Oak Island 7:18: End is Near (sort of)

DATELINE: Last Drill of the Year

 Laird Nivens & Marty Lagina.

It almost sounds like Bible verse. We are up to and surpassing season 7 and episode 18, where there is now a connection between the swamp and the Money Pit. Was there any doubt? You never known on Curse of Oak Island.

Now, is there any proof?

Dr. Ian Spooner brought another colleague to the swamp, where they agreed that the mercury present is odd and not natural. They are of the mind that the swamp was used as a blue clay mine. Three hundred years ago some workers, pre-Mayflower, were seeking blue clay, which has a density and even religious significance in some societies.

The largest drills so far are arriving from ROC excavators to do a final month of burrowing into the Money Pit. No expense is being spared, but will they also endanger themselves? We wouldn’t be surprised as the obsession seems to be growing as fast as the budget for the series.

You know common sense has gone when Rick Lagina takes a sip of brackish water to determine if it is salty in the swamp.

The other new evidence is at the ruins of the home of Samuel Ball, the former slave who became the richest man in Nova Scotia in the early 1800s. Speculation that he found treasure has centered on him for decades, and now ground penetrating radar finds walls and chambers under his former home. But permits are needed for excavation: which means next year.

Dan Henskee and Dave Blankenship push the honorary button to dig into the Money Pit with new heavy-duty equipment. How much can be retrieved before the season ends is the question. After all, you can see the heavier coats on the searchers. We are coming to the end of another year of endless clues and constant teasings.

 

 

 

Irony Lost on Civil War Gold

DATELINE: Follow the Red Brick Wall!

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“A Void at All Costs”? That’s what the episode is titled.

Yikes, when the show names its own poison, you have to wonder how serious it is when it comes to playing around with truth and history. Of the trio of gold hunt shows on History, this one is the lamest. Irony is lost here, not gold.

In a continuing effort to malign people who are dead, History Channel gives us more of the same. Collapsed tunnels from the late 19th century connects the two houses of banker partners who lived across the road from each other. How nefarious is that?

More troubling is the connection between a man who captured Jefferson Davis, Confederate president, and the treasury of the South—to Charles Hackley, the banker who hired the Union officer’s son.

Modestly poor men suddenly open banks. It does raise an eyebrow.

As far as permits go to salvage Lake Michigan, we again have been misled. The process only leads to a federal appeal—and a more deliberate delay. Clearly the Michigan connection is a dead end for now—and the series must move to other areas, literally.

The suppositions are built on sand, or brick walls that front air pockets. Follow the red brick wall. The tease of Wilkes Booth and Jesse James being involved in the story has dried up. They cannot break through the walls because it could bring down the house, which would put them over-budget.

There’s enough dubious dullness that Alex Lagina is not on Oak Island, but back at his father’s business. He gave them any excuse to flee the Civil War hoax.

But, we are connecting dots not meant to lead anywhere. Maybe next week, Gary Drayton will show up and find a coin. Going nowhere is a theme on this show, and they are off on another tangent next week. We still don’t know what the curse is this show’s title refers to.