Hitch Your Wagon to a Gold Star

DATELINE: Curses Again & Again!

Hackley manse  Suspicious Hackley House!

Curse of Civil War Gold has become an off-shoot of Curse of Oak Island. It’s not even a spin-off, just a continuation like the other show History has developed, Digging Deeper on Oak Island. The formula of two middle-aged brothers on a quest is a gold mine.

If you have a hit show, you might as well milk it to high heaven. Kevin Dykstra may know this more than any of us. Whatever hostility he might have harbored to having his gold hunt show hijacked by Marty Lagina, has given way to obsequious sucking up.

This second episode had Dykstra asking people in his crew to step aside to let Alex Lagina look at the sonar findings under Lake Michigan. Yup, the bread is now buttered up.

We cannot fault Alex who is who he is: the youngest one on the series, and clearly the star with drawing power. So far, Gary Drayton has not made his appearance to bolster the Civil War Gold series.

A couple of thrusts dominated the second episode: there was the return to the lake, looking for a sunken box car that reportedly was witnessed by a nameless death bed lighthouse keeper. Okay.

The other angle was the continued character assassination of Charles Hackley, a banker and noted Victorian citizen of Michigan who is accused of evil and greedy wrong-doing.

This time the gang wants to prove he had a tunnel from his house to the bank to the railroad station. As they conclude, it was for the worst possible motive.

Who knows?  These guys act as though they do.

The show’s high-point for us was when Alex insisted he must return to Oak Island because they are short-handed in Nova Scotia. This is after we witnessed 500 workers and heavy machine operators all season. Daddy Marty’s payroll is bursting at the seams.

The producer decision to abandon the first season approach for a sequel to Oak Island is not to be disparaged. It seems to be working out.

Coda for Oak Island Season 6

DATELINE:  Digging Deeper Junior Varsity

dan

The end comes from the Digging Deeper adjunct TV series that often accompanies the regular series episodes of Curse of Oak Island. These are not narrated with the lugubrious tones of Robert Clotworthy, but instead seem to emanate out of Matty Blake in stream-of-consciousness.

Though we seem to be less offended by his stick-your-nose-into attitude, he still comes across as an interloper whose nose remains brown to the Lagina brothers. The key group in Michigan included Tester, Jack Begley, Alex, and the two brothers. You learned where the power and money begins and ends.

Once again, he shows up at family meetings in Traverse, Michigan, and plops down into the setting to hear the seismic results. We have to admit being surprised that these findings were not withheld until season 7.

The radar seems to indicate something large, like an old ship, is buried there under a layer of silt. Next season is set forth for us.

The other major factor of the episode’s coda was the honoring of Dan Blankenship with rare photos and lots of eulogies. The 95-year old never gave up his hope, but may now only see the results from another dimension of time and space.

Privacy toward the grand old man was kept, as there was nothing of the service and memorial to him. We presume his name will be added to the marker on Oak Island sometime next season.

We give Blake credit for doing a commendable job in the sensitive aftermath of Dan’s death. Son Dave admitted his partnership with his father was life altering.

Rick Lagina seemed most deeply affected by the passing of the old legend, but life moves on—and the new, next season will likely be dedicated fully to Dan Blankenship.

Oak Island S6 Goes into History Books

DATELINE: From Oak Island to Heaven?

appeal to heaven Washington’s 13 Branches!

Curse of Oak Island has indeed saved the best for last.

We thought we were at the end of the road several times, but as a cold autumn wind chills the treasure hunters, they are going out on top of the world.

Of all the discoveries, the most haunting images remain of Dan Blankenship at 95, looking vibrant and sharp. He starts off the show receiving the news about the tree rings proving that work was done before the Money Pit theories commenced around 1800.

As the hour develops, there seems suddenly a connection that puts frosting on the cake of Knights Templar:  Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson spent time in France—and may have ties to the descendants of the Templars.

If Nova Scotia wanted to become the thirteenth state or colony in the American Revolution, it had a fortune to provide to finance the fight against the British.

Did they bring into the conspiracy the man who became the father of the United States, the man who used his Masonic roots and applied them to his flag: the famous “appeal to heaven!”  Why is the template for the flag also found on Oak Island?

George Washington’s 13 branches of his tree of heaven—and his 13 colonies relate to the magical number of 13 in Templar lore. Fascinating.

As chilling as these notions are for the basis of another season, it is the arresting image of Dan Blankenship at the end of the show that is most profound and sad. He drives off alone in his golf cart, the last one to leave the final meeting of the season, alone and singular, a figure of legendary power.

More Spirit of 1776 on Oak Island

DATELINE:   20th Episode of Season 6

spirit of 1776JPG

Who’d have thunk Oak Island would reach 20 episodes in one season?  And, who would believe that they might hang on to hope when results seem skimpy?

Yet, here we are, with a drained swamp and about 2000 seismic charges about to blow little holes in the plot to hide Templar treasure. Instead, we are back to those pesky Masons and Founding Fathers.

As usual, we had the regular incident of nearly every week. Metal expert Gary Drayton went out to some remote location and found a coin. As one friend said, it seems like a rerun. This time, Gary did not point out that the coin had a square hole in its center. Nearly every item he has found seemed to have a square hole in it—to which he made a big deal.

And again, Alex Lagina was trotted out like a prized prince to no particular reason to look decorative at Smith’s Cove and to make the pronouncement that they had found something significant.

Beyond that, the group of treasure hunters has shrunk remarkably by this point: it’s nearly November 1st—and they are lucky there is no snow.

The huge construction crews are gone—and the diggers are the geologist, the archeologist, the historian, the library researcher, and the metal detector. Second bananas are the real worker bees in this cove.

A scientist expert in tree rings enters at the end to give a date to the various wood structures. No one seems disappointed that the construction is not pre-Columbus, or pre-Templar massacre. It is rather akin to the American Revolution.

It is, rather importantly, the 99.999 % certainty that it predates the dates of the Money Pit discovery by a mere twenty years.

We are left with one last episode of season six to pull this all together.

 

 

 

 

 

Penultimate Sixth Season Episode

 DATELINE: The Gary Drayton Show!

Gary and JackGary Talks to Jack.

We are turning the seasonal clock to another chance the show will end here and now out of frustration. Perhaps only for a few fans.

Somehow, we doubt it if there is money to be discovered, or something akin to ratings popularity. You know when Rick Lagina calls the devastating work stoppage “a minor set-back,” and when his brother says, it’s time to make lemonade from the lemons, you have a grandiose problem.

North Atlantic weather is never entirely reliable, and even in these last few weeks of the season, you seem to have extremely cold days, and then they doff their jackets in mid-day sun.

However, time is the enemy of finding anything of value. So, they again bring in another in the litany of amateur historians who tells them there is half a billion dollars of loot somewhere on the island. Buck up, my Buckos.

This expert has done study of Scottish barons who came to the Canadian land over two centuries, and they came with tons of secret family treasure. Yup, these guys were descendants of the Knights Templar.

It takes Gary Drayton again to save the show, if not the season. With his acumen at high level, he finds more Brit uniform gold buttons—and even is the one who must go down into a leaky, pumped out cold well near the money pit. The local archeologist now is merely phoned–and he instantly acquiesces. Gone are the drawn-out legal matters.

We found it interesting his clothes were soaked and dirty whilst the two Lagina brothers were reasonably clean. Who goes on strike next?

Drayton finds more stuff in the old well, which he theorizes is important.

With only one show left, we think the bait is set to keep audiences riveted and wanting more.

 

 

Pirates on Oak Island: Deep Digging

DATELINE:  Extra-curricular Episode!

Matty Blake  Matty Blake: Out in the Rain Again!

The subset of the Curse of Oak Island is a series of a half-dozen shows that look at issues around the history and research of Oak Island.

This annotated bunch of episodes, on topics like paranormal and pirate history, is hosted, not by Robert Clotworthy, but by some cheerleader named Matty Blake, a radio personality.

Someone should tell this guy he has the job. He seems overly exuberant, hugging and high-fives all around. His exaggerated excitement seems to even rankle the Lagina brothers who show up for an interview on various topics he raises—usually for the negative.

His latest show was on Oak Island pirates. He interviewed various show people, like Charles Barkhouse and Gary Drayton. They give him insights because they usually are secondary figures without any limelight. After all, this is Marty Lagina’s production. No one elbows him out of the camera.

Apart from Matty Blake’s constant cheerleading patter, he shows elements of a lack of sense. He does one segment in pouring rain at the “smelly swamp,” and boasts that it is all part of the Oak Island experience. Sounds more like a production overrun.

 

Blake does raise some interesting points, and his latest on pirates looked at everyone from Sir Francis Drake to Captain William Kidd.

We must tell you up-front that our great-aunt Belle Walters grew up in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, and with her husband, my father’s uncle John, they went there each summer from the 1920s to the 1960s. Uncle John was also a 33rd degree Mason, quite a big deal, and they firmly believed the treasure belonged to Captain Kidd. Even as a kid, we heard this theory.

Blake spent a great deal of time trying to find locals who knew who Captain William Kidd was, without much luck. How the times have changed.

He also raised the issue of Captain Anderson, another privateer of the late 1700s who actually lived on the island for a time and may have built a ramp from his land to the ocean front. Gary Drayton felt this was important—and we always pay attention to what Mr. Metal Detector Detective states.

The show always ends with the Lagina brothers throwing cold water on Blake’s theories—and he thanks them profusely. We know who signs his paycheck.

 

Oak Island Swings for Strike Three

DATELINE: Gold Strike Struck!

IMG_4522  Lock’em up?

The Curse of Oak Island may be a union of boring contractors. Marty enters the abandoned search area and hears only crickets (so he says). No one has a clue that trouble was brewing among the dozens of hired workers on the heavy equipment.

How obtuse can these guys be? Don’t ask or you may wonder what else they aren’t seeing. Like the forest from the trees.

As winter seems about to overwhelm autumn, the longest season of the series about gold hunters in the Nova Scotia island has reached a point of The Road Not Taken. We are ready to jump on the sleigh and head for the nearest Yule log.

Rick Lagina in this 19th seasonal episode of season six has not had a eureka moment, nor an a-ha one either.

The gold strike turns out to be a labor union problem. The workers don’t show up—and the manager sheepishly tells the Laginas that this, at minimum, will be a three-week strike. It effectively ends putting your money in the Money Pit. Wait till next year.

You mean those friendly workers never once mentioned to the Laginas that there was trouble brewing?  Well, that wasn’t too nice, though Robert Clotworthy hastens to narrate that the low-ball pay had nothing to do with Marty’s business practices.

It almost appears Alex Lagina is on strike too. He did not appear except for a short fifteen second stand at the trough. Yup, it’s cold out there.

To wrap up the next few episodes, the remaining old prospectors will strike up the band to dig at Smith’s Cove.

Once again, the only good news came from Gary Drayton and his magical metal detector. He seems to strike iron every time: he locates a lock off a treasure chest, complete with key hole. The box is long gone, but this reminder gives a little hope that something is out there.

As for the rest of Oak Island’s crew: put a lock on it.

It’s Not Heavy Metal, It’s My Brother!

DATELINE: Leaden Episode

Skowronek Skowronek Saves Day!

Good grief, is this really episode 18? Summer in Nova Scotia only lasts twelve weeks.

A friend reported that every time she tunes in to the show, she thinks it’s an episode she already saw. Every week they find a coin and dig a hole, not always in that order. The Laginas always wear the same clothes, and it’s like looking at a rerun.

With summer’s end, it rains and pours more.

In case your sense of déjà vu is slipping, Robert Clotworthy will hastily repeat what he just said two minutes earlier.

This episode was three-quarters of disappointment as another hole in the ground turned out not to be the entrance to a vault of gold, or much else. Big timbers of oak and some leather teased the hunters. They have moved on because time is running out for the season.

It came down once again to Gary Drayton, called in at the last segment to perform his magic. Through some divination, he went to lot 21 which once was owned by one of the original finders of the money pit. There, he waved his metal detector and came up with a plum.

There, in two pieces, was a long strand of lead. He instantly deduced it was a match to the lead cross he found last season on the other side of the island. He also found a second piece, broken off, but fitting exactly to form a square hole. It is a duplicate of the cross.

How can he do this stuff?

They immediately called in Tobias Skowronek from Germany on the Skype. The metallurgist who looks like a minor also confirmed this lead was a duplicate from the Templar Knight mining operation in France. Stunning.

It saved the episode from wasteful time lost.

 

 

False Clues and False Positives on Oak Island

DATELINE: Post-Dan Blankenship

muddy mass of leather

Muddy Mass of Leather Deep Underground!

For three seconds before this episode began, you had a quick notation:  “In Memory of Daniel Blankenship, 1923-2019.”

There was hardly time to do much more at this point, with Dan having passed on two days earlier. We presume that in a few weeks there shall be a full-blown biography of his extraordinary efforts for half a century to find the treasure on Oak Island.

We know that old film clips and photos document much of his work from the 1970s, and much more is likely available to illustrate his intriguing life.

This too is the longest season of episodes on record: and they are digging well past summer—and the nasty, rainy, windy weather shows up in the hunter wardrobes. It is cold off the North Atlantic.

Perhaps the biggest revelation is to see how Smith’s Cove is flat and clear of all items as they bring in lidar to find anything underneath. The coffer dam is on borrowed time, and they must excavate soon.

The scientist did note an extremely large object was buried there, under what would be the sea and possible man-made drainage systems to flood the caves of the island.

Gary Drayton again showed his insights and acumen by locating a Spanish silver coin, likely minted in the 1700s.

The dredging also showed frightening promise: another bone fragment, perhaps human, chains, and large chunks of leather. It leads some to speculate that the slaves who worked the site were chained and left to die there.

Also coming up were enormous flat, human-hewn oak timbers that Drayton noted he had seen from old galleons of yore. Dismantled wood used to make a floor or roof to a chamber?

All in all, with a few weeks left in the season, we suspect that answers again will be withheld until next season.

Can it be on the 17th episode of the sixth season, we have Revelations 17:6? “The woman was drunk with the blood of saints when John saw her.”

Pour a tall one before Rick Lagina sees you.

Eulogy for Dan Blankenship

DATELINE: An Era of Treasure Hunting Passes Away!

95-years Dan.

Can the center hold?  For Oak Island enthusiasts, the answer has shaken the earth of the small Nova Scotian island. The heart and soul of the Curse of Oak Island has gone. He was 95 and lived a life of a treasure hunting adventurer.

As Emily Dickinson once said, “Because I would not stop for death, he kindly stopped for me.”

Dan Blankenship showed up now and then at age 95 on the sixth season of the hit series, still unwrapping up this season, and he was always the delight to behold. He was sharp, in seemingly amazing shape for his age, and offered perspective with gentle insights.

Yet, that was merely one surprising element of a man who was physically powerful, as old film clips show. He dug bore holes the old-fashioned way. He chased the demons of Oak Island for the glorious discovery of romantic lost treasure.

Now and then the Lagina Brothers consulted him, trotted over to show him some progress on the hunt for gold on the island where he called home. He would even drive up in a golf cart to observe the progress fifty years after he worked the area.

The season now airing on History was filmed this past summer, and Dan survived another harsh Nova Scotia winter, but he will not be present to see another spring and a seventh season.

He died on a day when Jack the Ripper’s DNA seemed to indicate the solution to that long -standing century-long mystery. He died on a day when NASA released photos of an asteroid that might hit Earth in fifty years when none of us oldsters will see the event.

Dan Blankenship did not miss finding the treasure. His spirit was the treasure, the optimistic and grand character of the human heart. Fans of the show shall miss him but he was a century of the best of mankind to grace the series, the hopes of finding a pot of gold, and enjoying life.

How the series will honor him is not yet clear, but already he gave the series and history its integrity.

‘Detour’ on Oak Island

Rare Beefcake on Oak Island

 

DATELINE:  Off Road Sites

With the season six crashing all around them, the Lagina Brothers have nowhere to go but down. Hence, they decide at this late date to make a new entrance to the Money Pit. Yeah, it’s episode 16 on Curse of Oak Island, and time is running out until next season.

If anyone is always running late on Oak Island, it is the Lagina brothers. We noticed again this week how they show up, drive up, or cavalierly drop in on a site at Smith’s cover, or at the bore holes, like they are early birds to do some work. However, there are always other members of the team already hard in labor: Laird, the archeologist, Billy on the backhoe, or Jack Begley, man of all trades.

Our two favorite treasure hunters dominated this episode:  Alex Lagina and Gary Drayton. They seldom work together. If public reaction we have measured is any indication, Gary Drayton is by far the most respected member of the series.

Gary found the seeping red dye in the previous episode while casting an eye over Smith’s Cove, and this time with his trusty metal detector, he found yet another rusty old stabbing tool, which he labelled “very, very old.”  He later found an “inge,” which in American translates to an hinge.

An old blacksmith expert noted that the spear weapons were actually crib spike, used in construction. He thought the hinge was for a heavy door, as on a church, or perhaps on a floodgate. He put it as early as 1600.

As for Alex, he is a certified diver and went looking for the weird objects seen by lidar in the previous week. One was an anchor and a mysterious object that was triangular and pointed toward the island. We had a brief shot of beefcake as he poured into his diving suit.

He also trotted along to the blacksmith to retrieve those findings.

As the summer winds down, so does the season’s episodes. We know there will be no definitive results, and we know that we will have to wait until next November to learn what they are.

 

 

 

 

Oak Island Die Hard and Dye Harder

DATELINE: Approach/Avoidance

95-years Amazing Dan Blankenship!

We are at episode 15 of the sixth season with the Curse of Oak Island, and we are still going strong. Each season is longer, and our patience is growing thinner.

Shake, rattle, and rolling, the Money Pit sink hole will be stabilized, presumably, and filled in to be able to continue boring down.

However, this week’s big info is that lidar off Oak Island may have discovered some entrances or openings under the ocean. The gang, including Alex Lagina and mysteriously returned Peter Fornetti, join Marty to hear the findings. That thread was quickly dropped to begin another dye job.

Several years ago, the brainstorm was to use green dye to see if there were drains leading to the treasure vault. Green did not mix well with water, making it impossible to see.

This time the hunters will use red dye (not sure if it’s #2, or the blend often used in Rick Lagina’s hair).

Incompetence was again blamed on the island curse when hoses tangled as water was sent into bore holes with the red dye.

To everyone’s pleasant surprise, 95-year old Dan Blankenship drove up in his golf cart to take a look at the activity. When he tried this stuff, he did it on a shoestring (figuratively). Now there are drones that has to amaze him as fly-over inspections monitor the island for red dye.

However, it is old Gary Drayton who spots a rusty color water appearing out of nowhere. Marty Lagina wants to be the kibosh, but chemical testing of the colored water indicates the dye has seeped to Smith’s Cove, proving there is a drain system to booby trap the treasure vault.

Small victories set up the final few weeks of season six.

 

Curse of Oak Island: One Big Sink Hole

DATELINE: Indefinite Suspension

fashionplateOak Island Fashionplate

Oak Island’s unsafe ground has voids and tunnels that have been compromised by diggers and flooding over at least two centuries. It seems a surprise that no one figured that a sink hole might send the entire treasure hunt and hunters down to a watery grave made by Captain Kidd.

Oak Island is one big hole in the ground, except when it comes to History Channel ratings. Then, it becomes Mt. Everest.

If the latest gaffe is unforeseen and inevitable, we might well agree with Rick Lagina that the hunt for whatever is there may be nearing completion yet again, without success.

Every generation’s technology fails until another era makes people feel that they are the champions to find the answers.

The 14th episode of season six is the “Voyage to the Bottom…” and they have not yet hit rock bottom.

Perhaps the most ridiculous moment was a nighttime visit by Rick, tethered, as he crawls into the sink hole, causing even more caving earth. They yell for him to get out: it’s not easy to move fast when you are beyond a certain age. The Chappel Vault might become Rick Lagina’s mausoleum, as he faced the prospect of becoming the seventh curse victim.

We had suggested last season that Rick throw himself down one of the shafts, and he nearly did it this time.

Other bad news was that what they thought was a piece of bone turned out to be slag (buried 170 feet where no smelting operation ever was done). Other leather parchment turned out to be tree bark. It’s pure Oak Island.

The good news for the week had to do with finding parchment or rag paper with red pigment on it: it seemed to be as early as 1300 in origin.

Also, lidar and sonar searches of the bay water around the island showed some anomalies and an anchor. Another tunnel entrance or drain system could be 100 feet off-shore. Intriguing.

Yet, we were most impressed when Alex Lagina showed up in an $800 Arc’teryx wilderness jacket. He has taste and good looks.

Oak Island: 6th Season Paranormal Episode!

 DATELINE: Curse of Oak Island Ghosts!

bone fragments  Bone Fragments Discovery.

Why has there not been more paranormal investigations on Curse of Oak Island? You could watch this episode in Season Six that is not part of the regular rotation of treasure seeking. In it, Matty Blake, the cheerleader and annotator for the Lagina brothers, takes charge.

In the final few moments of the show, the Laginas listen to electronic voice recordings made at locations—and they resoundingly dismiss it. Yet, they were the ones who found bone fragments from two different 18th century men buried 170 feet below the surface. Talk about haunting.

There is no onerous voice of Robert Clotworthy on this show, but the over-exuberant Blake is in charge. He talks to the two Blankenships about their ghostly encounters. Son Dave Blankenship relates having seen a black mass at different times on the island. It floats around ominously, and others have also recounted it.

Many reports center on a large hound with red eyes that seemingly roams the island at night. It is right out of some Conan Doyle story.

One of the intriguing details focused on an early researcher, Nolan, who never spent a night on the island, leaving at dusk.

A paranormal expert from New York, Brian Cano, visits the swamp area and various bore holes where they do record noises, including an echo from deep within one drill spot. What was it?

Mysterious lights and other phenomenon might be better suited for other TV reality shows like Ghost Hunters, or UFO Files. There are many reports of mysterious lights and people who disappear, like alien abductions.

If there is a curse, rejected outright by the Laginas (who nonetheless use the notion to sell their show), it strongly indicates paranormal or UFO activity.

We admit our prejudice on this level, since having moved into a haunted house, we have experienced too much to reject what we once laughed at.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oak Island: Paper Chase #13

DATELINE: Parchment & Pigment

Dem bones Human Bonehead?

No, Professor Kingsfield is not lecturing this week, but the “Paper Chase” is definitely on as the 13th episode of season six.

Instead of Kingsfield, here is another dry academic, Randall Sullivan who has written a tie-in book about Oak Island the highly rated, History channel, cable series. He is allowed to shill his research on the show and is praised to high heaven for the Laginas.

No one claims the Laginas are silent partners, but pushing the book is lucrative (out of stock on Amazon), and published by Atlantic Press, no slouches.

Cheapskate Sullivan brings two copies of the book to the crew at Oak Island, letting partner Craig Tester sit there with egg on his face.

As for the findings of the week, big news includes a cement wall in Smith’s Cove, another piece of a dead man’s bone (likely one of Captain Kidd’s dead men not telling tales) from the bore hole, and parchment with red pigment on it. If Shakespeare’s original manuscripts are down there, they are soggy remnants of treasure.

On the positive side, 95-year old Dan Blankenship makes an appearance—and Alex Lagina has been reduced to chauffeuring author Sullivan around.

When Dan Henskee finds the bone fragment, credit is given to Jack Begley instead. Oh, well, being old is not always a good thing for original searchers like Henskee.

We still await carbon dating (suggested by Dan Blankenship) on parchment, wood from Smith’s Cove and other expert analysis of tokens and iron arrow shafts. Francis Bacon seems to be emerging as the culprit, over Templars. With a record number of episodes ordered for the season, we probably can wait a few more weeks for results.