People’s Princess v. The Queen

 DATELINE: Ten Years Later

Queen & Country

As docudramas go, Helen Mirren’s movie about Queen Elizabeth and Princess Diana is among the best.

Now ten years later, we took another peek at the film called merely The Queen, directed by Stephen Frears and written by Peter Morgan. It has that wry detail of Diana looking back at the Queen with an accusing stare.

We don’t know how the creators know what tears, angst, and emotions, were expressed when the Queen was alone.  Mirren provides all this and more. Yes, it surely makes an exciting and intimate film performance.

This is the best of Mirren’s many queen roles, and this is the best of Michael Sheen’s many Tony Blair roles. Blair has to save the Queen from herself and her noblesse oblige family. Mirren’s Queen is witty and ultimately practical, whether this is true of the real people in the movie or not.

Actors re-enacting surely provides powerful insights into the tragic event of Princess Di’s death and the reaction of Her Royal Pains in the afterlife.

We recognized an impressive Roger Allam this time, from his Endeavour TV series, playing the Queen’s personal assistant. James Cromwell is his usual acerbic character as Prince Philip.

Mirren has many stunning moments, such as her shock when the public applauds Di’s brother after giving her eulogy. The Queen’s speech left more to be desired, even with a great actress delivering the same words.

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Tom Brady Does Dallas

DATELINE: Vindication Tour Continues

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One big surprise permeated the game between Dallas and New England.

Tom Brady was on his keester more times than the previous regular season games combined.

Hardy Greg, the womanizing beater of the other gender, seemed pumped up for a game of hacky sack—and Tom was in the bag. His sack runneth over.

Indeed, it was sack time—and Brady didn’t look to happy to have his pristine uniform soiled with the perspiration of the inspired Greg Hardy.

In the first half Tom may have lured the Cowboys into a stupor. They were knocking him down like they might win the game. Of course, once Brady developed his sea legs, the game was over. Sally can sell sea shells down by the seashore, but no one cans a tuna like Tom. The Cowboys looked like mincemeat on the surf n’ turf menu.

It was not a pretty picture for Jerry Jones on his mammoth Jumbotron. The man who wanted Tom suspended for this game had to look at the big picture—and his team was not in it.

The obligatory camera shots of the billionaire owners showed Jones looking bored and disinterested in the game. Of course, fans who came to see this exhibition spent a larger percentage of their wealth on a Sunday afternoon compared to Jones.

When Tom Brady spiked the ball after running it into the end-zone, he was a monster yelling at the crowd. Godzilla could not have done it better. All those pent up feelings over nine months clearly needed a release.  He seemed to scream at the Dallas crowd like he was a giant stomping on the papercutout village known as Dallas.