Season 2 End of World War II Gold

DATELINE: No Gold Strike This Year!

With the series finale at two separate episodes, there seems to be little to accomplish with Gen. Douglas MacArthur took out 20,000 tons of gold to help finance the CIA without government oversight. A once-promising series evolved this year into another fake reality series.

They also learned that there is grave danger digging where the CIA has its bank account.

So, with some trepidation, we are looking to see if there will be a third season. If John Casey has his way, he will expend his team and find a new group for the third season. Last season’s smoke bomb indicates an opening in the mountain—and they go to it. They cannot figure out its purpose, but it is clearly an air tunnel likely built by American POWs, misused by the Japanesee.

There is now another heavy machine digger with no explanations of where the others disappear. Ruining equipment and pushing men are considered a blow to the search, not idiocy. For two or three episodes, they had a woman operator, but she is inexplicably absent suddenly.

With Rick Hurts issuing hard labor orders to the operator, we can see why she was relieved of duty: it would look like harassment if she were the underling. We are left wondering how many people have been brought into this “covert” treasure hunt.

Bingo and Chuck McDougald warn them to be careful. Deaf ears? There are no bodyguards or armed protectors—and Casey hears of the threats to their operation undaunted. That’s no surprise as this guy has now proven himself to be obsessed and insensitive to anything that will undermine his goal.

Following immediately came the grand finale of season two, looking almost exactly like the end of the first season.

Locating an ancient temple is surely an archaeological treasure, but they don’t care. Go for the gold!

Five months of digging has led to a key moment that may contain either a treasure chamber—or a third profitable season.  Several maps are on former American Clark Air Force Base (no digging there) and in a historical tourist area of Manila.

To hedge bets, Bingo surveys all the islands and finds one on a corresponding map, 700 miles from Manila and directly south of Tokyo. It is next season’s goal, having figured the expense and time at the Luzon mountain are about to be undermined.

Helicopters, always black and unmarked, ominously survey the mountain discovery. The cast went to the far off island to avoid any confrontations, if they ever really existed except as a device to heighten suspense.

Lost Gold Claims a Shocking Discovery

DATELINE: Shocking Allegations!

MacArthur & Truman!

 

With all the hyperbole and exaggeration around this season and the unpleasant and arrogant John Casey who did in his first-season team, it is no surprise that there is a “shocking discovery” on the latest episode.

The expert miners involved once again overrule Casey, feeling he has jumped to conclusions about how easy it will be to find the treasure vault.

The father-son miners are concerned that their robotic dig of a parallel tunnel may uncover gases that can overcome the men.

At the second dig, they have found rope that is clearly not old enough to be from World War II. It is blue nylon, indicating that their dig is not the first. They are finding modern digging tools. Another successful treasure hunter would not have publicized his discovery.

They now think one of three boxes of gold or treasure has been found and taken, but two boxes remain—based on the McDougall map.

Bingo Minerva is hot on the trail of rival searchers back in the United States. He has been encountering dire threats about their safety and a conspiracy that supports covert operators. A New York Times reporter suggests that it is General Douglas MacArthur may have been one o those who found treasure. He at least shared the info with President Harry Truman.

Allegedly Truman and MacArthur used the treasure money to fund U.S. operations against the Soviet. They had over 20,000 tons of gold at their disposal.  It is certainly shocking to learn that the POTUS and his Supreme Commander were taking treasure at will for their nation’s covert operations.

They are warned this search is dangerous. Then, there was carbon dioxide and monoxide that can kill fairly quickly. They have to flush out the poisonous air.

There are sensational shocks this week for sure.

Picking at Bones on Lost Gold

DATELINE: Billons 

  John Casey

 

At long last, half-way through the second season, the show returned to the promise it evinced last season.

Here, some real discoveries intrigue the viewer. We still think there are unfilmed events behind the scenes. When Bingo Minerva meets up with Dr. Chuck McDougall, he is too open and too ready to share his long-prized treasure maps from the Ferdinand Marcos archives. He was likely paid generously for this.

McDougall was dismissed as a “treasure hunter” with Robert Curtis in the 1980s, but he was a respected scholar with high level connections in the Philippines. However, President Corazon Aquino pulled his right to search after a short time. He warns Bingo that there are dangers—people will kill and steal the treasure. Well, a couple of billion dollars of bullion will do that.

Back in the Luzon area, some idiocy continues: like trying to move a heavy excavator across three miles of muddy road. Impossible.

The most interesting of all was finding teeth and bones in the pivotal tunnel. John Casey shuts down the operation immediately, and the miners were clearly uneasy at finding the remains. Whose graves might these be? Casey theorized Japanese left prisoners buried alive in these tunnels.

Bingo is authorized to make a deal with Dr. McDougall for his authenticated maps. He wants 1% of the treasure for his info. We cannot calculate how many millions that will be.

As a side-note, John Casey goes on a tirade in one scene and explains that no one and nothing will stop him in his quest to find this treasure. AT least now we know what happened to last year’s team. There is no comfort for his partners this season.

 

 

Nitro Stops Lost Gold of WW2 (sort of)

DATELINE: Three Ring Circus

 Terra cotta bomb casing.

After about a ten-minute recap of the previous two episodes, you are ready to hear that the incompetence and needless risk-taking is only just underway.  Lost Gold of World War II is continuing on a new path of following in the footsteps of the defunct series about stolen Civil War gold last season.

Like Oak Island, the key is to have three digs going at once-and flipping back and forth for the attention deficit crowd. Under a waterfall, John Casey opines that it may be impossible to dig 300 feet, and in another hole where miners find concrete, it’s a dead end

Most interesting is a tunnel discovered by last year’s team. The father-son miners have already misidentified a knife, which now indicates gold hunters were already there. They also start to find hints of nitroglycerine. This volatile stuff could blow up at any time, but they are undaunted.

Last year’s bomb expert, Chad Higgenbottom, came by and located terra cotta booby traps: metal detectors would not help as these were made because of metal shortage during the war. He suggests K-9 bomb sniffers because of the dangers.

Other digging with the new motherly excavator operator hits bedrock and a dead end too.

Back in the States, Bingo learns more interesting details from the owner of the Las Vegas Sun who did studies on earlier treasure hunting by Ferdinand Marcos. But, the high point is always bomb sniffing by the dog named Drago. He gave them an all-clear, perhaps the most reliable info of the night.

No, there was no mention of what happened to Peter Struzzieri, last year’s brains behind the treasure hunt.

 

 

 

Secret Tapes Spur Lost Gold of World War II

 DATELINE: Look Out Below!

 You Got Bingo.

Having been given secret and allegedly dangerous tapes about the Marcos search for the stolen gold of the Japanese, the series seems impervious to any dangers. Lost Gold of World War II  may have danger lurking everywhere from anti-American haters to Japanese booby traps.

Not only that, we have the usual idiocy by the gold hunters:  they dig at a waterfall tunnel during a monsoon—and are surprised their equipment becomes mud-bound.

The solution to the search will be to do a certain kind of excavation, but John Casey rejects this because the technique will poison the town water supply for the locals. Yes, that would be bad public relations for foreign visitors, digging up the local area on an obsessive quest.

Talk about Ugly Americans: the new team seems a step down from last year’s older, but wiser crew.

Thankfully, there is Bingo Minerva back in the United States, consulting with real academic experts and learning what’s back in Luzon. He reports via Skype that only 20% of the stolen artifacts were recovered and that the treasure could be a compendium of diamonds and other precious stones,, all encased in metal tubes.

As for the so-called experts consulted in the area, they call themselves “historians” but never give degrees, titles, or university associations. These self-anointed experts throw out years of experience as Marines or other para-military soldiers. It is dubious to say the least. Their expert dismisses the idea that a discovered knife is from World War II. He places it from the 1980s. These treasure hunters are so off that we begin to wonder what else they have wrong.

Moreover, the tech team of twin bearded young men, Colin and Max, complain about the weather and terrain, while the father and son miners seem to revel in their condition.

An unusual expert, a woman tractor excavator, named Michelle, is one tough bird, but manages to become stuck in the mud. Only after a day of crisis management, ineptly by Casey’s younger brother, does she manage to wiggle the expensive equipment out of danger. No jokes about women drivers, please, because there is a dearth of women on these “boys’ adventures series.”

The series seems to hang on man-made error as the cliff-hanging routine of the season. Not a good start to a once promising series.

 

 

 

Lost Gold of WW2 and Lost Members from Season 1

DATELINE: Legend of the Lost Members?

 

 Satellite image of gold under waterfall?

There is more than lost gold here: just about the entire cast from the first season has disappeared, perhaps kidnapped by aliens, or ordered to walk the plank by survivor John Casey. He’s now in charge.

You may suspect History Channel cleaned house and did their demographic diligence to rid the show of weak links.

Peter Struzzieri, the old man of last season, and braintrust, is gone. There is a reference to “Pete” but no other explanation of what happened to the gang that worked so hard to locate a tunnel—and were just about to enter.

The only member to escape the wrath of John Casey is Bingo Minerva, likely because the head researcher is never in the Philippines. He is still digging up background info for the audience.

Meanwhile, the show describes the second season as a “new team and new technology.”

Well, the template granddaddy, Curse of Oak Island, isclearly at work. Civil War Gold has sunk in Lake Michigan, and replacements in the World II quest now include brothers, John Casey and Rob. It seems the Lagina model at work. There are also father-son miners, and a couple of geophysicists with matching beards, who are too precious to do hard labor.

Yet, this was the best new show of last season. It seems now hard pressed to replace Struzzieri who made contacts with secretive people, but a new oldster must perform that re-connect. He’s told that he is liable to be murdered for the information, but is undaunted.

There are unknown agents of the late dictator Marcos, the CIA, and other mysterious people who want to put their hands on over 200 billion dollars’ worth of stolen loot. Yes, that’s motivation.

A rogue terrorist unit of communists wants to rid the Luzon area of various American interlopers, which does not sound too good for the gold hunters who discover their tunnel is now lost under cave-ins.

There is new technology from Russia, no less, some kind of nuclear magnetic resonance that can find gold deposits underground from a satellite. It shows some glowing locations, which unfortunately are about 300 feet under a waterfall. Well, we know what the problem will be this season.

We are willing to give this a go for the second season because its followup Skinwalker show is a mess to behold.

 

 

 

We Got Bingo & Lost Gold Too

DATELINE:   Eureka?

bingo

 Bingo Minerva.

The lost treasure among the many treasure hunters from the new History Channel series Lost Gold of World War II is their at-home in the U.S. researcher and Man Friday.

His name is Bingo Minerva, and he has the most interesting and least stressful job of the pack. He interviews old gold hunters and experts in myriad evidence, then skypes his response back to the Luzon Island boys.

The elderly gold diggers on Luzon Island seem to be sweating more than usual in this episode. We worry for the health of old-man Peter Struzzieri.  The only smart one is the expert in reading Japanese markers: he seems to remain back at home base in the air conditioned bungalow, aka shack, of the treasure hunters.

As per usual, they take the wrong road constantly: deciding to dig next to a waterfall—and then becoming amazed that water leaks into their air vent pit.

The other brainiacs have decided to dig down into the area where drill bits have been worn to a nub. The volcanic rock is, of course, impenetrable.

The upshot is a waste of time and a waste of one episode: the sole interesting point was made by Bingo who interviewed an aging attorney who represented a man who sued Ferdinand Marcos for stealing millions of dollars in hidden loot.

There is a hint of danger in that the CIA is also after the Japanese treasures hidden in some remote mountain tunnel.

As the series will go on hiatus after the next episode, we suspect we are about to be left hanging for a year.

 

Hitler’s Concrete to Hide Lost Gold?

DATELINE: Lava Flows Over the Gold

HItler greets Yamashita Hitler Greets Yamashita, 1940.

The limited first season of this fascinating little reality treasure hunt show, Lost Gold of World War II, is moving to a climax that will make us yearn for the second season, if History Channel so agrees.

Like the Oak Island show, this one is driven by weather. Cold snow ends the season for Nova Scotia, and on Luzon Island, the monsoon season will bring this hunt to a finish for now.

So, they are racing like old race horses. Indeed, when they bring in a machine to dig down 40 feet, the old leader Struzzieri notes that the equipment is older than he—and nearly as shaky. We’re talking 70 years or more.

We wonder why they would guarantee problems with faulty equipment. Of course, the ground penetrating radar spares no expense—with an expert flown in from the States to find a void or tunnel.

Then, they hit a snag: not the old drill bit, but the old typhoon, Category 5, second worst in history.  Peter Struzzieri assures us that Grandpa is okay after the storm, though they never really go to check on their key witness.

It is a mere one-day delay.

About 40 feet down, they hit what they theorize is Nazi concrete, bunker strength. They even have old colorized newsreel footage of Hitler and Yamashita shaking hands. We cannot imagine that pure racist Fuhrer would give the inferior Japanese anything.

Indeed, when Bingo travels to Minnesota for a concrete expert, he blows up the theory by stating they hit lava, rather common in the Philippines.

Our intrepid American hunters disbelieve this, and they drill down harder than the Lagina brothers—and we are left with a draining hole leading to—you guessed it—a tunnel.

Hmmm. And only one episode left for the first season….

Lost Gold’s Backdoor Episode

DATELINE: Grandpa Knows Best. 

Luzon meeting Luzon Meeting of the Braintrust?

Finally, in the fifth episode of trudging through the thick, humid, sticky jungle, the intrepid American heroes of this series admitted there were bugs eating them alive. Lost Gold of World War II holds your attention.

We saw sweat dripping several times over the past few weeks as they chop through thick underbrush, bemoaning how the Japanese soldiers managed.

Well, we heard in a throwaway line that prisoners of war and others did this heavy work—and were paid by being entombed in the mine shafts where the gold was hidden.

We were also bemused to see the true oldsters of the expedition going out on this show:  Peter Struzzieri, the ostensible brains back at basecamp and a spry 70 year old, and Martin Flagg, a less spry senior expert in Japanese secret society symbols were dragged out.

Peter Casey was clearly concerned that this was an arduous trek. But, the so-called carved turtle rock was something they must behold: it’s alleged to be a direction marker to a backdoor to the gold.

We did laugh when Struzzieri noted that the younger guys would go on ahead. No one is under 50. If you stick around for the closing credits, you will note that these scenes are all “re-enacted,” for cameras.

You also have to marvel when they go to “grandpa” who is the ancient source of wisdom (sort of their version of Dan Blankenship on Oak Island).

Like our gold diggers on Oak Island, these guys like to jump to conclusions. Thank heavens that Bingo Minerva is back in Texas, taking a shell casing to a military historian.

The ammo is actually dating from 1908 and American intervention in the Spanish-American conflict of 1898. If you want rationalizing at its best, the searchers speculate that World War II Japanese soldiers were using old American ammo by war’s end.

Oh, well, this stuff is still fun.

 

Lost Gold Beneath the Gorilla Head

 DATELINE: 4th Episode of History Channel Series

marker Rock Gorilla Carving!

Continuing to be intriguing, Lost Gold of World War II has hit upon a modern, but dangerous, quest for lost treasure. Yamashita’s gold may have been secretly buried 75 years ago, but there are plenty of dangers today.

Like Oak Island, the treasure hunters are discovering plenty of potential flood gates and other dangers. We worry about them far more than other shows because these guys are all fat and old.

It occurred to us that they are not missing many meals. And, the latest one-shot expert is a diver from the American military thirty years ago. The search team leaders seem unable to find anyone except old soldiers who never die but put on big pot bellies.

These oldsters are scrambling up and down slippery rocks in humid weather—and it shows, thus giving us concerns that might not exist if these hunters were 25 years younger.

Their discovery of more markers carved into the overgrown jungle leaves proves that someone felt compelled to leave notations to tease treasure hunters.

In the meantime, back in California, Bingo has discovered one of the coins the team found was from 1980, but the other is clearly pre-1940.

One huge marker, a gorilla head, is carved beneath a waterfall, and it looks upon another smaller marker that designates treasure boxes. So, they take a chance to go down to the pool below.

Beneath that may be a cave entrance. Technology continues to save the day:  poles that emit sounds to indicate metal 18 feet below the surface—and pumps to empty out a pool in short time.

If events seem to be moving swiftly and with more results than on Oak Island, it’s true. Only if the show is renewed for another season will we reach the drag out levels of Oak Island.

So far, this is neatly paced and has us enthralled.