Big Deal on Ancient Aliens

Dr. Jason Osequeda

 DATELINE:  Tall Tales

Welcome to the Land of the Giants.  In case you are wondering where it is, Ancient Aliens puts the epicenter around the Mediterranean Sea—but these big people spread out, as you cannot keep a big man down.

Noting that the big stone monuments that have survived for thousands and thousands of years were built without tools, they had to be picked up like pebbles on the beach and put into walls, pyramids, and other ancient structures. Only your biggest folks could handle the job.

These big people, giants stood as much as 100 feet tall, which means the dinosaurs would have had a tough time fighting off these hunters.

The general run of giants shrank to more chewable size of ten to twenty feet. Talk about big feet.

Though some believe a race of giants were some kind of mutation that did not last, Ancient Alien theorists expectedly believe these creatures came from outer space to redistribute the planet’s makeup.

They cite legend and myth with some academics who discuss the Cyclops, one-eyed monsters, as a real nationality. If we recall our Greek mythology, the Cyclops met by Odysseus was not too bright, which may explain their soon to be extinction.

Malta seems to be the epicenter of civilizations thousands of years before known developments of the Biblical era. The megalithic structures bear a striking parallel to the Sumerian pyramids, allegedly built by giants from outer space.

Speaking of Lost in Space, actor Bill Mumy who produces Ancient Aliens nowadays used a clip of him as a child star shooting a giant Cyclops he encountered on the pilot episode of his earlier series.

The series uses a couple of new Ph.D.s to tell the stories, including Dr. Linda Enix and Dr. Jason Osequeda, both are most interesting and it might return for future shows. Dr. Bruce Fenton has become a regular.

The most outrageous claim of the episode is that Adam, the first man, was a giant, likely the son of Titans.

 

 

 

Hitchcock’s Little Bang!

 DATELINE:  Short Suspense Subject by the Master!

Mumy boy

What a treat to find ourselves looking at the last half-hour episode of his TV series actually directed by Mr. Hitchcock himself.

Sandwiched between Psycho and The Birds, he gave us a gift of a timeless tale about dangerous weapons in the hands of children. “Bang! You’re Dead” is a minor gem.

Once again, he used a child star who would soon climb to more legendary fame. Back in 1954, he came up with Jerry Mathers as the little boy who discovers the dead Harry in Trouble with Harry. Mathers later went on to more trouble with Leave It To Beaver Cleaver.

In 1961, he picked out Billy Mumy, half-a-dozen years before he made a star burst on Lost in Space. Mumy was an extraordinary child actor, and his brilliant performance makes the episode all the more chilling. In one scene, while adults around him talk, he keeps an unblinking eye on his uncle, just returned from Africa and promising a special gift to the boy.

In an age when all the boys were pretending to be cowboys and had hats and guns, Mumy finds a gun and bullets in his uncle’s suitcase and presumes this is his gift. He puts one round in the chamber and switches his toy gun for the real one.

Spinning the chamber as if playing Russian Roulette, he begins a journey around the neighborhood, figuring to plug those people who give him a hard time: and there are plenty of candidates from the mailman to an annoying father and daughter at the supermarket.

Hitch zeroes in on the little fingers stuffing more bullets into the chamber and spinning away, making each shot more likely to hit a mark.

The excruciating suspense is nasty as each incident makes the growing menace more frightening. At the least, the episode ends with seven years of bad luck.

Extraordinary short film is from the seventh season of Alfred Hitchcock Presents.