Trans-dimensional and Spiritual Worlds

DATELINE: Psychics as Remote Viewers

tracking orbs the new wayPara-People (new terms for Ghosts?)

Tracking orbs and their passengers (Pp) aka para-people?

Not one week after holding a séance to try to connect with spiritual beings in another dimension, we were shocked that Ancient Aliens TV series released a new episode that detailed the notion that light energy is “Trans-Dimensional”.

In fact, they tied together the notion that extra-terrestrials and space craft was a misnomer for trans-dimensional craft and beings. The séance we held to talk to orbs that appear in my home was, rather, according to CIA experiments, a form of “remote viewing.”

They identify psychics as “remote viewers” who are able to see into orb craft and noted that the Pp (a designation for Para-Person was an angelic creature). This roughly corresponded with the message from a spirit that informed me that orbs were transportation devices.

The headquarters of a private group called ECTI tried to discern orbs in nightsky as a travel group, also designated as a dimensional highway through which beings from another parallel universe, or multiverse, were reaching Earth.

They had transcended time, offered communication to receptive humans—and were actually beings who may or may not be ghosts (or what we call ghosts). It was an interesting combination of religious and paranormal experts paired with astrobiologists and UFOlogists.

The notion that throughout the Bible and other religious documents that there are “seven levels” of heaven indicated that these were dimensions in which angels and spirits (by human designation) were Pp, visitors from another realm, according to remote viewers (psychics hired by government investigators).

Citations were made to Einstein and quantum physics as proof that other realms exist and have been identified as spiritual by religious leaders for centuries and time infinitum.

Another peculiar discussion centered on DMT, a minor chemical in the body, often replicated as a psychedelic drug, that floods the pineal gland upon death, making people have post-life dreams, or feeling that they have been abducted by aliens who are “angelic beings” by another nomenclature.

It would seem that vocabulary and concepts have been in consort between science and metaphysics, but that these are not apples and oranges, but fruit of an trans-terrestrial existence.

It was an eye-opening and intriguing examination of visitors from another “world” crossing a barrier through a vortex to offer us guidance, miracles of information, and protection for our own souls that may be sent into another dimension when we pass through a mysterious energy barrier we call death.

 

One Hour on the Decks of Titanic!

DATELINE: Seance on a Saturday PM

carol and orb Kadrolsha with orb (Richard?) next to bookrack!

When your home is haunted by one of the victims of the Titanic, and you are on a first-name basis with that spirit, you may find yourself engaged in strange activities.

So, we came to have a séance on a Saturday afternoon that would try to reach Richard White, a 21-year old college student who died on April 15, 1912. He has been following me for some time, and he was likely responsible for my discovery of his old family estate not far from his grave.

On an August day, we finally arranged the first séance to reach him. Like Arthur Conan Doyle or W.T. Stead, notable 19th century spiritualists, we were about to embark on a great adventure.

To help with this was foremost spiritualist and healer, Kadrolsha Ona Carole, who is known professionally as the Queen of the Paranormal.

Also to join us in my study were long-time ghost hunters Susan Allen, Karen Raymond, and Eric Metzler. They have visited my home often and helped me communicate with the spirits around me. Primarily, this is Richard, a student with a penchant for spending time with a retired professor: Dr. William Russo.

The Queen of Paranormal told us we would conduct a professional investigation, not the usual hand-holding, table-tipping that often occurs in Hollywood movies.

As a first timer, I had a bit of nerves: we set up an antique round table for five, each with a white candle on a red tablecloth. There would be sage to cleanse the air and block out the entrances. There would be bread, home-made, natural.

Our contact, Kadrolsha is fairly active in media—with graphic novels, TV and movie tie-ins. She is a stunning blond woman, tall and with a healer’s kindness. She did not engage in fancy chants to set us up: but did a silent prayer and touched each of us on the head to open up.

Many times I had told Richard through divining rods that I did not want to see him on Titanic and felt he was cheated by life. So, I felt some protection. Only later did we find an orb in a corner photo of our session. My belief is that Richard stood next to a bookrack where my work Chess-Mate from Titanic detailed his life.

What happened shocked me, and it was unexpected: we felt the rock of ship in distress. Many of us were freezing cold and shaking to and fro. I was actually warm, and grew flush, but Eric was profusely sweating and overheated: it was a description that survivors gave of Richard’s father who seemed to suffer a heart attack on deck.

As for me, I felt my hands and arms involuntarily raising off my lap—as if buoyant by water. Yet, I was never cold, but in a stunned state at the reactions of the others at our little circular table.

Our hostess, Kadrolsha also felt choked with heart pains—but Sue was most affected, having visions of a woman forced to separate from her husband who was not allowed on the lifeboat.

Her panic grew exponentially and consoling her was nearly impossible. Kadrolsha recognized this, and she brought us back after a harrowing hour aboard a sinking luxury liner.

This experience lasted an hour, though it felt much quicker and sudden. Once the spell was broken, we felt a great relief: recordings taken will document the time aboard the ship at our table.

Should we try this again? I am wary: for a day after I suffered paranormal hangover, tired and headachey. No bad spirits took up residence in my home, thanks to Richard. Yet, I never again want to be on a Titanic deck, even in a hypnotic trance of a séance.

Dr. William Russo has written three books on his Titanic connections:  Tales of a Titanic Family, Chess-mate from Titanic, and Titanic Mysteries on Mill Circle. All are available on Amazon.com in print and in ebook format.

 

 

 

King Tut’s Fireball

DATELINE:  Dots Around History?

fireball

If you want to connect the dots of Schumacher-Levy comets hitting Jupiter, the first atomic bomb in New Mexico, King Tut’s jewels, the Great Siberian Explosion of 1908, and turning southwest at the pyramids, you ought to tune in to this documentary: The Fireball of King Tutenkhamun.           

 Three experts—one from Egypt, one from the United States, and one from Vienna—travel to the remotest part of Egypt looking for a debris field where the lime glass objects litter a thousand miles.

It seems the scarab on King Tut’s tomb was carved, not from a jewel, but from some strange extraterrestrial rock.

And, the area is strewn with these objects all over the ground for easy pickings.

The area was underwater until a few thousand years ago, which is hard to believe when you look at the vast and beautiful sand dunes without any life. These rocks may have been spread about from water flow!

The scientists also believe these gorgeous glass items came from a meteor, which is not good news. There is no crater, meaning the explosion of a meteor over Egypt hundreds of thousands of years ago was a devastating mid-air blow up.

These rubble piles can exterminate anything near them. If they are big enough, we don’t stand a chance. Could these scientists be wrong?

Well, the American walks around the desert barefoot, which loses credibility here. If you ever walked hot sand on a beach, you know the bad idea it is. It’s like not coming in out of the rain.

Yet, the documentary is compelling and fascinating, despite the foibles of the scientists. Watch the skies.   

   

Digging Deeper into Ben Franklin’s Past

DATELINE: Electrifying Discovery

Franklin Re-enactor Not $50, Counterfeit Ben!

The first episode of the first season of Secrets of the Dead did not disappoint. Called “Ben Franklin’s Bones,” this historical documentary examined a horror story that seemed to emerge in the 1990s when excavators started to dig in the cellar of a Westminster house where Ben Franklin lived in for fifteen years.

Located in London, where he was an ambassador to Parliament for the colonies around 1760, Franklin rented rooms from a “second family” as he called them.

Police and detectives were called to the cellar where workers discovered a treasure trove (if that’s a bonanza) of many human bones. They needed a medical examiner to tell them how old these were, and if they died mysteriously.

Of course, the bones dated from the time that Franklin lived in the house. The noted Renaissance American was active in all kinds of research, membership in the Royal Society as part of his life of scholarship in London. However, no one thought he could be a serial killer. Call in the forensic experts.

And he wasn’t. The bones belonged to people (men, women, and children, birds and turtles) that were already dead. The bones were finely sawed—including the tops of skulls.

It seemed a bit creepy that Franklin could have anything to do with this: yet, the daughter of the household had married a doctor named Hewson who was a noted surgeon. He had presented papers on his research using mercury and turtles—both of which were in the cellar hole. The house, once renovated, became a museum to Franklin’s years in London.

Franklin was a close friend of the doctor and had sponsored his entry into the Royal Society. It would seem that even Ben Franklin had been connected to “Resurrection Men,” the notorious body snatchers of the era of Enlightenment. They provided cadavers stolen from cemeteries to medical men.

It wasn’t a crime to steal a body, only its clothes or jewelry.

The tease of indicting Franklin made for an alarming, if not suspenseful, study of life on Craven Street where the great man resided. All in all, this was a delightful look at a little-known facet of Ben’s amazing life.

 

 

Alien Infection: Pan-Spermia on Comets

DATELINE: Sick of Influenza?

Hoover teaching moment

Hoover teaches Giorgio a Lesson in Life Matter.

When we heard British author Michael Collins state that, “Viruses come from spice,” we were confounded until we realized that his accent actually meant “Viruses come from space.”

So, Ancient Aliens has reached the epidemiological conclusion that it is all astrobiology after all.

NASA scientist Dr. Richard Hoover takes Giorgio into a glacier to look for ice worms among the ancient DNA hiding in ice crystals. These likely arrived thousands, if not millions of years ago. They are waiting to infect us.

According to ancient alien theorists, these directed viruses are intended to alter us:  it’s the old Mathusian philosophy that what doesn’t kill us makes us stronger. It seems space aliens may be weeding out the weaker, culling the herd. We are becoming more like them: androgynous, smarter, and with more brittle bones. Sounds like pan-sexuality, not pan-spermia. It all could be the same thing.

Why? Well, the bad news is that we are being made more compatible to some reptilian space race in order to blend us together at some point in the future of the planet. Your forked tongue may be genetic.

When they point out that in 1918 on the same August day in Boston and Bombay, the Spanish influenza struck and proceeded to kill millions, this was likely the result of the virus riding into the world on the tail of a comet that swiped across two hemispheres.

Through the microbes of the universe the war on DNA was waged.

In case you were wondering, it appears that every living creature in the universe uses DNA to build his living blockheads of seeded beings. So, next time you see a reptilian, remember that he is a cousin under the scaly skin.

 

 

 

Fugitive 25 Years Later

DATELINE:  TV Classic Into Movie Classic

Taken in

A recent homage to the Harrison Ford/Tommy Lee Jones thriller, The Fugitive, never mentioned that it was based on the David Janssen, Quinn/Martin tv series.

Janssen died before age 50 in 1990, shortly before this big-screen version.

If this high-flying, high octaine movie had been a tv show, it would likely have been a two-parter on the small screen.

The film has big written all over it. Big effects and big budget.

We were most amused to see limping Harrison Ford as Dr. Richard Kimble jumping around like a superhero with super-strength, instead of a cardiologist in middle age. His jump off a dam would kill most, or break every bone. Not for Harrison Ford, he just limps away (actually having torn ligaments).

It seems there wasn’t a water hazard the producers and director Andrew Davis couldn’t let pass. Throw Ford into it. And, then, they looked for every staircase in Chicago and make Tommy Lee Jones run up and down.

Apart from that unusual quality, the film also features only three run-ins between the stars: Jones is a US Marshall (again and again in movies) who is relentless in chasing Ford. Their first encounter is 40 minutes into the movie in which Gerard (Jones) admits he does not care whether Dr. Kimble (Ford) is innocent.

These are two arrogant, type A personalities who will let nothing stop them, and therein is a hilarious adventure thriller. Billed nowadays as a thinking man’s version of Deathwish or Taken or even any Bruce Willis adventure, this lives up to its excitement.

Why Dr. Kimble returns to familiar haunts, like his hospital, to find the one-armed killer is beyond sanity. Filmed in Chicago and its St. Patrick’s Day Parade, it is atmospheric of the Windy City.

Everyone admits Dr. Kimble is smarter than the police, but not smarter than Tommy Lee’s laconic character with his snippy attitude.

Twenty-five years have not dampened this movie. It holds up on every level. It is worth your attention, with Big Pharma still the villain.

Unidentified Episode 5, Going Nuclear!

DATELINE: Guadalupe & Minot

Elizondo Pentagon’s Man of La Mancha?

If you want to descend into a typical UFO show, you simply re-hash the stuff that has been examined by a dozen other shows, and you re-interview the now aging witnesses.

So it goes on Unidentified, for their fifth episode. It looks at the British Roswell, so misnamed because there was no crash and no alien bodies recovered.However, you had a Christmas time incident near an American base in England. Here over the course of several nights, strange lights were seen in the woods next to the base. Of course, the military base had one of the biggest stores of nuclear arms in 1980.

To interview the officer in charge, Col. Holt, and one of his security non-coms, Luis Elizondo covers the same old ground, but tells these men they don’t have to answer if there is some military secret involved. Talk about hamstrings.

We figure by the fifth episode we should spell the guy’s name correctly:  Luis Elizondo. He visits Guadalupe this time to find the homing device of both sharks and UFOs. Brilliant researcher Mauricio Hoyos shows up here to note that the sharks are only one element of the mysterious ocean off Mexico.

The most interesting aspect of the interview is that one military policeman suffered injuries as a result of the incident—and even disappeared for an unknown amount of time, scooped up the extra-terrestrials is the theory.

Of course, years later he tried to win some kind of medical disability—and the military claimed he was not in the service at the time, and his records were lost. Yikes. Sen. John McCain’s top aide went to bat for this unfortunate man and helped him win his medical coverage.

She said she never saw such opposition to recognizing what he sacrificed. It was part of a massive coverup of strange ships around nuclear facilities. It can be traced back to the mid-1940s and the Manhattan Project, years before Roswell.

They also spend time detailing the mystery around the Minot base near the Canadian border where nuclear weapons were armed and disarmed by unknown forces.

Once again, we hear that the government has lied to the public (a crime) and that we are at the mercy of forces that do not subjugate us for unknown reasons.

 

This stuff can be called alarming news. These guys are all wearing placards and sandwich boards that read: “The End is Near.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Free Agency Strikes America!

DATELINE:  No Free Lunch Anywhere?

581955345.442218

This week we heard a comment that we stopped writing about sports because of “free agency.”  Well, no, not exactly, though it is an appalling condition in society in general.

You have to understand that lack of loyalty and love of money is rampant across America, not just in basketball where Avery Bradley has signed up to re-join Rajon Rondo, and Kyrie Irving left the place he swore he would stay in front of a million fans.

We have seen “free agency” at work everywhere. If there had been DNA tests thirty years ago, we would have exercised free agency and gone to Harvard University to work as a professor: we have learned we are a descendant of Miles Standish and Massasoit (for whom Massachusetts was named). If we knew we had more Native American in us than Elizabeth Warren, we might even be running for President today.

We have seen free agency in the legal profession. The same lawyers who work for Donald Trump also work for Jeffrey Epstein. You go from billionaire to billionaire. Is it more money? Better opportunity? More challenges? It is not loyalty to a brand.

You might switch banks for better interest rates, or switch social media to be with different influencers.

In recent years we have experienced our primary care doctor whom we loved, move to the Sun Belt, where she said in her letter of departure to patients, there were “more opportunities.” To what? Cure cancer? Lower blood pressure? Deal with fewer insurance forms?

This year our dentist, who had a beautiful office and seemed happy, left for “more opportunities.”  That likely means “more cavities to fill,” or “fewer teeth to pull,” or just where weather allows for fewer snow days.

Free agency is everywhere in society today, and it simply means people can go where they want, for whatever dumb reason strikes their limited fancy. We have an endemic pandemic epidemic of movers and shakers in sports, law, medicine, education, and politics.

Heaven help our society. We need a new prayer, and it must be time to move on from the Lord’s Prayer. Hell, no, I won’t go.

Endeavour Wraps Up Season 6

DATELINE:  Shootout for Morse!

Dr. Max in the library Dr. Max in the Library!

We never expected our intellectual detective show would go big time corruption at the highest levels of government. And, we have to admit surprise when the show’s climax turns out to be Gunfight at the OK Corral.

The old gang re-gathers in high form. And, corrupt politicians may escape, but never dirty cops.

Some shocks do occur along the way: Dr. Max DeBryn (James Bradshaw) hardly seems the sort to be a mob target, but threats to nearly every member of the cast leads us to worry some may not be returning for season 7.  Yes, there will be another year, 1970.

In the meantime, we almost thought we were watching Ancient Aliens or Curse of Oak Island when the foremost villains turn out to be Freemasons.

We can almost be assured that next summer there will be a few more of these precious and rare gems. Endeavour has behaved badly to end this season, which may be a cliff-hanger for this series, but we already know the middle-aged and older Inspector Morse survives to make the prequel post-quel episodes with the late John Thaw as Endeavour.

Nevertheless, you should not say “nevermore,” to this Shaun Evans outrage. Abigail Thaw (John’s daughter) remains a staple news reporter here to bring the two series into some kind of karma.

Some of the highlights of the finale include Inspector Thursday noting to an Oxford don that he was partial to Holly Martins (good grief, shades of The Third Man). We did enjoy seeing Dr. Max DeBryn in the library with the ice pick.

Well, we love this show for a good reason. You will have to wait for a year to see the good works rewarded fully with crime busting for four more episodes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catalina ‘Unidentified’ Hotspot, E2

DATELINE: History Channel’s Latest UFO Series

AATIP Another Dumb Acronym?

We came back for the summer doldrums of TV lunacy. It used to be all about Unidentified Objects, but now the actual TV series is Unidentified.

Luis Elizando and Chris Mellon are indeed high-level former government insiders, but where does Tom deLonge fit into this mix. Maybe rock stars are the last hidden agents of the CIA.

In any respect, the gang seems to take on the notorious 2004 Nimitz incident, only now famous since the Pentagon in its wisdom, released some Tic Tac eye candy to the public.

Yes, we are now to accept without question the Pentagon deciding we can see mysterious video, and the man in charge quits over what is happening. You mean he wanted to keep it all secret?

If you are having trouble sorting this stuff out, a trip to Catalina Island is breathtaking, but won’t make you feel any better. It is 50 miles from Los Angeles and a bunch of important military-space bases.

One witness tells that the government simply confiscated radar data and refused to allow reports to be written about multiple incidents or events where it was “raining” UFOs off Catalina.

For years there has been speculation that there is a base there (someone, we don’t know whom). Our experts are alarmed, like Paul Revere, telling us they are coming by sea.

We don’t know if the space men were red coats or are invisible at 30,000 miles per hour.

We are still asking ourselves who put Luis Elizando in charge of a top-secret Pentagon program called AATIP (probably the same idiots who coined the acronym for the latest UFO sightings).

Sweet Tooth for Murder on Endeavour

DATELINE: PBS Masterpiece Mystery

evans Shaun Endeavours

With only a handful of episodes this season, Endeavour is making the most of its short-sighted insights. This year it returns to its four episode arc of murderous delight.

There is a great focus on the personal lives of the characters for this showing: Bright (Anton Lesser) has a marriage falling apart because his wife is sick; Thursday (Roger Allam) has a wife sick of him. And, as for Morse (Shaun Evans), he continues to look for love in all the wrong places. For a great detective, he seems to miss the obvious.

James Bradshaw’s coroner is busier than ever—and has more personal connections to Endeavour and Bright, with an easy integration of personal and professional conversations.

Morse is looking for a rental detached home in a charming Oxford village that is rife with murder, hate letters, and the big business—a candy factory with rich and powerful victims.

The episode also starts off with a fox hunt that seems almost a throwback to the 1960s British movie, Tom Jones. There’s the rub.

Red herrings are always thrown about, but the show remains clever beyond everything else that is contemporary TV detective series. American shows are childish, and this one is cerebral.

We see dark times ahead for Endeavour as the season wraps: even his trusted Thursday mentor is not to be trusted. Jim Strange (Sean Rigby), another long-time colleague/friend, warns him off.

This magnificent series will be off too for a year with all too few brilliant cases.

 

Mystery Files Presents 13 Cases

DATELINE:  Fake Controversies

mystery files

Well, prepare yourself for undercooked conspiracy theories and the usual suspects. It’s called without much originality, Mystery Files.

Amazon Prime gives us a British series from 2010 with thirteen traditional topics and claims they will solve the mystery behind the story.

We are inclined to give 30 minutes to a documentary series about the usual suspects. We also decided to sample the half-dozen topics for which we have an interest and have done some study. A few of them are actually people on whom we have written a book or two.

Mystery Files looks at Jack the Ripper, Leonardo da Vinci, Billy the Kid, Rasputin, Abe Lincoln, and the Romanovs, and the Man in the iron mask not necessarily in that order. We picked the names randomly to see what problem they intended to solve. We suspected that we would have the pedestrian, traditional mystery, but the series went out of its way to try to debunk something not often considered. The others we did not sample included Cleopatra, King Arthur, Nostradamus, and Joan of Arc.

Though the Leonardo show claimed it would look at his works like Mona Lisa, it actually tried to illustrate that Leonardo’s scientific reputation is largely based on plagiarized ideas from other seers of future technology.

They were going to identify the real Jack the Ripper, hinting that it was not one of the usual candidates, and they wanted to point out that Billy the Kid was not the violent serial killer dime novels claimed. (Yeah, he murdered only 4 people.) And, Rasputin may have been murdered, not by Russian nobles worried about the Czar, but by British secret service agents.

A double episode also looked at what happened to Anastasia and her sisters.

The findings all had a distinct British connection: even the Billy the Kid episode focused on his English friend John Tunstall and that the Kid was hell-bent on vindicating his murdered benefactor (avoiding the sticky issue of their consenting adulthood).

Prince Yousoupoof had an Oxford friend who worked for British intelligence and used the Czar’s relation as an excuse to stop Rasputin from convincing the Czar from brokering peace with Germany (to the detriment of England).

And, they wanted to prove that Abe Lincoln used mercury-laced pills to control his chronic depression and was poisoning himself. As for the Voltaire story, there seemed to be a prisoner in a velvet mask, not an iron one, in their assessment.

For the most part, their plans are grandiose, and not fully proven in half-an-hour, or worse they back down from the outrageous claims in nearly every case.

Yet, we give them credit for cram packing the episodes and trying to give us a different perspective.

Moon Landing for Endeavour

DATELINE: Aging Badly.

aging badly Allam & Evans.

Sixth season, episode 2, takes place at the time of the Apollo Moon landing. So, it is only natural that the murder victim at Oxford is an astrophysicist. Endeavour is more earthbound than the astronauts in July, 1969.

Morse is an exhibits officer who routinely oversteps his bounds. His new superior sees him as a condescending twit, and he may be right. Morse’s friend, Jim Strange, notes that the brilliant detective has not lost his heavy-handed social skills.

This episode is directed by star Shaun Evans.

Thursday (Allam) keeps reminding him that they are part of a bureaucratic system that follows chain-of-command, but Endeavour is the rebel within the system.

While astronauts make giant leaps for mankind on the Moon, back on Earth there are small steps toward crime solving by hard-working detectives.

Perhaps what’s most interesting about the historical inaccuracy of the series is that the days when cops were despised by youth movement types, you have them with more virtue and dedication than Joe Friday ever showed.

As a mystery show, Endeavour always puts together disparate elements into a stew that may be overly complicated. Punch and Judy has now reached marionette TV space shows of 1969, where jealousy and spousal swapping are the hot topics of the day—and motive for murders.

The regulars (Roger Allam, Anton Lesser) and others recognize now how good they had it in the previous five seasons. Now, they are reduced to working under lesser talents while bigger events overwhelm the world.

Though this series is not as elegant or finely tuned as an Agatha Christie story, you may find it convoluted on the side of intellectualism. That’s a rare problem in this age of unusual idiocy in TV shows, detective programs, and characters in general.

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s B Sirius! Ancient Aliens Tries!

DATELINE: Another Gemstone from Outer Space

B serious Starry Starry Night!

Doggone it. You guessed it. Ancient Aliens gave us an etymology lesson in word derivation. They brought us through a half-dozen variations on the word “dragon” and then showed its connections to various African tribes that have artifacts that extend back 17,000 years.

Even Japanese royalty has a dragon connection.

The point is that some amphibious creature, half-human and half-aquatic was the traveler from another star system. Linda Moulton Howe throws out that these creatures were here farming for genetic materials:  good grief, does that mean what we think it means?

Sirius is the dog star, and dog is a word that has no historical precedent. The sound of dogon, or drogon, is present as the name of a race of supernatural beings in primitive tribes.

Though you may want to say they all used the word because some creature called himself something that sounded like it, that is not definitive and cannot be called absolute.

Going back 17,000 years ago, the number of voice-related sounds of a group of humans may have traveled to dozens of locations, a cultural memory that is only vaguely related to star systems. However, two African geographic areas seem to have started the trend that went right up to Gaelic or Irish cultural fairy-like creatures.

Ancient Aliens throws in the constant image of reptilians without going into the theory of an entire race of underground space creatures that have intrigued them in past seasons.

Nope, you didn’t hear that connection this go-round. Doggone it. See you later, Alligator People.

We must admit and give credit that there is something decidedly strange that a tribe knew about Sirius B, a small and undiscovered companion star to the larger and brighter Sirius A. The detail known thousands of years ago is stunning and a precursor to what modern science only recently learned.

We have to give Ancient Aliens credit again for raising some truly weird coincidences. They may have created big news that man bites dog, outer space style.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Conspire to Kill Ortiz!

DATELINE: Bounty Hunters Come Cheap in DR

ortiz-unleashed Bargain Basement Killers!

The price on David Ortiz’s head was reportedly only $6000 to be divided up by a dozen conspirator killers. Then, the number went up: no, not the bounty, but the number of plotters splitting the ante. The latest count from the Dominican Republic is there are ten co-conspirators. It’s almost like a county fair of killers. A few are still at large.

We are on our way to a baker’s dozen.

Maybe your money goes a lot farther in the Dominican Republic economy. If that cheap lifestyle is driving Americans to move to that crime-ridden country, they are living a cheapskate rich lifestyle.

We thought that assassination of Julius Caesar was a shoddy affair, but 2000 years later the attack on Ortiz is even more carnival-like. Instead of a forum, or even Fenway Park, Ortiz was shot in the back, a la Jesse James, in an outdoor bistro atmosphere.

No motive has been given for the crime. We cringe at the speculation. And none of it enhances Ortiz’s reputation as a moral paragon.

Friends now say that Ortiz counted on the general public to protect him from dangerous gang members or gangsters.

The best laid plans belong to mice, not men. No one could stop the bullet with Big Papi’s name on it.

If you think witness identification is a deterrent to crime, you have only to see killers blithely walk up to the large Ortiz and put the gun at gall bladder height. They did not care who saw them, or if they would be known.

What we have here is the polar opposite of the Aaron Hernandez case.

The motorcycle get-away driver was inept too. He skidded into the crowd, giving a mob the courage to beat him up. He professes to be a Big Papi fan.

Heavens, imagine what might have happened if the motorcycle driver had been a Yankee fan.

We come back to the low-ball price on Ortiz’s head. This was not the work of a head-hunter, but of a world where life is not only cheap, but it is on sale to anyone with a credit card limit under $8000. The killers planned to share the amount at a payoff of $1000 each, but as the number goes up, the slice of the pie drops to crumbs for a murder.