Ratings Gold for Civil War Gold Show!

DATELINE: Moneybags Lagina Wins!

in Hackley library In Hackley Library Under His Images!

Somebody up there at History Channel knows how to salt a mine. Tenderfoot types are buying the bullion by the cartload.

The curse of Civil War Gold is the albatross of the Curse of Civil War Gold. It’s too late to change the show’s title, and they’re stuck with it. Kevin Dykstra, the originator, seems more and more bewildered that his pitch has been hijacked and evolves each week into something far afield from his notion of a gold hunt series.

Take the latest episode as the arc of the season nears its end. “Grave Expectations,” throws another ironic title at him. You know he’s out of his element.

Now he leads a team with co-leader Alex Lagina who joins him on the big moments, like meeting a great-grandson of a Michigan man who has gold purportedly from the Jeff Davis arrest. And when the team meets with Marty Moneybags Lagina, the old man had demanded to hold gold in his hand—it is Alex sitting next to him.

As if to add irony to the biting satire of meeting a man who confirms the Confederate Treasury was stolen by Union soldiers and hometown businessmen, the meeting takes place in the Hackley Public Library.

You guessed it: sitting under photos of Charles Hackley, the man Kevin Dykstra maligns at every stage of the series, they meet with a descendant of the conspiracy.

Well, at least, they confirmed this time that the mummy of John Wilkes Booth was a carnival attraction for years—hardly the proper fate of a man in on a plot to steal hundreds of millions of dollars in gold.

And, once again, an attempt to find the escape tunnel Booth used at Garrett’s Farm, is futile and pointless, as they have no permission to excavate to prove anything. An aside throws out the info that unspecified “authorities” have refused to allow Booth’s remains to be exhumed and tested with DNA.

The series has taken on a new life—and will likely be back on History next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War Gold Turns Booth into a Mason!

DATELINE:  Color Him Unreal?

color him unreal Fake Stanton?

Old wine is seldom put in new bottles. Civil War Gold missed the key point that the mummy of John Wilkes Booth toured in carnivals until the 1930s. Now, maybe there’s gold in his fillings.

If you happen to be the History Channel and their latest attempt to find plots, you start to delve into Wilkes Booth escape myths, conspiracies, to package them into alluring entertainments.

The idea that John Wilkes Booth died in Enid, Oklahoma, in 1903 is not new. Of course, the Curse of Civil War Gold wants to tie in the Masons; Booth was no Mason, and he likely would have not been appreciated by men like Hackley. Booth was more likely assisted by Col. John Mosby and his Rangers to escape the dragnet of Union soldiers at the Garrett Barn in 1865.

However, looking for escape hatches is not a bad idea, and it does lend some intrigue to the series that has gone far afield from its original mission: finding the stolen Confederate treasury that was in partial possession of Jeff Davis.

As a sidebar, more tunnels are being researched by the second-tier team in Muskegon. In fact, there are apparently more tunnels in that Michigan city than in the New York subway system. And, every tunnel between buildings was meant to move gold bullion secretly.

No other possibility is ever considered.

The Curse remains unexplained, but the Civil War Gold never helped John Wilkes Booth or Edwin Stanton. That fact is indisputable, no matter what you hear on the series that has been hijacked by Alex Lagina who coyly never admits he may be a Mason too.

Other, more peculiar theories on Booth may yet be in offing. They are there for the picking, if the show wants to veer a few more degrees off-course.

In many ways, the show is about as off-color as the fake colorized photographs of Stanton.

New Book on Jack the Ripper

DATELINE: Alternative History

Everyone has a theory on the Ripper–and a new book seems to play on one angle heavily.

A few diehards believe that Jack was actually an American doctor, one of those whose treatment of patients tended toward herbal remedies. Dr. Francis Tumblety made a fortune selling his formula to clear up pimples. Indeed, his Pimple Banisher became as much an international sensation as did he.

The little-known theory is that the Ripper actually new John Wilkes Booth. This neatly ties together several of the most notorious 19th century figures into one tale.

The common link between them was a judge at the military trial of Booth’s co-conspirators. There, at Old Capitol Prison, Gen. Lew Wallace encountered Dr. Tumblety who was arrested as a suspicious associate of the plot and its members.

Years later, in 1889, having fled the East End of London and returned the United States, there seems to be an occasional for Dr. Tumblety to confront Lew Wallace who had become rich and famous for writing BEN HUR: A Tale of the Christ.

Therein lies the tale of WHEN JACK THE RIPPER MET BEN HUR, now available as an ebook and softcover on Amazon for armchair detectives who may find the clues thrown together as rather shocking. Wallace seemed to make a habit of knowing the worst of society. Among his pen-pals was Billy the Kid, whom  he knew from his term as Governor of New Mexico.

It’s hard to separate the reality from the theories of what Tumblety had to say to Wallace. But this new book tells the story in a style of grand entertainment. Their conversation might be likened to a game of chess–or ping pong.

This novella now joins WHEN BILLY THE KID MET BEN HUR and WHEN J. WILKES BOOTH MET BEN HUR to round out an unknown life of a famous writer. We wait for the movie version, likely to come eventually with two roles as juicy as this twosome.

 

 

 

 

Booth and Oswald: a study in similarities

Their educations were the epitome of their eras. John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald went to every educational institution of his age–and still found failure at every turn. This classic book presents a perspective on the assassins that is unusual and fascinating.

Image

from cover of Booth & Oswald

Available on Amazon.com in both softcover and ebook.