Review of Oak Island Unearthed

 DATELINE: Recommended Book

You can bet your bottom of 10-X dollar that the Laginas would never have gone out to Oak Island if they had talked to John O. O’Brien when they were kids growing up in Michigan.

Marty would never have spent any of his filthy millions on buying up the property. They would not be interested in finding the tomb of Montezuma, nor would they believe he was in Canada. Who would?

Well, one enlightened author from Nova Scotia grew up with stories about the fabled treasure—and he has put the theories into a book, available online and in print. You can be sure that the Laginas have not read it.

John O’Brien appeared on the third season of Curse of Oak Island, one of many strange theories the show entertained—and ultimately dismissed. Mr. O’Brien was never asked back, and his theories were only half-inspected.

His book, called Oak Island Unearthed,is a thoughtful and personal recollection of a man who grew up near the legendary Oak Island. His career as a miner with insights into the science and technology of geology provides an interesting perspective.

You may have seen him treated rudely by Marty Lagina on their series, dismissing his ideas about how the Aztecs had the advanced knowledge to accomplish the feats at Oak Island. In fact, they performed much of the engineering in their own local Mexican territory.

What may seem incredible is that the Aztecs would travel to Nova Scotia for any purpose, let alone to hide the body of Montezuma. All of their travels have gained credibility since Aztec artifacts were found in Georgia!

Though the TV series picked up on the motif of corn in Scotland art work and architecture a century before it was introduced to Europe, the TV show did not give O’Brien credit for this notion, or the truly amazing detail that the Aztecs regarded blue clay as more valuable than gold.

In one scene of the TV show, they complain about all the strange blue clay on the island, never connecting it to the Aztecs who went all over North America in search of this ceremonial pigment.

The clues of corn and blue clay are compelling arguments. This is a book that is eye-opening and for those not blindly following the cursed TV series.

Mr. O’Brien’s book lays out the arguments in both technical and non-technical terms, giving a personal and conversational explanation to his lifelong beliefs.

He was denied a chance to explore the island by earlier owners, like Nolan and Blankenship. And, his final visit to Oak Island by the Lagina group was less than satisfying.

You will step back and re-consider some of his notions when you read this fascinating account of the presumed treasure.