Mysteryquest: 4th Reich Regenerated in US?

Original Bormann grave in Ita, Paraguay

DATELINE: Reich and Wrong

Back in 2009,Mysteryquest listed an examination of the continuation of the Third Reich through the theoretical Odessa Organisation.

According to war crimes experts, Odessa was the name of a secret group that was dedicated to helping about 100,000 Nazis flee Germany in the five or six years after the fall of Hitler.

The Mysteryquestshow to prove or disprove the existence of Odessa actually was sidetracked into a Nazi hunt for how leading Nazis (Eichmann, Bormann, and Mengele) managed to evade the authorities after World War II and took up refuge in South America, notably Paraguay.

The evidence pointed to an escape route, enabled by extreme Roman Catholic priests who supported the Nazis. There is some evidence that the Catholic church continues to cover up the crime of fugitive Nazis as late as 2009.

All this seems to take on new life with the emergence of right-wing white supremacist groups like Proud Boys in the United States under the Trump regime. The attempt to fill the Supreme Court with Nazi sympathizers would fulfill the promise of a Fourth Reich.

 

According to Mysteryquest over a decade ago, Bormann’s body was buried originally in 1959 in Paraguay where he died—but his remains were moved to Germany after that to hide his escape and thwart investigators. The body had the DNA of Bormann, including newer dental work, done long after the collapse of the Third Reich.

With journalists and writers like Graeme Wood, the show did not prove Odessa existed, but surely indicated that far-right extremists were still a powerful force in the world.

 

 

 

Boys from Brazil: Where the Nuts Are

DATELINE: Hitler Clones 

 Peck as Mengele!

Back in the day, Ira Levin was one hot writer. He was knocking out Broadway and movie hits with aplomb, and writing novels too. He was entertainment and controversy, wit and delight. Apart from Death Trap, he gave us Boys from Brazil.

One of his least favorite set-pieces was the novel and movie about Josef Mengele. How short-sighted they were back in those days. The main criticism centered on Atticus Finch, the hero of all things American, being done up as a pasty and hideous looking Mengele. Yes, sir, that’s Gregory Peck in the lead role, horrifying.

He is magnificent, but back then he was stung by severe criticism. His performance may be one side of over-the-top , but when you ae playing one of the evilest fiends in history, it’s hard to pull back.

The cast is utterly astounding

Playing the old Jewish Nazi hunter whose efforts have gone past relevance is Laurence Olivier. Even Peck’s Mengele has no respect for the old-timer who warns young and hunky Steve Guttenberg to get out of Paraguay before there is one less nice Jewish boy. In an early role, Guttenberg is a sacrifice to plot, replaced by his clone John Rubinstein.

James Mason, who always accounted for Nazis of varying stripes, plays a Prussian aristocratic Nazi. Every nuance of his performance, especially with Peck, is a subtext of delight. And, you have to stand back in sheer horror at a gala soiree of Nazis in Paraguay in the 1980s.

Throw in a passel of well-known character actors—from Anne Meara and Uta Hagen to John Dehner and Denholm Elliot—and you have a hoot of acting. What other movie features two 70ish stars in a dirty, knock-down fight to death at the climax?

Yes, Ira Levin knew how to entertain and write a film that was 40 years ahead of its time.

What brought the fiercest criticism was the crypto-science of the age: genetic research! The public could not accept Mengele’s theories that he could clone humans—and create a new Master Race leader. How silly they were back then! It would only take 30 years to make the story less crypto.

The boys back in Brazil were hardly your run of the mill Nazi party members: Mengele was after the big fish. He had enough DNA from Hitler to make a bunch of them from now until kingdom come!

Today, that is cutting edge. It’s quite a movie.