Death Masks of Jesus Overlapped?

 DATELINE: Trio of Relics

jesus Unnerving image of three faces!

We weren’t sure what to make of this Italian documentary from 2013. Is it pious drivel? Archeological truth? Or mere balderdash?

Searching for the Face of Jesus was not what we expected.

Instead of a history lesson on the artful depictions of the man from Nazareth and how his consistent image developed, we had a focus on three relics, one of which we knew almost nothing about.

The Shroud of Turin is best known of all: subject to many investigations, debunking, carbon dating controversy, etc.

The burial face cloth in Spain, merely a blood-caked faceless cloth that was wrapped around a dead man’s head is a relic with some historical evidence going way back. Indeed, a cloth was used as a wrap to transport the crucified man to his tomb.

And, the third item struck us as the most peculiar of all: the Sacred Face made by Veronica. It is the most legendary of the relics, and the oddest of all. Purportedly, a woman ran up to the living Jesus on the way to his death and wiped his face with a thin silk cloth. A double image transferred to both sides of the small towel.

How on earth did wide-open brown eyes transfer to the cloth?

The documentary then does something most unusual. It overlays the three face images by means of computer effects.

There are 140 points of match. The three faces are of the same man.

The film fails to tell us that blood tests on two of the cloths indicated a rare AB negative blood type. The Veronica image is not miraculous, merely creepy. The eyes of the man are staring through the mists of time. How that transferred is inexplicable.

The climax of the documentary is the overlay of the Shroud face with the faceless bloody cloth—and the eye-opening man on his way to death.

As pay-offs go, this one knocked our agnostic heart for a loop.

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Leonardo’s Musical Interlude on Ancient Aliens

DATELINE: Revelations 13.2

Salvator mundi  The Latest Ancient Aliens Gospel!

You may be cynical and note that it took Ancient Aliens thirteen seasons to come around to Leonardo da Vinci (with one regular host mispronouncing the name a dozen times during the episode).

The second episode of the season tells us at the onset that Da Vinci used his art to tell us about higher intelligence in the universe. Yeah, him. The show proceeds to tell us that one theory is that the fifteen surviving Da Vinci paintings are presenting us with the solution to a puzzle.

Believers in alien contact think Da Vinci was in direct contact with creatures from another plane. We are told that the two-year gap in his life may have meant he was communing with other life forms. More mundane experts say he was under house arrest for sexual peccadilloes (but AA will never mention that).

If any intriguing notion comes forth, it is the one in which a researcher has discovered musical notes painted into “The Last Supper.” It has been recorded—and comes out as a forty-second dirge. Shades of Close Encounters of Steven Spielberg.

This leads to the conclusion that Jesus was here to spread his alien DNA into the real Grail, Mary Magdalene. Leonardo, according to ancient alien theorists, embedded secret messages into his artwork.

The centerpiece of the show is the $400m Salvator Mundi painting of Jesus, recently sold at auction. It seems Jesus is holding a crystal ball with the constellation Orion within—shades of the layout of the Giza pyramids.

We are fascinated that Leonardo would depict Jesus with a Buddhist orb/or heretical crystal ball of a witch. It’s all there in just another wild episode of Ancient Aliens.

The Passover Plotter: Jacobovic Decodes Jesus

DATELINE:  Easter Egg Hunts

simcha  Simcha

Each Easter the usual movie diet includes heavy helpings of Ben Hur or King of Kings. So, this season we are going in for something a tad alternative.

Decoding the Ancients is a six-part series hosted by that Biblical gadfly Simcha Jacobovic. Though he comes across as an errant academic scholar, he is billed as an investigative journalist. The series may be called by other titles, but Amazon Prime is offering it for free.

Jacobovic is truly is a man with unusual perspectives on the Old and New Testament.

The first episode deals with Caiaphas, the high priest who sent Jesus to the Romans for crucifixion. Jacobovic’s theory is that Caiaphas took a bad rap from the gospels who needed a house villain—and the notion is underscored by finding the ossuary of the high priest in 1990.

Small twisted nails found with his bones could have been artifacts from Jesus, but have disappeared. Jacobovic sees them as keepsakes of the most important and only death Caiaphas oversaw as high priest. He must track them down, which is fascinating.

Subsequent episodes follow graffiti at Pompeii that reveals that Christian slaves were there—and already spreading their faith less than a decade after the fall of Jerusalem. Fear of God from the volcanic horror of Vesuvius caused panic among Romans who began to embrace the word of Jesus as payback for the sacking of the Jewish state.

In other episodes, Jacobovic seems to ignore the Essenes and Emperor Constantine’s mother who found the True Cross and nails, allegedly. They might fit his theories, but one is left that angles were not examined.

Another episode suggests that Jesus went to the land of Gad…in Spain, not Galilee. It’s intriguing stuff.

The shows are short and jam-packed with detail and clever investigative reporting. You might find your faith challenged, but more likely the shows will serve you well as gospel’s truth. It’s a definite change of pace from the usual Easter TV specials.