Lost Gold Beneath the Gorilla Head

 DATELINE: 4th Episode of History Channel Series

marker Rock Gorilla Carving!

Continuing to be intriguing, Lost Gold of World War II has hit upon a modern, but dangerous, quest for lost treasure. Yamashita’s gold may have been secretly buried 75 years ago, but there are plenty of dangers today.

Like Oak Island, the treasure hunters are discovering plenty of potential flood gates and other dangers. We worry about them far more than other shows because these guys are all fat and old.

It occurred to us that they are not missing many meals. And, the latest one-shot expert is a diver from the American military thirty years ago. The search team leaders seem unable to find anyone except old soldiers who never die but put on big pot bellies.

These oldsters are scrambling up and down slippery rocks in humid weather—and it shows, thus giving us concerns that might not exist if these hunters were 25 years younger.

Their discovery of more markers carved into the overgrown jungle leaves proves that someone felt compelled to leave notations to tease treasure hunters.

In the meantime, back in California, Bingo has discovered one of the coins the team found was from 1980, but the other is clearly pre-1940.

One huge marker, a gorilla head, is carved beneath a waterfall, and it looks upon another smaller marker that designates treasure boxes. So, they take a chance to go down to the pool below.

Beneath that may be a cave entrance. Technology continues to save the day:  poles that emit sounds to indicate metal 18 feet below the surface—and pumps to empty out a pool in short time.

If events seem to be moving swiftly and with more results than on Oak Island, it’s true. Only if the show is renewed for another season will we reach the drag out levels of Oak Island.

So far, this is neatly paced and has us enthralled.

 

 

World War II Gold: Second Episode

DATELINE: Have Drone, Will Travel!

have drone, will travel

Money is no object when a trillion bucks worth of glorious stuff is reportedly hidden in caverns beneath a thick jungle. Only modern technology can save you from the “needle in a haystack,” end of good intentions.

This week on Lost Gold of World War II, we learn that the Japanese depositors of stolen loot used various tricks to booby-trap their cache. We heard about the sarin gas bottles last week, and this week we hear how they have made flood tunnels that will drown the gold seekers. Shades of Oak Island!

And, yes, other treasure hunters met their ignominious ends through this means.

Our American heroes are not so dumb. They have found a shaft dug only 20 years earlier, but hubris leads them to think there is a concrete cap inside that leads to a subway system. Wrong.

Their ability to maneuver through the Luzon jungles is impossible except for Lidar, which arrives from a drone that does a fly-over. As the expert drones on, he claims this is digital napalm: jungle leaves will disappear on the computer, revealing roads and caves.

Bingo Minerva, the researcher back in the States, confirms much of this. Yes, Bingo Minerva may be the smartest one not to go on this treasure hunt.

He does not face unrelenting humidity, insects, and booby traps.

Facial markers are the key under the leafy canopy. They must find a large gorilla head carved into rock under a waterfall. We wouldn’t make this up, and it is why we remain intrigued.

Finding petroglyphs (like a gorilla face behind a waterfall) is historical, but these treasure hunters attribute them to Japanese soldiers.  These war-mongers are members of the Golden Lily — part of a Niponese version of the Knights Templar, complete with symbolic codes and secret rituals.

We are eager for more to come.

 

Stolen Treasure in the Philippines!

DATELINE:  Sleeping Trillion Bucks

lost gold

More gold and art treasures hidden by a rapacious Japanese general? Yes, and this time it’s somewhere on an island in the Philippines where nutcases go hand-in-hand with gold-diggers. We did not see any Laginas associated with this History channel’s latest example of a series bit by the Goldbug.

The first episode is called “Death on the Mountain.”

The optimists at History Channel are calling this Season 1. Or, perhaps they are pessimists who expect multiple season frustrations. In any case, the betting is that we will have hit the mother-lode of ratings. So, gold in the logo is running downhill like lava.

General Yamashita of the Emperor’s army buried all kinds of goodies with booby traps that only American experts can discover and disarm. Well, if that isn’t hubris, then what motivates the diggers on Oak Island?

Ostensibly, there is a trillion dollars in modern terms of loot. In the first episode, they do find a tunnel and poison gas bottles ready to crack open with a feather’s touch. Previous treasure hunters unwittingly set these off and died.

The Lost Gold of World War II  has only been missing for 75 years or so, unlike the Oak Island treasure that clocks in at 200+ years. Yet, there is clear evidence that the Luzon treasure is priceless.

The hunters of loot are Americans of different generations and races, but lifelong seekers who seem to know about something most Americans never heard of. They insist Roosevelt, Truman, and Churchill, all knew about it, as does the CIA.

They locate a “witness” named Grandpa, for the obvious reason he is ancient. He is the parallel to the late Dan Blankenship of Oak Island: Grandpa is a witness who saw the activity as a boy in the 1940s. He points to dangerous expanse that might take ten seasons to traverse, which is great if the series is a hit.

We are indeed in the territory of one proverbial needle in a haystack. The island has nearly 200 reported treasure sites.

Old film clips are nicely colorized, and there is much history here to learn, and that makes this program at least worth additional attention.

Action is fairly fast-paced initially, with modern equipment and technology enhancing the search: the cast also has a researcher at Stanford, finding old maps and matching to satellite views of the terrain.

This series looks like a goodie! We are hooked already.