallow end and over 50 feet at the other end. Ground penetrating radar presented an image.

Marty arranges to dig a major shaft into the Money Pit where wood has been found that is from 1620. They can do a safe dig eight feet across and 120 feet deep.

On another front, the Scottish immigrants came to Oak Island and wanted to use a prebuilt system to hide their Templar artifacts. They may have created the newer Money Pit. These Templars, aka Knights Baronet, were freemasons. In fact, many of the searchers were actually Masons.

It may be the original discoverers of the Money Pit were actually came with some knowledge of treasure. They knew what was there and why they went down over 30 feet.

Even more shocking, they discover an opening to a tunnel under the foundation of early resident Daniel McGinnis. Direct descendants several years earlier claimed there were treasure chests the original teen treasure hunter located. Back at Smith Cove, Gary Drayton jokes about a tunnel—but then they find one. It contains more coconut fiber—or something else! If that material is fiber, it could mean it is near the booby traps.

They return again to Carmen Legge, now a regular deliverer of amazing findings. He identifies this pipe pole as a boat hook.

However, the biggest news of the night has to do with the mystery fiber discovered in a strange new place. It turns out to be a shock from Dr. Ian Spooner: it’s not human hair. More coconut fiber indicates a flood tunnel. It was a filter and original work for the placement of treasure.

Oak Island Box Out

DATELINE: Wait till Next Year

 Inexplicable Log Boxes

They now have evidence from science that material buried in the cove dates back to 1620, around the time of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. With the end of the season rapidly approaching, The Curse of Oak Islandhas more mysteries and fewer answers.

The original Money Pit shaft has wood dating back way before the original searching. How many people were on an uninhabited island doing this engineering? And why? We may have to tune into the UnXplained to hear what Shatner states.

At Smith’s Cove they have found a bizarre wooden log box. It was either meant to be part of the flood booby traps or to circumvent them. Their digging nearly destroys the box. It collapses. However, it was not tied to the drain systems.

They are off to the next spot: the swamp. There, Gary Drayton finds another hinge or bracket. It was a match to one found last year that blacksmith expert said was 400 years old.

When Alex and Marty show up at an area between the cove and Money Pit, it looks like a war zone of a no man’s land from the Western Front excavation. That is how much work has been done on this small island. Millions have been poured into this money pit.

They never expected to find another tunnel, well-constructed and with no historical record. They had discovered another massive building project on a small island. It leads to conclusions that define historical mysteries of Arks of the Covenant and Holy Grails.

Carmen Legge joined in to identify various metals that he placed around the mid-1700s.  Who was making those tunnels?  He found it amazing that tunnel tools were in a swamp (or maybe it was not a swamp). He finds the strapping is from a sailing ship. He felt it was a ship from as early as 1710. Gary thought it was from a pirate ship, and Legge said the metal was in a big fire.

We are realizing that another season will be required. They are nowhere close to revealing the truth. But it may be worth the wait.

  Did We Do This Before on Oak Island?

 DATELINE: It Only Feels Like a Rerun

Why do they keep drilling down when it is hit or miss? The Curse of Oak Island never really answers their alleged waste of money. They finally decide to do seismic testing.

The War Room gang entertain another historian, but this one is labeled a real expert by Marty Lagina: he is Chip Reid from Anapolis. He tells them the French likely built “water batteries” on Oak Island, which explains what the structures found in Smith Cove.

Reid, author and highly respected, tells them that there were several treasures dropped off over hundreds of years because secret Tempar knowledge shared the hiding spots for future protected items.

They also have another circus ring going on with GPR seismic imaging over at the original digger and discoverer, Daniel McGinnis whose ruins of a house are a national treasure. It now appears he had a secret cellar under the foundation.

They also refer to Dan Henskee as the new dean of the past and his information leads them to another spot that could direct the search to the Money Pit.

Oddly enough Henskee does not appear in the show. It is troubling about his health or condition.

As usual too, it is Gary Drayton who finds more stuff: this time he locates a chisel on the McGinnis land that indicates the original teenager who found the Money Pit was mining on his land back in 1800.

This was a holding pattern episode to set us up for something bigger and more shocking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of Oak Island Unearthed

 DATELINE: Recommended Book

You can bet your bottom of 10-X dollar that the Laginas would never have gone out to Oak Island if they had talked to John O. O’Brien when they were kids growing up in Michigan.

Marty would never have spent any of his filthy millions on buying up the property. They would not be interested in finding the tomb of Montezuma, nor would they believe he was in Canada. Who would?

Well, one enlightened author from Nova Scotia grew up with stories about the fabled treasure—and he has put the theories into a book, available online and in print. You can be sure that the Laginas have not read it.

John O’Brien appeared on the third season of Curse of Oak Island, one of many strange theories the show entertained—and ultimately dismissed. Mr. O’Brien was never asked back, and his theories were only half-inspected.

His book, called Oak Island Unearthed,is a thoughtful and personal recollection of a man who grew up near the legendary Oak Island. His career as a miner with insights into the science and technology of geology provides an interesting perspective.

You may have seen him treated rudely by Marty Lagina on their series, dismissing his ideas about how the Aztecs had the advanced knowledge to accomplish the feats at Oak Island. In fact, they performed much of the engineering in their own local Mexican territory.

What may seem incredible is that the Aztecs would travel to Nova Scotia for any purpose, let alone to hide the body of Montezuma. All of their travels have gained credibility since Aztec artifacts were found in Georgia!

Though the TV series picked up on the motif of corn in Scotland art work and architecture a century before it was introduced to Europe, the TV show did not give O’Brien credit for this notion, or the truly amazing detail that the Aztecs regarded blue clay as more valuable than gold.

In one scene of the TV show, they complain about all the strange blue clay on the island, never connecting it to the Aztecs who went all over North America in search of this ceremonial pigment.

The clues of corn and blue clay are compelling arguments. This is a book that is eye-opening and for those not blindly following the cursed TV series.

Mr. O’Brien’s book lays out the arguments in both technical and non-technical terms, giving a personal and conversational explanation to his lifelong beliefs.

He was denied a chance to explore the island by earlier owners, like Nolan and Blankenship. And, his final visit to Oak Island by the Lagina group was less than satisfying.

You will step back and re-consider some of his notions when you read this fascinating account of the presumed treasure.

Out, Out! Given Shaft on Oak Island

DATELINE: Void or Vortex?

void on Oak Island Money Pit Candid Camera?

When we learned this week that History Channel had ordered 30 hours of the series Curse of Oak Island for this sixth season, we knew immediately it meant the “slog” factor had been doubled.

This would be a mammoth and twice-as-long season of episodes than the previous year.

And, sure enough, we saw the drama in micro-management. It seems that the stone with “rune” markings would be emblematic of the problem. Alex Lagina found an English literature professor (a rare woman) to give expertise. She was resoundingly rejected by the Lagina Brothers.

She suggested, two weeks after finding a piece of stone, that they look for the rest of it. A half-hearted search commenced eventually, but Rick Lagina out in the field was not enthusiastic. Marty dismissed another expert when she said it was decorative, not language.

If there was a find, it was Gary Drayton—the metal detective—who located another Roman arrow shaft in the muck. It may take weeks to authenticate this.  And, we are still left wondering why no one has done carbon dating on the wood beams found in the mud at Smith’s Cove.

Now the gang of treasure hunters are calling it Roman era because some hydraulic concrete has been found. Well, yes, Romans created it, but it was rediscovered in the 1700s—and, more likely, might be from that era.

Most intriguing again was failed equipment. A highly anticipated submersible camera went down a shaft, found some angular caverns, and promptly crashed, filling with water.  Wasn’t this a submersible??

The Laginas are fond of blaming the perennial curse of Oak Island for equipment failures. However, if you are using paranormal theory (curse killing six men), then you ought to be aware that spirit activity often depletes electronic equipment, causing battery failure.

If you have a shaft/void that has human bones in it at 170 feet, you may well have paranormal activity. It has not been addressed so far.

All in all, this latest episode leaves viewers frustrated. Yet again.

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

Oak Island, 11th Episode & 11th Hour

DATELINE: Something’s Happening (we think).

alex front & center Alex, Poised for a Hostile Take Over!

Racing to the end of another and sixth season, The Curse of Oak Island takes time to call in a woman excavator who worked with the ROC equipment last year. Indeed, the Lagina brothers note that it has been a year since they actually dug in the shaft where the Money Pit is likely to be.

It’s a year since they found those two pieces of human bone! If that isn’t slow, we will put our money on the Hare racing against the Tortoise. They admit their hunt has been for “information” this season.

College professors may rejoice over this revelation. Others may not be so thrilled.

The show features Gary Drayton only for a few minutes this week, but he finds part of a lead bracelet that seems a companion piece to the lead Templar Cross he found last season.

Alex Lagina, looking more buff than usual, is once again driving miles to interview middle-aged women at museums in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. He does learn that the latest inscription may be a rune from the Vikings. However, even he as the brightest light in the Oak Island sky, throws cold water on the paralells. He is almost ready to steal the show from his father and uncle.

Still, he actually and half-heartedly digs in Smith’s Cove with Uncle Rick. More bizarre wood structures are under the mud: made for no discernible purpose, they are new discoveries and quite fascinating.

There are growing hints that this year’s big money throwaway will not show returns till next season. But, now we seem to have found evidence of Vikings and Ancient Romans on Oak Island, pre-dating the Knights Templar. It was apparently quite a tourist attraction in its ancient days.