Oak Island 7:18: End is Near (sort of)

DATELINE: Last Drill of the Year

 Laird Nivens & Marty Lagina.

It almost sounds like Bible verse. We are up to and surpassing season 7 and episode 18, where there is now a connection between the swamp and the Money Pit. Was there any doubt? You never known on Curse of Oak Island.

Now, is there any proof?

Dr. Ian Spooner brought another colleague to the swamp, where they agreed that the mercury present is odd and not natural. They are of the mind that the swamp was used as a blue clay mine. Three hundred years ago some workers, pre-Mayflower, were seeking blue clay, which has a density and even religious significance in some societies.

The largest drills so far are arriving from ROC excavators to do a final month of burrowing into the Money Pit. No expense is being spared, but will they also endanger themselves? We wouldn’t be surprised as the obsession seems to be growing as fast as the budget for the series.

You know common sense has gone when Rick Lagina takes a sip of brackish water to determine if it is salty in the swamp.

The other new evidence is at the ruins of the home of Samuel Ball, the former slave who became the richest man in Nova Scotia in the early 1800s. Speculation that he found treasure has centered on him for decades, and now ground penetrating radar finds walls and chambers under his former home. But permits are needed for excavation: which means next year.

Dan Henskee and Dave Blankenship push the honorary button to dig into the Money Pit with new heavy-duty equipment. How much can be retrieved before the season ends is the question. After all, you can see the heavier coats on the searchers. We are coming to the end of another year of endless clues and constant teasings.

 

 

 

Closer and Closer on Oak Island

DATELINE: Muddy Waters

 Magical 13 Branches?

For the seventh season, we feel more and more that it is just like many of the previous seasons—except results now are becoming more compelling.

Digging in the swamp has now proven a wooden shaft or structure that is man-made. By whom? That remains the constant conundrum.

Several other factors give us our déjà vu moment, again and again. This time they are talking about a bladder coffer dam to hold back sediment. It seems like the fourth season again.

Lagina Nephew Peter Fornetti remains omnipresent and omni-silent. But Alex Lagina is now speaking more forcefully, like a true star of the show.

If there is a striking element here, it is the rise of the second bananas over seven seasons: these individuals now sit regular at the big discussion table. They are integral to the search: Paul Troutman, Laird Nivens, Doug Crowell, Gary Drayton, and now the overweight big man of the bulldozers, Billy. Each has earned a following among fans.

However, the bobby dazzler himself, Gary Drayton continues to be the mover and shaker of all discoveries. This week is not unusual. He locates on the west side of the island some kind of brooch: a leaf on coils of rope. He contends it is quite old and was a rich soldier’s bauble, perhaps a uniform pin.

Once cleaned up, it proves to have 13 branches on the fern: but is more like the tree on George Washington’s flag. It is a Masonic and Templar symbol. It may have been the symbol of the American Revolution that wanted to bring Nova Scotia into the original colonies of the United States.

Carbon dating is more frequently turning up dates in the 1700s, often parallel to the American Revolution. It hints that Oak Island may have more to do with the Founding Fathers like Ben Franklin and ties to the French allies.