Silence Patton: Victim of Assassins?

DATELINE:  General Nuisance?

Patton

As the supposed first casualty in the Cold War, General George S. Patton is the subject of a 2018 documentary that raises the theory that he was murdered in 1945. He was about to return to the States as a whistle-blower on the ineptitude of the war strategy. This intriguing documentary is called Silence Patton.

A military truck, driven by a drunken soldier, hit the limo with Patton in it, as he prepared to return to the United States. He was left in a state of paralysis and soon succumbed (some say poisoned) in a German hospital.

What are we to make of this? Patton himself, as he was pulled from the wreckage of the accident, insisted that no soldier be blamed. He called it an “accident’”. He seemed intent of leaving this verdict. It seems a bit peculiar.

Why would anyone want Patton killed? And why?

The film certainly finds no shortage of enemies for the officer who slapped a soldier for cowardice (one, it appears, of many, as he used this as a morale technique). Stalin and the Russians hated him for his virulent anti-communism, and perhaps they wanted him dead. He wanted to expose American weakness for allowing Stalin to run amok.

He was prepared to expose Gens. Eisenhower and Omar Bradley as incompetants who let the Stalin forces take over half of Europe in the waning days of the war. He was horrified that the Russian soldiers raped and killed large numbers of German women in a genocidal take-over.

Yes, there is plenty of unpleasant actions behind and around the death of the great, opinionated officer. He was boorish, brave, and outrageous. It was his guts, but someone else’s blood that he shed. Yet, he was a man of his soldiers. The meandering quality of the documentary is unforgivable.

A steady stream of Patton apologists feel he has been wronged by history and by his contemporaries. How much can be believed? It an age of fake media and a blustery president, there may be some revisionism here. Trump’s name is never mentioned in this film, but he seems to loom over the proceedings as a disciple of Patton.

 

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70 Years After Roswell

DATELINE: Happy Anniversary, Aliens70 years later Major Coverup of What Exactly?

You might shrug this off as just another rehash documentary, with the usual gaggle of conspiracy theorists. Nick Redfern is most notable of the experts here.

Yes, it may be low key and low budget, but the film is straight-forward and wants to cover aspects of the notorious UFO crash that started the phenomenon that has grown into Ancient Aliens and extra-terrestrials as a cottage industry.

A fresh look with basic honesty is always refreshing, and you will have it here.

And, still we found it illuminating despite being shown that all-so-familiar newspaper headlines about the flying disc recovered by the military that was retracted within a day.

The documentary analysis takes each chunk of the story in hand. A few explanations may surprise: not the tales of witnesses being threatened, but that some of the early participants, including one military officer, started the Roswell UFO Museum.

Of all the startling bits, we were most bowled over by the fact that the producers were not allowed to fly over the crash site with a drone by the military. Seventy years later, they don’t want you to see a 30-foot gash in the ground.

The other eye-opener was the notion that the government actually had disabled “volunteers” on a craft that crashed, and they wanted to hide the human guinea pig concept.

Also, people became ill in Lincoln County shortly after the crash, which was considered cholera, but might have been radiation poison.

The 45-minute film is worth every moment of your attention.