Another Dr. Moreau from H.G. Wells

DATELINE:  Genetic Engineering’s Early Days

 moreau Lancaster Experiments on York!

Of the many Island of Dr. Moreau movies, with its many caricatures of the deranged scientist, we count Charles Laughton and Marlon Brando. Each played a zaftig and outrageous mad scientist to the rafters.

In 1977, the most subdued of the versions came out from American International, of all studios, and starred Burt Lancaster as Dr. Moreau. The titan of movies was then 65, but still virile and active. His performance is pure Burt.

Playing the young shipwrecked officer came another star at the top of his game: Michael York, wafer-thin and at his most attractive in the decade where his name was above the title.

He and Lancaster really have several face-offs of grand debate over science. It falls to Lancaster to give his performance the veneer of respectability. He is not a caricature but comes across as the voice of reason. It makes his mad scientist even more frightful.

In an age before DNA, the H.G. Wells tale deals with genetic mutation at the cellular level by means of serum. Here, Moreau wants to change animals into men.

It becomes horrific when he decides to change a man into an animal in the name of science—and York is the victim.

The cast is small, but effective. Among the standouts are Richard Basehart, unrecognizable in makeup, and Nigel Davenport as the assistant to Moreau. Around for looks is Barbara Carrera, standard exotic beauty of the decade.

As for the manimals, they seem to be wearing the leftover costumes from some Planet of the Apes sequel.

The movie belongs to the master, Lancaster. Savor it.

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Profiteers of Science Fiction

DATELINE: MOVIE & TV MASHUP

 ImageHOST RIDLEY SCOTT

Prophetic writers have been the backbone of imagination since before an anonymous scribe wrote The Book of Revelations.

The Prophets of Science Fiction illustrates the power of ten brilliant modern writers to foresee the future. The documentary series with host Ridley Scott may be suffering from a misnomer in the title of the series.

The ten writers under examination are each given an episode and a dominating theme from their works becomes the focal point. Soon, however, observers will note that experts and scientists cite the writer only in the context of seeing a movie version of a short story or novel.

Yes, stunning movie clips from the illustrated visions of the writers becomes Ridley Scott’s point as he sketches storyboards while narrating.

Even with the biographical information on Arthur Clarke, Mary Shelley, H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, and others, the literary works really are secondary to the prophets of movie science fiction. Let’s face the fact that these great writers have been resurrected by the technologies they foresaw.

Any child knows that the movie vision has hallucinatory impact that causes nightmares. And, the series delves into the psychological terrorism of computers, death, and the time/space continuum. Kids generally don’t have nightmares from reading the books.

None of this should denigrate the series that is both literary and cinematic. It contains insights the average fan of movies (or books) may not understand about the writers and their lives.

The episode count succinctly distills (is that a tautology?) each horrific vision (or even optimistic view) for its accuracy against modern science. The results are quite impressive and may drive you to download a book or two to your tablet.

Of course, some great science fiction writers have been left out of the loop—probably saved for a second season that never came. We should therefore look at what the series gives us as a crash course in the genre as a gift, not the end-all.

 

If you like movies and TV, you can find the complete reviews of Ossurworld in books like MOVIE MASHUP and MOVIES TO SEE–OR NOT TO SEE. All movie books are available for download at Amazon.com for smart readers.

Boston Celtic Paul Pierce Puts Time in A Bottle

 DATELINE: HUMOR!

Paul Pierce, Celtics Superman, became the oldest player to score 40 points in a regulation game in history for the Boston franchise.  Considering the talent that passed through the Celtics, this is no flat feat.

Coach Doc Rivers alluded earlier in the week to the Hot Tub Time Machine, but little did we know that Pierce actually owns the prototype.

H.G. Wells wrote about time machines over 100 years ago, but apparently he gave one to the ageless Boston Celtic star.

Sometimes after a grueling game, Pierce holds an interview and looks even younger than he did at the game’s start. Call it relaxed muscles, but his face glows with youth.

Pierce does not have one of those android bodies, but instead comes across as lithe and functional. He may be a visitor from the future, sort of like when Christopher Reeve took a journey Somewhere in Time to visit Jane Seymour.

Nowadays when we see Jane Seymour selling her heart diamond pendants on TV, we think she has a time machine too.

Novelist Richard Matheson loved to write those time travel stories and did a few for the Twilight Zone. Paul Pierce certainly deserves his own outer limits storyline.

Not since dog Peabody and his boy Sherman have we seen an example of the Way Back Machine in action. If you don’t know Peabody and Sherman, you need to buy a Way Back Machine.

Bob Dylan once wrote a song about the changing times where he noted that the old road is rapidly aging. Maybe it is for some travelers and basketball players, but surely not for Paul Pierce.

 If you enjoy William Russo’s humor on sports and movies, you may want to read his books GREAT SPORTS STORIES: THE LEGENDARY FILMS or BEST BOSTON SPORTS HUMOR OF 2012. All Russo’s works are available at Amazon.com both in ebook and softcover formats.