Westworld 3.2 Shows Nazi-world

DATELINE: Episode Two of WWIII 

You can’t keep track of the androids without a scorecard. They are everywhere, and we might even call them Replicants, but that’s another movie called Blade Runner. Same idea, different off-world rebels. This show is called Westworld III, and you may be lost in the escape from robotic Centerville. They don’t want to call it world of Nazi, so it’s Warworld. No, we didn’t see a Trump lookalike cavorting there, either as a host or a guest.

We’ve been a bit confused (who isn’t?) when normal humans are taking on dangerous roles as bodyguards, etc. Why are the robots not here in spirit?

Since everyone seems to have a duplicate robot version, powered by a dirty powerball, everyone should theoretically be back for another season. However, the man behind the curtain is the wizard of Westworld, named Jonathan Nolan, and he decides if you go over the rainbow, or are simply deleted.

So, don’t grow despondent if your previous favorite character is nowhere to be seen—like Thandie Newton. The actress now shows up as an incongruous black woman in Naziworld. Who knew?

All journeys end up back at Westworld—where we find Maeve, Bernard, and a couple of humans. One surprise is that one of our favorite humans turns out to be another robotic programmed automaton. Who knew?

Somebody knows that Maeve is an agent of rebellion because they are trying to entice her with her former human friends to tell them what Dolores is up to. Failing that, she seems to be the robot recruit of the month to lead opposing forces to stop Evan Rachel Wood’s mad automaton attack on human existence.

In case you are wondering why the robots are looking older, we figured out that most of the cast is in their 40s, and unique robots, they cannot hold back time. However, stars like Thandie look marvelous for the given age.

So this is the set up for the shortened season three.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lonely Man, 1950s Latency Period

DATELINE: Another Oddball Western

not so lonely Tony Meets Jack at Gay Bar?

The Western lone rider is the loneliest guy this side of the Maytag repairman in the 1950s.

After appearing as the despicable gunfighter in Shane, there was only one place to go for Jack Palance: revisionist hero from hell. So, he was cast as the good guy in The Lonely Man. This was a trend, as Ernest Borgnine had just transformed into an Oscar-winner after a villainous streak. Rod Steiger was around the corner.

In 1957, the way to do this was to play either a wronged teenage son or a well-meaning father. The James Dean phenomenon was at work: so, they cast Anthony Perkins as the fey son, long separated from his gunslinging father (called an ‘aging’ gunfighter).

Perkins plays it so silly as rebel with a cause that James Dean would have laughed. He likely would have laughed too that mid-30s Palance was considered aging as a father to mid-20s Perkins. It could have been Tab, but Tony will do.

Yet, that was the style of those days. Daddy didn’t know best, but he tried.

And, you use the baritone country music of Tennessee Ernie Ford instead of Tex Ritter.

Some bad guys are unremitting: Neville Brand, Lee Van Cleef, and Elisha Cook.  They are planning on gunning down Palance first chance that comes their way. Elisha Cook’s revenge comes after Palance gunned him down in Shane.

Brand would turn goodie on TV within a few years, but it would take Van Cleef more than a decade to turn to goody-two-shoes roles. All are in their evil-doer prime here.

If you have a strong sense of homoeroticism in this movie, you are not paranoid. Palance “picks up” his son in a bar for the price of a drink. Perkins boasts anyone can have him at those prices. These guys are all interested in their male on male relationships over all else.

As a piece of Hollywood Western ersatz history, this film is a true curio.