The Mad Mad Mandela Effect

DATELINE: Wild Theoretical Movie!

  Robin Lord Taylor.

David Guy Levy has directed, written, and presented us with a highly clever paranormal mystery movie. It’s able to straddle the world of presenting us with dubious Internet info interspersed with a fictional movie. It is highly entertaining and thought provoking.

A young father loses his daughter to a drowning at the beach—and goes into a philosophical crisis that upends his world. Indeed, he begins to think his world is simulated reality in an attempt to reach the spirit of his dead child.

It threatens his sanity and worries all those around him, including his gay best friend (Robin Lord Taylor, once again in a creepy performance).

The Mandela Effect is a theory that mass memory errors are not misremembered events, but seepage from a parallel universe (like Jif Peanut Butter, or it is Jiffy Peanut Butter—or is Mr. Moneybags called something else without a monocle here and now). We all have these strange false memories that cannot be explained.

Some of us are clairvoyant and may think we are part of the interdimensional brigade. You may not be seeing ghosts, merely interlopers from a parallel universe.

Particle simulations being what they are in computers, the hero Brendan (Charlie Hofheimer) is increasingly drawn into a parallel universe where everything is a Looney Toon. He meets the designer of a quantum computer at a local university, and it resembles the Monolith out of Kubrick’s Space Odyssey, and it may be exerting forces on events.

As a computer programmer, Brendan tries to overload the godly computer of quantum physics to blast through to a parallel universe. Considering its low budget, this is a a clever, intriguing, and ultimately thought-provoking sci-fi paranormal entry coming in at under 90 minutes of dangerous ideas.

 

 

 

Mysterious Works of Stanley Kubrick

DATELINE: Faked Moon Landing?

Young Kubrick.

This is the ultimate close reading of Kubrick’s oeuvre.Alas, the narrator is a nasally turn-off, whatever interesting and looney stuff he feeds us.

Yes, this one-hour biographical conspiracy movie seems to hint that Kubrick was assassinated for being difficult, for revealing too many secrets, and for being moral. Taken one at a time: Kubrick was a perfectionist who was used to fake the Moon landing(s), all of them.

He knew too many buried skeletons in Hollywood about pedophilia, and he was an enemy of freemasons, billionaires, and world controllers in government.

Yes, that will get you killed. Just ask Jeffrey Epstein.

There is an interesting opening sequence about young Kubrick and his development into a movie director. His singular idiosyncratic, autocratic self-controlling career began after Spartacus (which the documentary says he hated). It’s a great film, nonetheless.

But this doc thinks his greatest film is Eyes Wide Shut(which we dismissed as overwrought and overindulgent).

The narrator goes on the reveal all the people he offended with each subsequent film. He had to do 2001: A Space Odysseyas a cover for his work making the Moon landing footage that was shown to the public. Those pesky astronauts were laden with guilt and hypnotized, according to this film.

The Shining (misspelled in the film documentary) is rife with references to Apollo 11 and to child molestation in case you missed it. And, the examples are startling to behold.

His final film, Eyes Wide Shut,took 18 months to film, and when important people saw the finished cut, Kubrick was alleged to have been assassinated by lethal drugs to imitate a heart attack in 1999.

Then, his final cut was altered so as to not offend billionaire government powerful figures.

The documentary is as frenzied as those monkey-men, faced with a giant monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

 

 

 

Westworld 3, the Lost Season, Bites the Dust

 DATELINE:  Cliff-hung!

As Westworld wound down on its third season, it was clear that Jonathan Nolan was meandering without any sense of direction to his creation. The series had nowhere to go—and went there with empty shoot-out and fight scenes.

A coda after credits turns out to be the most interesting part of the show, which some could have missed: we see William confront himself as Man in Black, and we see decommissioned Bernard, covered in dust, likely years later. So, that is the teaser for season 4.

Two, not one, major karate fights between Maeve and Dolores (Miss Delos) seemed to end with their deaths: except no one in this series is ever truly dead.

The fights seem now to recur with all the regularity of Ali and Frazier.

William also seems to be trying to reform himself, sort of, to save humanity, in the same destructive way that Dolores wants to save automatons. It’s pointless as the world outside Westworld devolves into anarchy.

Some odd details seem to indicate that everyone has forgotten where they came from:  Lawrence, (Clifton Collins, jr.), shows up in haggard form to save his “friend” Bernard. But. His friend for all season two was William (Ed Harris) who runs off without seeing him. This may be a loose end for season 4, if we stick around.

As for a litany of loose ends, you are left with tatters of William, Bernard, Dolores, and whoever Aaron Paul is supposed to be:  presumably the new star of the series.

With everyone professing to save humanity, one wonders why the simple acts of kindness Dolores recalls are meant to save us all.

Whatever the series will become next season, or in its subsequent years, will not be the Westworld  of the movies, or of the first two seasons. This third season has truly been a lost season, meandering blindly for some purpose.

Dolores’s war on humanity comes to a fitting non-conclusion at the end of season three, especially since there are now three more seasons on the HBO docket. We can sleep at night knowing these talented actors, writers, and directors, will be gainfully employed for a few more years.

 

 

 

 

 

  Westworld 3.6, Serac, See Rac Run

DATELINE: Breaking with Pinky 

 Williams 1 & 2

We doubt the series can recover its equilibrium now that it is on a path where everyone is a host and no one is a guest. Robots, Robots, everywhere, and not a human to be entertained.

Jonathan Nolan’s Futureworld took a couple of steps deeper into the abyss of bleakness, and it ain’t pretty, no matter how clean the future streets are looking. That in itself is a tip-off that what’s real may not be what you see.

This episode is called “Decoherence,” which apparently indicates the series is now a step away from incoherence.

If there is redemption in this episode, it can be found in the group therapy session of William (Ed Harris). Now committed to a mental institution, his hallucinogenic therapy includes a hilarious session with all aspects of his past self: boy, young man, man in black, business tycoon, and mental patient.

This allows Jimmi Simpson to return for one bravura recap as his character of William. It leads to cynical villain William realizing he is indeed the hero of his own life.

As far as Ed Harris is concerned, he is not happy with the role and its turn of events. He signed on to play the Man in Black—and he may bail on the series if it continues. He was so unhappy that he broke Jimmi Simpson’s finger in their big fight scene.

The other major development that may turn into an interesting plot maneuver is the alteration of Tessa Thompson’s Charlotte who had begun to identify with the human side more than ever. Once crossed, and crossing that threshold, she may become a woman scorned: truly more dangerous than Maeve.

What may be converging here is a means to save Westworld from sure destruction on several sides. What it ultimately changes into could set us up for another season, or a neat ending to the proceedings.

Genre, the Drug-Addled Westworld 3.5

DATELINE: Our Least Favorite Episode in 3 Seasons! 

 Aaron Paul & Evan Rachel Wood.

The show Westworld  is now literally out of its world, out of its mind, and officially should have a new title. Going back decades, we loved the original Yul Brynner movie and even the not so good Peter Fonda sequel. We loved Jonathan Nolan’s first two clever and sharp seasons. We loved his Person of Interest.

Something has gone awry. This week’s episode was chaotic junk, with high speed car chases and drug-addled characters killing each other. We were not impressed to find Mr. Nolan slumming his Westworld to a dismal futuristic, misanthropic world where AI will eliminate real humans.

Apart from all else, it was so distasteful. And, the cast was so limited that we missed so many of the great characters who showed up for cameos a few weeks ago. Perhaps Nolan plans to have a grand finale in which all appear like in those Faulkner novels where all his favorite characters show up for a final bow.

It does seem to be the end of this series. Maybe Nolan and his partner Lisa Joy have run out of interest and ideas. We hope another project will return to the roots that Jim Cavaziel gave us in Person of Interest. There is no person of interest in this new season.

This new leading man, Aaron Paul, is an intense actor playing a rather dull character. No, there is no love interest with Dolores who is all business, and her job is chair of Murder, Inc.

There are three more episodes, came one reminder. Whether we shall be able to stomach any or all of them only the weeks ahead shall prove. We are most disappointed, having anticipated this show for a year.

 

Westworld’s Version/Vision of Hell

DATELINE: Robby the Robot Need Not Apply!

 Ed Harris Looks for a Cut Throat.

Number Four of Westworld III  is a lulu. Perhaps the highpoint of the night is a fight between Evan Rachel Wood and muscleman Luke Hemsworth. It seems in our new age, a good fight among equals includes some give and take between the sexes as a little later Thandie Newton enjoys a good roust.

As for the series, in its mercurial way, remains cryptic beyond even its usual standards. In the fourth episode, we finally see the ravaged leftovers of Ed Harris, or William, who had been obsessed with Dolores from the start. Whether he is done for, or will come back, only four episodes left will tell.

Now, he is being played by other parties, haunted by the ghost of his dead daughter (or is she another robotic version sent to drive him all the way to the mental hospital?)

It seems a little early for everyone to receive his come-uppance, and whatever secrets Dolores is harboring, using all who enter her realm, there are several spearhead opponents—Maeve, Bernard, and possibly William. You can never count anyone out in this show where apparent death to robots means you’ll be back next week.

We are now so far afield from the original setting that it is hard to know where this vapid, wealthy future shall lead. We are not sure the series has anywhere else to go as we rush head-long into a robot apocalypse.

Jonathan Nolan has surprised us before, but he may well have overreached his play with this season of his intellectual treatise on the meaning of life and AI.

 

Westworld 3.3, Even Robots Get the Blues!

DATELINE: AI Goes Bananas

One of the Hemsworths.

 We are back to mad robotic Dolores and her plan to take over the human world. She has found an ally in human Caleb, who apparently is taking the place of James Marsden who died last season (if robots die forever).

This week is cryptically called “Absence of Field.”  Its absence will not make you nostalgic for previous seasons.

In the Tessa Thompson subplot, we have the robotic charade version of Charlotte Hale now running Delos Corporation. Alas, she is informed that some version of a Howard Hughes billionaire, the richest in the world, is buying up their stock.

This is the employer of robotic Maeve who is being groomed to do battle with Dolores to put the automatons back in Westworld where they belong. This week Thandie Newton and Jeffrey Wright are off on their subplots, likely to return next time.

We miss Luke Hemsworth who has bulked up over the past year and now is a little muscle robot.

If you are lost and confused, this is part of the chess match Jonathan Nolan plays with Lisa Joy to show you that dumb viewers are watching mindless sit-coms on another network.

In the meantime, robot Charlotte is having stress pangs—perhaps controlled the spirit of her dead human counterpart. Charlotte’s six-year-old son senses this is nothis mother.

This child-parent motivation has now gripped several characters: notably Maeve and now Charlotte, as impostor robots seem to feel actual biological ties. And, thrown in for good measure, we also have a mother-son relationship with the real person of Caleb who seems to have an inordinate amount of machine in him.

Whether these turn out to be red herrings, or plot keys, you know only that Dolores holds the key everyone seeks.

 

 

 

Westworld 3.2 Shows Nazi-world

DATELINE: Episode Two of WWIII 

You can’t keep track of the androids without a scorecard. They are everywhere, and we might even call them Replicants, but that’s another movie called Blade Runner. Same idea, different off-world rebels. This show is called Westworld III, and you may be lost in the escape from robotic Centerville. They don’t want to call it world of Nazi, so it’s Warworld. No, we didn’t see a Trump lookalike cavorting there, either as a host or a guest.

We’ve been a bit confused (who isn’t?) when normal humans are taking on dangerous roles as bodyguards, etc. Why are the robots not here in spirit?

Since everyone seems to have a duplicate robot version, powered by a dirty powerball, everyone should theoretically be back for another season. However, the man behind the curtain is the wizard of Westworld, named Jonathan Nolan, and he decides if you go over the rainbow, or are simply deleted.

So, don’t grow despondent if your previous favorite character is nowhere to be seen—like Thandie Newton. The actress now shows up as an incongruous black woman in Naziworld. Who knew?

All journeys end up back at Westworld—where we find Maeve, Bernard, and a couple of humans. One surprise is that one of our favorite humans turns out to be another robotic programmed automaton. Who knew?

Somebody knows that Maeve is an agent of rebellion because they are trying to entice her with her former human friends to tell them what Dolores is up to. Failing that, she seems to be the robot recruit of the month to lead opposing forces to stop Evan Rachel Wood’s mad automaton attack on human existence.

In case you are wondering why the robots are looking older, we figured out that most of the cast is in their 40s, and unique robots, they cannot hold back time. However, stars like Thandie look marvelous for the given age.

So this is the set up for the shortened season three.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Radius, or Radiation?

DATELINE: Instant Classic!

 Klattenhoff acts puzzled!

An independent film made in Manitoba has the distinction of being a fascinating fantasy-sci fi-thriller of most unusual quality.

Radiustakes its simple plot and never exceeds its tight grasp on the situation.

Supernatural? Science fiction? Fantasy? This film defies categories and transcends all of them.

Radiusmanages to hold our curiosity and shock us with a lack of monsters, UFOs, or other junk you’d expect. Special effects are minimal, but have a fascinating power that reminded us of those 1950s sci-fi thrillers.

Two people with amnesia are hopelessly tied to each other. If they go outside of a parameter of fifty feet, one emits a deathly energy that kills any living creature.

Diego Klattenhoff and Charlotte Sullivan are the essential two-actor cast. All others are doomed to some mysterious death ray almost immediately. Klattenhoff also served as producer on the picture.

Trying to figure out what’s going on never violates your intelligence quotient. It grows steadily—and the revelations are more and more disturbing. If there is a paranormal, inter-dimensional connection, it has provided justice and redemption for the main character. It is morality coming from some esoteric alien force.

We cannot stress enough how surprised we were at the high-quality production, direction, acting. Some viewers were apparently bothered that the film did not devolve into the usual clichés.

We enjoy such discoveries and love to share them. Take in this film.

 

Hynek Sticks Out His Neck

 DATELINE: Men in Black Revealed?

 Mystery man in black.

Not one week ago, or less, we saw Ancient Aliens episode on Men in Black that featured the son of Dr. J. Allen Hyneck telling audiences that his father believed that the men in black existed—but he himself never had any encounters with them.

This week on Project Blue Book, we have our faith in accuracy tested again. Before you can say opening credits, a Man in Black (Ian Tracey) kidnaps Dr. Hynek.

History Channel channels Ancient Aliens and Project Blue Book together on Maury Island. What’s next? Men in black on Oak Island?

They must have erased his memory bank, which grows more bankrupt with each week of season two. One gives Hynek a major concussion, out cold for a prolonged time, and offers him aspirin.

It now falls to pipsqueak partner Captain Quinn (Mike Malarkey)  to locate his missing associate. He must re-team with the black CIA operative Dan Banks (Jerod Haynes). What he reveals is that the Men in Black are, in fact, rogue remote viewers who left the agency after what they saw through precognition.

Dr. Hynek’s wife Mimy (Laura Mennell) ( is also an adept spy and continues to insinuate herself into investigations.

Unfortunately, these clairvoyants cannot see too much, and are easily tracked down. If you can find a needle in a haystack without any paranormal skills, Captain Quinn can find Dr. Hynek in the middle of the woods without a compass.

So, it appears that CIA is the true enemy of Blue Book, not space aliens. We have no answer about the missing time in the lives of Quinn and Hynek some episodes ago.

 

 

Food of the Gods: Yum-Yum, Eatum Up!

DATELINE:  Blood to Let?

  Platter splatter?

Whether you consider the menu of godly appetizers to be forbidden fruit, Ancient Aliens offered us a repast of great delectable items.

Yes, our favorite show about those ancient space creatures who fiddled with our DNA has turned our stomachs upside down with the apple of knowledge.

Forget Jennie Craig, dieters. “The Food of the Gods” is what you need on your shopping list.

Forget salt. Aliens apparently have an aversion to salt, and when one contactee provided the CIA and Project Blue Book with a cracker a generous alien provided, it was salt-free.

Can you make manna on your Cuisinart? Or do the crackers of aliens fall from heaven? When the episode begins to suggest that blood-drained animal mutilation is tied into immortality, you begin to see ET as a new variation on Dracula. Swallow hard, Adam’s apple.

Yes, ambrosia is some kind of fluid or food that helps you travel for centuries on space craft. Eating it on earth helped Adam, Moses, and Noah, live to be about 1000 years old. So, Ancient Aliens is hot on the trail of the magic elixir.

Yes, aliens farm blood out of Homo sapiens. Yes, we have no bananas.

It isn’t long to jump to trans-substantiation or making the blood of Jesus out of wine. It would appear that ancient aliens need this stuff—and it is what will sustain humankind when they venture out into space

The problem with the series is that it often forgets its previous findings. Yes, there is a supply of blood to be let by abducted people, but the aliens originally came to Earth for its gold deposits.

There is your ambrosia, manna, wine of gods, soma, and all the rest on Gilligan’s Planet.

 

Islands of Fire: Hawaii & Tiki

 DATELINE: Hawaiian Tourists from Outer Space

Can it already be the twelfth episode of the 14thseason? And, if we are near the end, who can blame David Childress from taking a vacation to Waikiki? He’s not the only tourists: it seems creatures from around the universe have been dropping in for thousands of years for a fun time with genetic engineering.

Ancient Aliens knows how to enjoy the atmosphere of paradise.

Also on this episode as his guide is Dr. Michael Salla who has written extensively on UFOs, and he admits that he had no idea about the ancient history on the volcanic islands when he came here to live.

There are wooden carved Tiki who resemble the Gray beings so often depicted as kidnappers and keepers of lost time. There is also a grand history of beautiful goddesses whose anger is not a trifle.

Now we know where all those Hollywood movie plots came from. Salla talks about the Akua who were lesser beings, like the Grays who did their bidding. It’s all pre-Hawaiian—as they prepared to make civilization and a human race.

Expert from the Joseph Campbell Archives, Dr. Jonathan Young is around again this week, always giving a mythological take to the proceedings. He describes a kind of Hawaiian leprechaun: small, magical beings.

It all goes again to show that these basic creation stories may be taking place in a different hemisphere and with a different race, but it’s all the same in the wash.

What Childress discovers is that Hawaii is a hotspot, a gateway, a portal, that may open up to time travel throughout the universe as well as the planet.

We also commend Robert Clotworthy, this time for pronouncing all Hawaiian names with adept style.

Time Travelers in 1964

DATELINE: Lost & Forgotten Gem!

Foster & Hoyt Great Supporting Stars!

IB Melchior is hardly a name to be lumped in with the grand auteurs of long-ago: we think of Orson Welles, but there were others like William Cameron Menzies—and IB.

He wrote, directed, and produced, slipping into American International studios at the end, but keeping up high quality on a low-budget.

The Time Travelers is a joy to behold. Move over, Irwin Allen.

His sleeper is a take-off on The Time Machine and other sci-fi classics of the 1950s. With unusual intelligence, he put together a minor movie with a TV-generated cast of cast-offs: there’s an aging Preston Foster, off bad TV after a weak leading man life in the 1930s. He has a pointed imperial beard and wears an occasional monocle as the steady scientist behind a time travel machine.

There is Phil Carey, looking pauchy even at his peak of TV work as the assistant. You have white haired John Hoyt, taking his hair color cues from Brian Keith, as Varno, leader of a futuristic tribe of nuclear war survivors.

And there is Steve Franken, fresh off playing the Dobie Gillis nemesis, Chatsworth Osbourne, as the boyish (he was 34) foil. We never realized just how short he was.

Throw in a guest appearance from Forrest J. Ackerman, whose paranormal documentary by Paul Davids is The Life after Death Project. Here he suitably appears at the paranormal portal to the time warp.

The film features rovers on Saturn’s moon, Titan, discussions of exo-planets, and the kind of odd creatures that H.G. Wells was fond of using for troublesome survivors.

You might be surprised at how the effects work quite well in a simple manner before computer generated spectaculars. And, you do have real actors trying to keep a straight face.

It’s a wonderful little sci-fi classic that we dismissed back when—and suddenly have re-considered in old age as something a bit more special. If you love time warps and seeing a movie speed up and recap in one minute, you are in for a treat.

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Aliens & Reptilian Agenda!

DATELINE: Puff, That Magic Dragon?

grand daddySo’s your old man!

We are moving post-haste into the 14th season of the classic series Ancient Aliens, and we have found ourselves bogged down in the dregs of the downward spiral of the reptiles below.

Before you can say, “You little snake in the grass!”  we found ourselves knee deep in frogs’ legs.

If we listen to ancient alien theorists, you’re talking about your grandfather.  Yes, it’s true: our favourite show about space creatures has now turned over a new rock and underneath you will find another iguana who is a distant relative.

According to this show, Reptilians seem to be part of our DNA, and according to this week’s episode, they seem to be part of our triune brain too!

Tracing reptiles, usually in the forms of demons, not angels throughout culture and history, David Childress and Giorgio, et al,  seem to be swatting at dragonflies!

It now seems that snake in the garden of Eden was playing games with the genetic makeup of Adam and Eve. Talk about worms in an apple!

Ancient Alien theorists want to trace the giant growth of the human brain 30,000 years ago to aliens putting RH Negative into our blood. As Giorgio likes to say we are now Homo sapiens sapiens sapiens.  It now appears that tailbone is connected to the tadpole.

If the ancient alien theory side should be believed, as Robert Clotworthy might say about a croc of another color, it’s no wonder those aliens stay underground and underwater.

It now appears that when St. George wanted to slay that Dragon in Scotland during the Mediaeval period, he was actually trying to keep a reptile from getting into his wife’s chastity belt .

The series lost a golden opportunity to use clips from the old chestnut movie, Creature from the Black Lagoon, to truly make us uncomfortable with the scales of human justice.

Unidentified, Improving Episode 3

DATELINE: Old Hat Re-lined?

AATIP

Having the tenacity to stick with the weaker opening episodes, we found the series hit its stride in the third showing. Of course, yet another member of the “team” is introduced, a former Chief Petty Officer named Cahill.

We continue to question how and why Luis Elizondo was ever put in charge of a top-secret project at the Pentagon. It is a bigger mystery than the presence of forces more powerful than any country on Earth.

What’s more, we discover that the Trump evangelical generals in the Pentagon regard any investigation of UFOs as placating the demonic. Yes, they oppose any investigation on religious grounds. These people kept any reports from reaching General James Mattis who was Trump’s most respected Secretary until he wasn’t.

These guys are not exactly Annapolis types, and only Chris Mellon comes across as a true patrician and of a high rank in government.

This week they follow the UFOs to an isle about 150 miles off the coast of Mexico where they allegedly dived into the ocean. Talking to fishermen (with a translator) is interesting because universal whoosing noises and hand gestures speak volumes about describing the unknown, unidentified tic tac craft.

What is a bit of a shocker:  Americans are not allowed on the island of Guadalupe because of its environmental protections!  Hunh? Well, apparently, this location is one of the hotspots for great white sharks: more here than anywhere in the world. This surprises us as we thought the Australian Great Barrier Reef was their favorite spot.

A wildlife expert notes that the sharks come here because of magnetic anomalies near the island—perhaps caused by the submersed UFOs.

The show focuses on the Nimitz sightings from 2004, and its infamous video released by the Pentagon for reasons unfathomable.