Trump’s World View: It’s Over for You!

DATELINE: Go forth, and die.

 Your Trumpmeister

It’s now becoming clear that President Trump thinks when your time is up, you are done for. He wants to resume “normal” life, even if it means genocide to large groups of people. Trump is now wearing the robes of the Grim Reaper.

It’s one way to boost the economy: only the strong will survive. It’s Nietzche, Malthus, and madness, all wrapped in one genetic formula. If you are old, poor, disabled, you should die and have done with it.

You are holding up the rest of the human race.

Let the dead bury the dead.

“We who are about to die salute you, who will live.”

Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow, coronavirus will kill you.

Life is for living, and death is for dying.

If this means that half the world buries the other half, Trump is betting your life that he will be among the survivors.

Throw out those old-fashioned notions of science and humanity, your duty is to die if you are among the weakest links in the chain of life. At least, that is the Trump viewpoint.

No respirators for you. No medicine for you. Go about your business until you drop. Those who are meant to live will carry on. You weaklings will fall by the wayside and end your miserable drag on society.

Trump wants a leaner, meaner society: only those who can cough it up and continue.

So long, grandma and gramps, your time is up. You lived your life—and the partygoeers on the beach will not give you much thought after you go. As Trump will tell you, the cure is worse than the sickness.

The disease is over, but the patient died.

Carthage: A Bad Roman Holiday

DATELINE: Rome’s Unbuilt Day

 Hunky Scholar!

You have to love Dr. Richard Miles, not your usual host of these archaeological dig histories. We dig him and are dismayed that he gave up a media career to stay in academia. If you want history with a twist of lemon, try Carthage: the Roman Holocaust.

Miles is your quintessential media hunk—with credentials to kill for: Cambridge University, notable scholarship, and a presence to walk among the ruins with sharp observations.

Make no mistake, Dr. Miles has an axe to grind: he does not like the Roman Empire. Indeed, what they did to Carthage he compares to Hiroshima. They obliterated a city brick-by-brick for defying Roman authority. They attempted genocide on a people after 150 years of war. Talk about overkill.

Wearing an assortment of t-shirts and jeans, Richard Miles stops his perambulations now and then to smirk into the camera with one of his zinger one-liners.

Miles walks miles and miles before the end of this saga.

He is not shy about gruesome details either—if you want the uncivilized and unvarnished tale of two Punic Wars.

Dr. Miles puts emphasis on two individuals, one from Carthage and the other from Rome. They turn out to be metaphoric representations of the mind of ancient political and military philosophy: which is not too far removed from contemporary times,

In the corner of Carthage you have Hannibal. Miles shares many little-known details about the man with elephants at the gates of Rome. He was the bogeyman that terrified Rome for the rest of the Empire’s length. He was their worst nightmare come true.

On the other hand, you have the master race Roman version of Hitler in Cato, the jingoistic and nationalistic white supremacist of the Seven Hills. He wanted only the utter destruction, annihilation, and decimation of the arch-rival for Rome.

You can view this priceless documentary in two parts or one long one on Prime. Alas, Dr. Miles forsook a career in TV and moved on the Australian and the University of Sydney where he seems to prefer academic administration.

In our experience, there is not much difference between the Roman Empire and college admin than in a Roman holocaust.