Lost Gold Claims a Shocking Discovery

DATELINE: Shocking Allegations!

MacArthur & Truman!

 

With all the hyperbole and exaggeration around this season and the unpleasant and arrogant John Casey who did in his first-season team, it is no surprise that there is a “shocking discovery” on the latest episode.

The expert miners involved once again overrule Casey, feeling he has jumped to conclusions about how easy it will be to find the treasure vault.

The father-son miners are concerned that their robotic dig of a parallel tunnel may uncover gases that can overcome the men.

At the second dig, they have found rope that is clearly not old enough to be from World War II. It is blue nylon, indicating that their dig is not the first. They are finding modern digging tools. Another successful treasure hunter would not have publicized his discovery.

They now think one of three boxes of gold or treasure has been found and taken, but two boxes remain—based on the McDougall map.

Bingo Minerva is hot on the trail of rival searchers back in the United States. He has been encountering dire threats about their safety and a conspiracy that supports covert operators. A New York Times reporter suggests that it is General Douglas MacArthur may have been one o those who found treasure. He at least shared the info with President Harry Truman.

Allegedly Truman and MacArthur used the treasure money to fund U.S. operations against the Soviet. They had over 20,000 tons of gold at their disposal.  It is certainly shocking to learn that the POTUS and his Supreme Commander were taking treasure at will for their nation’s covert operations.

They are warned this search is dangerous. Then, there was carbon dioxide and monoxide that can kill fairly quickly. They have to flush out the poisonous air.

There are sensational shocks this week for sure.

Lost Gold Pivotal Turning Point

DATELINE:  Paranoia Grows

That gold in the Philippines has reached a breaking point. It’s ground-breaking, according to the History Channel. Well, yes, when you drill 900 feet underground to a waterfall, that surely qualifies as groundbreaking. Lost Gold of World War2 is rapidly winding down its second go-round.

Of course, both this show and the Skinwalker are finishing up with mysterious helicopters circling overhead. There is a lack of creativity on these shows as they fake danger. Both History shows are using the same alarmist hint.

Once again we are facing one of those needle in a haystack digs  If they are in the wrong spot, you may have to return next year to find anything.. And, of course, this leaves John Casey undaunted. One of the three digs is a collapsed mine shaft that gives off sounds of continuing collapse.

Another dig has the promise of unusual stone not indigenous to the Luzon area. And, the 900 drill can be knocked off course by inches. Have we learned anything from the Curse of Oak Island?

A remote digger will tunnel through the collapsed area –-and Bingo sends Casey a map that he is skeptical to accept. If you can’t read the clues, what are you doing leading a treasure hunt?

However, the discovery of French royal red marble—obviously brought to the mountain from Europe may indicate a connection between the Germans and Japanese during the war, in cahoots to hide something.

The paranoia grows when unexpected government (or purportedly official) come to overview the work. After several warnings, John Casey decided to bring in armed security guards.

Casey also discusses the map with Chuck McDougall who confirms that his maps are accurate.

 

 

 

 

Picking at Bones on Lost Gold

DATELINE: Billons 

  John Casey

 

At long last, half-way through the second season, the show returned to the promise it evinced last season.

Here, some real discoveries intrigue the viewer. We still think there are unfilmed events behind the scenes. When Bingo Minerva meets up with Dr. Chuck McDougall, he is too open and too ready to share his long-prized treasure maps from the Ferdinand Marcos archives. He was likely paid generously for this.

McDougall was dismissed as a “treasure hunter” with Robert Curtis in the 1980s, but he was a respected scholar with high level connections in the Philippines. However, President Corazon Aquino pulled his right to search after a short time. He warns Bingo that there are dangers—people will kill and steal the treasure. Well, a couple of billion dollars of bullion will do that.

Back in the Luzon area, some idiocy continues: like trying to move a heavy excavator across three miles of muddy road. Impossible.

The most interesting of all was finding teeth and bones in the pivotal tunnel. John Casey shuts down the operation immediately, and the miners were clearly uneasy at finding the remains. Whose graves might these be? Casey theorized Japanese left prisoners buried alive in these tunnels.

Bingo is authorized to make a deal with Dr. McDougall for his authenticated maps. He wants 1% of the treasure for his info. We cannot calculate how many millions that will be.

As a side-note, John Casey goes on a tirade in one scene and explains that no one and nothing will stop him in his quest to find this treasure. AT least now we know what happened to last year’s team. There is no comfort for his partners this season.

 

 

Shatner, 4thTime a Charm on Oak Island

DATELINE: Ben Franklin after Treasure?

 Ben Franklin.

This time William Shatner is taking on the take of the American Revolution using the treasure on Oak Island to finance the fight against the British. The irony is that they used Canadian territory—and even tried to draw Nova Scotia to join the States.

Samuel Ball, the former slave, was given his freedom for working with the Brits—and reportedly found some of the treasure within 20 years of moving to Oak Island.

Shatner hosts “The Founding Fathers.”  To fight the richest empire of the time, the United States used Benjamin Franklin to try to locate funding.  Because of his ties as the Grand Master of the Masons, he could use this connection to find money.

What’s interesting the French ties to the Templars had transformed into freemasons. That was the role and connection that Franklin used for the American Revolution. These ties actually went back half a century to Nova Scotia. These French military wanted to take the territory away from the British.

The French placed a “second” treasure on Oak Island in the mid-1700s. The Templars went to Scotland where they were not persecuted—and they soon delivered their secret treasures to New Scotland (Nova Scotia).

The Laginas tell Shatner that there is no proof, but there is circumstantial evidence. It does allow the Lagina Brothers to dig out their visits to Scotland to give Shatner some information, including the discovery of the lead Templar cross on Oak Island.

Shatner provides the authority and brings the gravity of his celebrity to the theories. He relates how Franklin and Thomas Jefferson owned thousands of acres in Nova Scotia—and wanted it to be part of the new nation.

George Washington may also have a connection, however oblique, to Oak Island. Did the Americans finance their freedom fight with Oak Island treasures?

 

 

Secret Tapes Spur Lost Gold of World War II

 DATELINE: Look Out Below!

 You Got Bingo.

Having been given secret and allegedly dangerous tapes about the Marcos search for the stolen gold of the Japanese, the series seems impervious to any dangers. Lost Gold of World War II  may have danger lurking everywhere from anti-American haters to Japanese booby traps.

Not only that, we have the usual idiocy by the gold hunters:  they dig at a waterfall tunnel during a monsoon—and are surprised their equipment becomes mud-bound.

The solution to the search will be to do a certain kind of excavation, but John Casey rejects this because the technique will poison the town water supply for the locals. Yes, that would be bad public relations for foreign visitors, digging up the local area on an obsessive quest.

Talk about Ugly Americans: the new team seems a step down from last year’s older, but wiser crew.

Thankfully, there is Bingo Minerva back in the United States, consulting with real academic experts and learning what’s back in Luzon. He reports via Skype that only 20% of the stolen artifacts were recovered and that the treasure could be a compendium of diamonds and other precious stones,, all encased in metal tubes.

As for the so-called experts consulted in the area, they call themselves “historians” but never give degrees, titles, or university associations. These self-anointed experts throw out years of experience as Marines or other para-military soldiers. It is dubious to say the least. Their expert dismisses the idea that a discovered knife is from World War II. He places it from the 1980s. These treasure hunters are so off that we begin to wonder what else they have wrong.

Moreover, the tech team of twin bearded young men, Colin and Max, complain about the weather and terrain, while the father and son miners seem to revel in their condition.

An unusual expert, a woman tractor excavator, named Michelle, is one tough bird, but manages to become stuck in the mud. Only after a day of crisis management, ineptly by Casey’s younger brother, does she manage to wiggle the expensive equipment out of danger. No jokes about women drivers, please, because there is a dearth of women on these “boys’ adventures series.”

The series seems to hang on man-made error as the cliff-hanging routine of the season. Not a good start to a once promising series.

 

 

 

Lost Gold of WW2 and Lost Members from Season 1

DATELINE: Legend of the Lost Members?

 

 Satellite image of gold under waterfall?

There is more than lost gold here: just about the entire cast from the first season has disappeared, perhaps kidnapped by aliens, or ordered to walk the plank by survivor John Casey. He’s now in charge.

You may suspect History Channel cleaned house and did their demographic diligence to rid the show of weak links.

Peter Struzzieri, the old man of last season, and braintrust, is gone. There is a reference to “Pete” but no other explanation of what happened to the gang that worked so hard to locate a tunnel—and were just about to enter.

The only member to escape the wrath of John Casey is Bingo Minerva, likely because the head researcher is never in the Philippines. He is still digging up background info for the audience.

Meanwhile, the show describes the second season as a “new team and new technology.”

Well, the template granddaddy, Curse of Oak Island, isclearly at work. Civil War Gold has sunk in Lake Michigan, and replacements in the World II quest now include brothers, John Casey and Rob. It seems the Lagina model at work. There are also father-son miners, and a couple of geophysicists with matching beards, who are too precious to do hard labor.

Yet, this was the best new show of last season. It seems now hard pressed to replace Struzzieri who made contacts with secretive people, but a new oldster must perform that re-connect. He’s told that he is liable to be murdered for the information, but is undaunted.

There are unknown agents of the late dictator Marcos, the CIA, and other mysterious people who want to put their hands on over 200 billion dollars’ worth of stolen loot. Yes, that’s motivation.

A rogue terrorist unit of communists wants to rid the Luzon area of various American interlopers, which does not sound too good for the gold hunters who discover their tunnel is now lost under cave-ins.

There is new technology from Russia, no less, some kind of nuclear magnetic resonance that can find gold deposits underground from a satellite. It shows some glowing locations, which unfortunately are about 300 feet under a waterfall. Well, we know what the problem will be this season.

We are willing to give this a go for the second season because its followup Skinwalker show is a mess to behold.

 

 

 

Oak Island Ends 7th Season with $ Whimper

DATELINE: The Price is not Right.

 Star is born.

When Gary Drayton is doing the History Channel promos for the last episode of the season, you know they have a new star on their hands.

It’s raw November as the season ends, and the digging time is over. The so-called Fellowship’s final dig becomes too dangerous and is curtailed because of collapsing tunnels. It is the worst news of the season.

Attention immediately shifted to the swamp. It was a docking area and a man-made site, and Dr. Ian Spooner brings the most interesting news. He dated tree branches and rushed to give them the dates of his findings.

The swamp was created in 1200 A.D. which seems to be Templar. It is a stunning historical event, though this is secondary to finding gold in most eyes.

Marty Lagina resisted any idea of the swamp being important, but now he has found that answers are there. If the swamp was made in 1200, you have something momentous, far earlier than the Columbus discovering America notion.

Human activity could include tunneling 800 years ago. There is a stronger sense that there were several treasure burials. A second group may have taken advantage of their knowledge about the early excavations.

If there is cold water, Marty Lagina has the right to throw it on this exploration. He now states that additional digging for the Money Pit may now tally into the tens of millions. At what point does the treasure wash out by the cost of retrieving it?

Should they dig down 250 feet and create a concrete circle in which you may find the treasure?  It seems beyond feasible. How much profit can you dig out of this series?

A memorial to honor Dan Blankenship was created immediately, no matter what else happens. Dan’s not able to be there, but his presence will remain.

 

Shatner & Shakespeare on Oak Island

DATELINE: Shatner Returns to Treasure Hunt

 Cold Day in November!

We know how much everyone enjoyed William Shatner on Oak Island, but he must have also enjoyed it because he has come back for the final night of season 7.

His theory is worthy of the UnXplained,and we fully concur with him.

There is a fairly sharp start that indicates that Shakespeare may have been borderline literate: his father and mother were illiterate and only middle-class. His own education was fair, not royal and not comprehensive.

So, Shatner takes some relish in debunking the Bard and suggesting the real writer was a man with credentials, like Sir Francis Bacon, member of the Elizabethan court. There may even be several authors, as Shatner hints.

Cyphers in the original folio have intrigued researchers that there is something that matches Nolan’s Cross on Oak Island. In fact, Bacon was connected to Knights Templar through Rosiecrucians—and he may have known of the secret vaults on Oak Island—and chose to bury his Shakespeare originals there.

One can find that The Tempest may be confessional in terms of Bacon burying “my booke.”  If overlaid on the final page of The Tempest, you find a spot that would correspond to the Eye of the Swamp on the Island.

We were amused when Rick Lagina called Bacon the Michelangelo of his day: if history is correct, they were almost contemporaries as Michelangelo’s death crossed the date of Bacon’s birth. Technically, he was right.

Parchment was found over 160 feet below the earth. Bookbinding material was found near the Money Pit deep down.

Even the Laginas seemed intrigued that Shakespeare’s first folio is there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What? Another Week of Season Seven?

DATELINE: Deadend Kids?

 Ball’s Tunnel?

It’s like lingering on a deathbed. Yet, here we are with another weekly survival on Curse of Oak Island. We are hanging on by a dendro count by our fingernails. Even Alex Lagina is starting to look shopworn, even with his filthy millions and clean hands.

Mother of Mercy, is there no one who will rid us of this meddlesome priest? Oh, wait, that’s another series altogether. If this continues, we think Gary Drayton will begin seeing the ghost of Hamlet’s father on the ramparts.

He does find a crowbar in what seems to be the true Money Pit. Legge thinks it is an anchor or pulley. He always impresses Alex. Gary realizes he needs a bigger metal detector.

Every time Carmen Legge says “1700” we begin to think it is a glitch on the audio. So, he shocks them by saying, “Middle Ages.”

At 120 feet below, there is again more coconut fiber. They also locate a metal shield that was used in 1931—not exactly the original diggers. But it does indicate that they have reached the end of searcher efforts.

Next should be original buried stuff. However, at this point, the crane pressure brace has broken. It’s a setback as the season comes to a finish. It does mean something is there causing the grinder to be blocked. But they are so desperate they are working into thedarkness.

This forces them to turn to excavating the home of a man who was once a slave but ended up super-wealthy. Samuel Ball had something tunneling under his house. Samuel Ball’s lot may have been over a much older vault. Something big may be apparent because Alex shows up and a camera is snaked deep into the tunnel.

Another Oak Island Season Baiting the Hook

 DATELINE: Y’all Come Back!

  Late Bobby Restall.

For Oak Island, winding up in its seventh season, we know the annual state we reach at this point:  it used to be called the “cliff-hanger,” but on Curse of Oak Island, it is baiting the hook for the next year.

They know how to grab us and make us come back again. You can start to count the little developments that are meant to give us hope.

Is the empty-hand something we can identify again? You cannot take much comfort from finding more bits of bookbinding leather. Whatever documents that were there, are now clearly shredded to nothing. How cynical we have become, left by years of dashed hopes.

We are now relying on the sonorous tones of Robert Clotworthy to keep our hopes high. A new geophysicist Jeremy Church has arrived with news. He has found a 13×13 foot shaft or teardrop in the Money Pit, deeper than expected.

A botanist comes to the swamp and finds that a tree stump there, Dr. Roger Evans takes samples but says it is cork oak, that is indigenous to Portugal, not Nova Scotia. Knights Templar versions from Portugal were likely in Canada.

Alex Lagina brings the two surviving Restall family members to the Island. Rick Restall recalls his older brother Bobby who lost his life at 18 in a shaft. It is poignant and perhaps the most evocative of the treasure hunt moments.

You can always count on Gary Drayton to make the biggest find and the greatest grab to our interest: another ancient pickaxe. They find enormous wooden dowels, highly powerful connective lumber which may have Roman numerals carved into them.

We learn again that Rick and Marty Lagina are always late to the show. They seem to drive up after everyone else is already there and working.

Yup, we are hooked for another year.

Oak Island Redux (again) 7th Season

DATELINE: Petering Out Pathetically

X marks the spot, as usual. Gary calls it the biggest “smash and grab” in history. It is Gary Drayton who once again makes the biggest discovery of the show: a bobby trap nail.

They are looking for the money and finding mostly old wood, but is it the cover for the treasure? When Gary finds a large needle in a claystack, he jokes about it. However, expert Carmen Legge makes a shocking comment upon observing it.

Legge thinks it was a booby trap item. It was a form of a punji stick: an object that could have, hundreds years ago, been covered with a poisonous substance. The big three go to visit Legge: it is Gary, Marty, and Alex.

Legge noted these were sail repair needles or spikes, called a marlinspike. It is more indication that a ship was wrecked in the “swamp.” He finds the needle was part of a booby trap that could be from a time as early as 1500—and it was part of a planking that was meant to do damage to human flesh.

Other spoils are cleaned out of the wash table. They continue to find leather of book cover thickness. Yet, they also find a hinge. Of course, the optimists want to say it is part of a treasure chest.

Of course, again, the deeper they go, the less they find. So, they did not find the Money Pit. How many disappointments and dead ends can there be in a treasure hunt.

The biggest news of the night is now a contest, the Oak Island Sweepstakes, to win some kind of memento from the Lagina Brothers. Oh, my, talk about following in the steps of P.T. Barnum. Oi vey, it’s the viewers who are cursed.

 

 

 

Ring-a-Ding on Oak Island

DATELINE: Empty Shaft

Rick Lagina compares their efforts to Winston Churchill’s “blood, sweat and tears,” as we draw to a close. Brit Gary Drayton is more akin to another ring-a-ding moment, as we find the season running out in Nova Scotia, and nary an Ark of the Covenant to be seen.

With the winter coming inevitably, they have now the biggest shaft ever.

The two who have found so much over the past few years, Gary Drayton and Rick Lagina come together for one last search of the swamp. These two are quite lucky in tandem: and there appears to be one last bit of luck in those metal detectors.

They find an elaborate ring, highly embossed, but without jewels. It has a flower or sunburst with some silver. One expert places it at pre-1730. They bring in a gemologist named Lewton-Brain. He finds two repairs to enlarge it. It is Spanish and likely belonged to a woman.

They also find part of a metal shield that was buried over 100 feet in 1936. Below this is likely original shaft.

Also coming out is large bit of human bone—and barrel casings! Something is so close that you know you will have to survive the coronavirus to see what occurs next season.

The bone is large and likely human. Why is a large human bone buried over 115 feet below the surface?

They even find a keg part. Yet, they hit bedrock and nothing. Yet again. They suspect it “shifted” through earth tremors or whatever. They once again are more ready to step back to think. They need to go back to Dan Blankenship’s office in his house (left to his daughter, now resident).

Next season looks like another fresh start to find Money Pit (if it isn’t simply a legend).

There is more talk now of history, not of treasure. These set-backs are bringing us to despair.

Oak Island: Time Running Out

DATELINE: Reckless 7th Season?

 Mercury Dunk?

Dr. Ian Spooner shows up to assess another breakthrough in the swamp. Can it be some kind of megalithic creation that is manmade? Bigger is more desperate on Curse of Oak Island as we wrap up another season of empty-handed potential.

Big trouble is coming because the coffer dam must be removed within weeks, with the permit running out after one year. Not only must the dam be removed, but the area must be made to look as it was. Why can there be no extension of the permit? There is no explanation. Did they even try?

Finding a potential tunnel to the Money Pit means that Rick Lagina will go down on a bucket into the hole. If this seems a bit extreme and likely to be dangerous, we must recall that this is a cliff-hanger series with death-defying (or something akin to it).

Another lead artifact now has a strong mercury component, which suggests that Francis Bacon may have done some experiments on the manuscripts of Shakespeare. The lead also can be traced to the Middle East. More inconclusive but tantalizing hints. We are hooked again and reeled in.

Another curious discovery occurs at the home of original finder Daniel McGinnis whose root cellar was a secret tunnel, leading to something hidden. Because permits will not allow them to dig deeper, whatever treasure buried under the house cannot be excavated for a year in all likelihood.

If you want frustrations, they are everywhere this week. They have found more 1760s tunnels and shafts. Rick Lagina plans to go down in the bucket. They have to insist he come out before it caved in on him (which likely is his preference). Of course, Marty Lagina must put on a harness and goes down.

So they put a camera on the long-range excavator. Even that is inconclusive: we feel like we are no closer to knowing anything.

With time running out for this season, it becomes clear that a new sequel series is in the ready with the Lagina boys: it’s called, naturally, Beyond Oak Island.

Thee’s a sucker born on Oak Island every minute.

 

 

 

Water, Water Everywhere on Oak Island

DATELINE:  Still Waters Not Found

We have arrived at the 16thweek of the 7thseason. It’s clear they will find nothing this season.

But the coconut hair indicates that they are near the booby trap of flood tunnel. Out of the muck, Gary Drayton starts to find a couple of spikes from the 1700s. These were original people who were digging to bury something.

Also, seismic explosions from earlier this season and used to produce sound waves have created a map of voids under the surface of 300 feet. However, they find a linear tunnel about sixty feet near the Money Pit from the Cove.

Their excavation with a huge new machine obviously finds a flood tunnel. Of course, the cavalier digging means a cave-in, having unstabilized the area. It’s almost like they sabotage their own hunt to extend the season till next year.

So, they move to the eye of the swamp where they believe the Templars may have hidden something.

But Gary wants to go to the spots where Hurricane Dorian stripped away the ground cover. His hunch proves right yet again. So, once again, Rick and Gary find some piece of lead that may have etchings on it.

But the swamp has large deposits of blue clay, an water sealant that is there to protect and make watertight something underneath.

The highpoint of the show is Dr. Christa Brosseau’s return to analyze the spikes Gary found. Alex brings them to her for an elemental analysis. She delivers the good news that the iron has phosphorus, meaning it is 18thcentury. She thinks they were from Britain or Northern Europe.

We are delighted that Drs. Spooner and Broseeau are now the voice of academic insight on Oak Island.

Surely Templar on Oak Island

DATELINE: Coconut Fiber 

Ship in Swamp.

If you are among the faithful, your belief in Templars, treasures, and miraculous artifacts, may be about to be rewarded big time.

The show itself has begun to ask if the search is worth it. Yet, there is a major structure or more on the island. Both the Money Pit and Smith’s Cove are showing to be rich in evidence. The thinking finally is that the ocean was much lower at Smith’s Cove that made it easier to build giant structures that had no nails or fasteners.

The eye of the swamp may be pivotal. They think a major discovery of a Spanish galleon may be their reward. The possible ship is about 15 feet at the shallow end and over 50 feet at the other end. Ground penetrating radar presented an image.

Marty arranges to dig a major shaft into the Money Pit where wood has been found that is from 1620. They can do a safe dig eight feet across and 120 feet deep.

On another front, the Scottish immigrants came to Oak Island and wanted to use a prebuilt system to hide their Templar artifacts. They may have created the newer Money Pit. These Templars, aka Knights Baronet, were freemasons. In fact, many of the searchers were actually Masons.

It may be the original discoverers of the Money Pit were actually came with some knowledge of treasure. They knew what was there and why they went down over 30 feet.

Even more shocking, they discover an opening to a tunnel under the foundation of early resident Daniel McGinnis. Direct descendants several years earlier claimed there were treasure chests the original teen treasure hunter located. Back at Smith Cove, Gary Drayton jokes about a tunnel—but then they find one. It contains more coconut fiber—or something else! If that material is fiber, it could mean it is near the booby traps.

They return again to Carmen Legge, now a regular deliverer of amazing findings. He identifies this pipe pole as a boat hook.

However, the biggest news of the night has to do with the mystery fiber discovered in a strange new place. It turns out to be a shock from Dr. Ian Spooner: it’s not human hair. More coconut fiber indicates a flood tunnel. It was a filter and original work for the placement of treasure.