Slow but Steady on Oak Island

DATELINE: What has We Got Here?

Big Billy & Gary

You may wonder how slowly they can go to keep us dangling. Whether it is Rick digging up the alleged 90ft stone that was the original evidence found in the Money Pit with hieroglyphic instructions.

We are becoming unsure whether the shows are in any order that makes sense. We seem to be repeating so many searches that we see stuff brought to the island for reasons unknown. We expect the Men in Black to show up next. We can’t keep our conspiracy theories from overlapping. We are beginning to feel like we are watching Geiko commercials calling themselves “sequels.” We have more smoking guns than you can shoot in 200 years.

Dr. Ian Spooner seems to be taking a second role to Gary Drayton. Not to be outdone, Billy Gearhardt has become another big star of the show—and now he’s working with Drayton.

Gary Drayton cannot be kept down forever. He keeps finding evidence that makes him the man of the moment. He is either a good luck piece or a brilliant investigator. He is only more important than Marty Lagina—but moneybags will always take position number one.

Back at the Money Pit, they find undisturbed soil, meaning they have missed the target.

Laird Niven, Billy Gearhardt and Rick Lagina move on to visit a spot where the famous 90-foot stone may be buried. There was nothing.

Yet, ever vigilant Gary finds an ancient iron pickaxe near the eye of the swamp. He speculates that they have found tunneling tools near the eye.

Now wood is found 100 years older than anything else: 1600s, confirming Dr. Spooner’s view that activity occurred around 1680.

If there is big news, it is that William Shatner will be arriving in two weeks at Oak Island. Beam us down.

Oak Island’s Swampy Roots

DATELINE: Swamp Thing

Another discovery now puts the wood dated at 1741, decades before the original slipway and when no one was actuallyliving on Oak Island.

 

No loading docks were needed unles they were unloading and burying something on the island.

 

In 1741 a French fort may have moved a massive gold reserve to Oak Island to keep out of British hands.

 

A visit to Fort Louisbourg 300 miles from Oak Island shows tunnels, walls, and structures built by French engineers. The same work there and Oak Island matches. A 97 ship fleet, led by a descendant of the Knights Templar, went on a mission to Oak Island, but the entire operation failed. Nothing was recovered.

 

Gary Drayton goes out and finds a musketball, which confirms that military people were on the island. They also take in the beach exposed by Dorian. He finds a rigging axe that could be from the early 1700s.

 

Rick Lagina and Doug Crowell show up at the fort and are stunned by the size and complexity of the military outpost. They are particularly interested in the tunnel system. They find a stone drain system similar to the water flow at Smith’s Cove. It’s a French drain.

 

They also find counter-mines, networks of booby traps.

 

There are images of a cross shaped tunnel that mirrors Nolan cross.

 

The entire crew shows up at the swamp to find some unusual rock formations, manmade. The only absentee is Marty Lagina, and son Alex stands in.

 

Dr. Ian Spooner assesses it. He thinks it is a manipulated work area to off-load and hide evidence.

Oak Island Turns Its Eye to Gary Drayton

 DATELINE: Oak Island Trifecta

  Lead Tag!

If you thought Gary Drayton changed the show since he came into his own, he made yet again another major discovery—as big as his Templar Cross of three years earlier. Curse of Oak Island is on the verge of a treasure trove of winning: a trifecta.

His insights, his luck, and his attitude, makes him a compelling figure. Gary went a long way to make Oak Island’s series the so-called #1 show on cable.

It is Gary who finds “bloody silver,” what the treasure hunters have always wanted: the most brazen evidence yet.

Three sites simultaneous digs meant to receive permits and going into the swamp foremost to dredge out water to show a 1200 AD structure.

They also now seem to have found the original Money Pit that was flooded first in 1805. That was not a factor in the 21stcentury where there is an arrogance that the flood tunnels can be shut off.

What this all means is that there could be three treasures on Oak island. It gels with the theories that different people, at different times, came to the island to do major excavation to hide mysterious historical treasures.

Metallurgist Dr. Christa Brousseau tells them that the tag is not silver, but it is impure lead. It was deliberately created possibly a thousand years ago.

Over in the swamp Dr. Ian Spooner is back, which is a sign that he is on hand for anticipation of something big.

Fred Nolan’s son believes they are looking at vindication of the surveyor’s lifelong hope.

Another metallurgist reveals in the War Room that this tag of impure lead is from an area well-known to the Knights Templar and may even be of similar origin.

The big payoff may be, however, undermined by Hurricane Dorian that is on the horizon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Oak Island Pays Dividends for Fans!

DATELINE: Gob-Smacked by Gary Drayton

 Steve Guptill

At long last, not even bad delaying tactics of the show’s producers can stop the progress to something important. Long-suffering fans who have put up with endless recaps and repetitive reminders may now be able to see a mystery unfold.

Well, it’s not quite the same as having the UFO land on the White House lawn, but finding giant structures under a long-submerged bay area tells us that the rise in oceans has complicated the treasure hunt.

Young surveyor Steve Guptill has emerged this season from nowhere to be Rick Lagina’s right hand.  He is in on every discovery and has the complete trust and attention of Mr. Lagina. We are happy he has found a true companion with talent, beauty and brains. He has located the first tunnel made to avoid the flood drains in 1805.

Once again, members of the team find unusual features—and then Rick Lagina shows up. Yet Smith’s Cove now has giant logs, not smaller, meaning the engineering was overwhelmingly difficult. What were they doing hundreds of years ago?

The other big news is the Swamp. They may have found the Eye of the Swamp as the theoretical center of the treasure. Again, an art expert has used French paintings to reveal secret information—which makes Marty Lagina particularly cynical.

Expert Dr. Ian Spooner returns—and Steve Guptill is in charge of digging in the swamp eye, a coring operation to determine the swamp’s age.

Not to be undone, Gary Drayton finds a wooden peg or two at the cove. What we have here is massive structure made on a grand scale 1220 A.D. in Nova Scotia. Significant human activity is discovered in 1675 or so, as well.

We are now in the area of Knights Templar.

Swamp Thing on Oak Island

 DATELINE: Progress on Oak Island

 Treasure Map?

Something is bogged down on Oak Island, under the swamp that is. We do have to admit this season of Curse of Oak Island is the best one so far.

Marty Lagina seems finally to be convinced that there is something in the swamp, though he is one to admit that the rocky side of Oak Island really has never been explored for tunnels. That remains the truly amazing detail.

Once again, academic experts are the real stars of this show. Dr. Ian Spooner provides a perspective of a scientist looking at the swamp—and only when he tells them it is man-made do they feel some vindication. The real question is why it took seven years to confirm a theory that the Nolan-Blankenship diggers postulated decades ago.

Heartthrob Alex Lagina is given a larger role, and lets his younger nephew Peter Fornetti tag along with historian Charles Barkhouse, as they visit Dr. Christa Brosseau at St. Mary’s College in Halifax.

She seems non-plussed at meeting yet another group of visitors from Oak Island. She tells them what Gary Drayton has claimed all along: those swages found were tools that go back to the original searchers, at the latest.

Why haven’t they invited her to the Island? Women are always an afterthought on Oak Island.

The multiple searches also pay off location of remnants of dynamite that was used around 1900 to try to shut off the flood mechanisms that have ruined many a search. Whenever these primitive technological devices were created on Oak Island, they garner respect for those under-educated pirates or knights who buried the whole shebang.

Once again, folkhero Gary Drayton takes on the unenviable task of diving into the swamp to locate iron in a perimeter area that is now called the all-seeing “Eye of the Swamp.”

Don’t let your pineal gland go to your head, but this indicates that there may be a gateway to treasure awaiting us.