Hunt for Elusive Unitah Skinwalker

DATELINE: Pre-TV Series

 Knapp Time.

 Two years previous to the History Channel series, the “paranormal investigator” named Jeremy Corbell took on the subject with his viewpoint. He rounded up George Knapp who had done 20 years of research—including work with Robert Bigelow before he sold the ranch and its rights to the new TV series owner.

The film is called Hunt for the Skinwalker.

Skinwalker Ranch is a paranormal Disneyland, according to this movie.

Corbell intones like he is Rod Serling stealing Twilight Zone phrases in his narrative. He found his matchmate in George Knapp, aging and renewed UFO hunter for decades. Knapp has boxes of old videotaped interviews and paper documents. Korbell won fame by bringing Bob Lazar out of hiding a few years ago to give an updated opinion on Area 51.

This is George Knapp’s seminall life work, apparently never digitized nor copied for posterity. Videos were never made into DVD and audio tape look like you couldn’t find the proper equipment to play them. No one has looked at this material in years. Now, the Hunt for the Skinwalker will make an attempt. It’s clearly enough to spark History Channel’s interest in doing a series two years later.

Korbell likens the area to “Area 52” and largely lets dramatic Knapp do narration duty. He knows how to make mystery more bizarre, for sure.

Knapp related the story of how he tried to do everything to provoke the poltergeist, UFOs, ghosts, orbs, or other phenomena, to no avail, even doing some forbidden digging. He was attacked only by mosquitos. He also knew Robert Bigelow and reveals that the strange billionaire did not want the associated horrors beyond UFOs. He indicated that Bigelow was warned off the property—and sold it to Brandon Fuglar.

Fulgar shows up in this film, refusing to identify himself because it would hurt his business “empire,” which is Fuglar to a T. However, something changed his mind between making this Corbell movie and the History series.

Here the cattle mutilations and other worldly voices are given far more attention.

Neither Corbell, nor Knapp, has any participation in the TV series. And, the movie is far better than the Fuglar produced show.

 

 

Beast of Whitehall: Local Legend

DATELINE: Bigfoot Next to Champ

Brian Gosselin of Whitehall.

You might think it is some dark Viking who attacked Alfred the Great, but no, this beast is another Bigfoot wannabe who seems to reside in upstate New York, not far from Vermont. Whitehall is the “Home of the U.S. Navy,” so damn those torpedoes.

Yes, Whitehall is a sleepy New England town with charm galore, but it borders on paranormal, if not abnormal, creatures: Champ is the Loch Ness Monster of nearby Lake Champlain, and the Beast of Whitehall, (the Abair Road Incident)  has been skulking around the Adirondack Mountains since settlers first arrived. Now the local Chamber of Commerce seems to be cashing in.

We don’t know if Hawkeye and Uncas ran into them during the Last of the Mohicans, but if they looked, Bigfoot was behind one of the trees.

This short, interesting local documentary was put together, based on a key 1976 sighting in which 11 police officers, local and state, responded when three local teens ran into a seven-foot monster with red eyes.

Officer Brian Gosselin’s younger brother is no longer among us, and this film is a testimony to his encounter. Brian remains haunted by the meeting and suffered years of ridicule as a police officer. His logs have mysteriously disappeared, despite his painstaking recollections.

First sightings occurred when people showed up in the area in the mid-1700s. The national protected area is bigger than most other national parks, including Yellowstone. It also has the distinction of being a protected area—that is, they ban any hunting of Bigfoot. He is a permanent resident, but hasn’t cast any ballots we know of.

Most academics disparage the idea of a large primate living secretly in Whitehall, even today. Alas, too, many of the key witnesses from the 1970s have amazingly already passed away: Dan Gordon gave an extraordinary interview to Monsterquest and died in 2016, while Paul Gosselin died in 2015. It is hard to believe how fast time passes. Even Bigfoot’s grandchildren must now be secretly roaming the woods outside of Whitehall.

 

 

Skinny Dip at Skinwalker Ranch

DATELINE: Yes, We Have No Mutilations

 AlienCon Guests!

There seems to be some paranoia striking deep into Skinwalker Ranch, which is saying something. Already on alert about all things paranormal, an ersatz Area 51 and a Half, the crew does not need much to be at each other’s throats.

This week several interesting developments made us skeptical. First, while they were trying to determine if EVPs were occurring at one of the staff houses, they see a helicopter flying overhead. It has a camera on its bottomside and no insignias.

It is clearly not Brandon Fugal, their boss who has a fancy copter and arrives like deus ex machina. This unknown aircraft sets them into a frenzy. We thought it would not be beyond producers to hire a fly-by to add intrigue.

This matter is put on the back burner when we are cast into the opening show’s first sequence:  discovery of a dead cow on the property. Everyone scrambles, but the creature, dead for a few hours, is not mutilated, by dead mysteriously.

When they call their billionaire owner, he is so upset that he states he will drive over immediately with an expert in the subject of cattle mutilation. Suddenly he is not flying in his private copter from Vegas.

When he arrives with his “expert”, it is none other than Linda Moulton Howe, making her appearance his best decision in the series.

Surprisingly, her costar on Ancient Aliens, Travis Taylor, is not there to greet her.

She visits the dead cow and checks out footage and states the obvious: it’s not cattle mutilation, but the electro-magnetic aspect interests her.

Though the alpacas are in a protective cage, Linda points out that something could enter from above, which comes as a shock to several. Hunh? You mean they never considered the UFOs?

Oh, well, this was a better entry than the previous six.

 

Picking at Bones on Lost Gold

DATELINE: Billons 

  John Casey

 

At long last, half-way through the second season, the show returned to the promise it evinced last season.

Here, some real discoveries intrigue the viewer. We still think there are unfilmed events behind the scenes. When Bingo Minerva meets up with Dr. Chuck McDougall, he is too open and too ready to share his long-prized treasure maps from the Ferdinand Marcos archives. He was likely paid generously for this.

McDougall was dismissed as a “treasure hunter” with Robert Curtis in the 1980s, but he was a respected scholar with high level connections in the Philippines. However, President Corazon Aquino pulled his right to search after a short time. He warns Bingo that there are dangers—people will kill and steal the treasure. Well, a couple of billion dollars of bullion will do that.

Back in the Luzon area, some idiocy continues: like trying to move a heavy excavator across three miles of muddy road. Impossible.

The most interesting of all was finding teeth and bones in the pivotal tunnel. John Casey shuts down the operation immediately, and the miners were clearly uneasy at finding the remains. Whose graves might these be? Casey theorized Japanese left prisoners buried alive in these tunnels.

Bingo is authorized to make a deal with Dr. McDougall for his authenticated maps. He wants 1% of the treasure for his info. We cannot calculate how many millions that will be.

As a side-note, John Casey goes on a tirade in one scene and explains that no one and nothing will stop him in his quest to find this treasure. AT least now we know what happened to last year’s team. There is no comfort for his partners this season.

 

 

To Believe or To Investigate?

DATELINE: I Want to Believe! 

 Nicks Redfern & Pope

The documentary with the worst title so far this year is I Want to Believe! 

What a pity because it actually might attract more viewers with a better title. Of course, the opening credits undermine it further when the production company is misspelled as “Prodruction.”  Sloppy filmmakers.

Once the film starts, you realize that it is giving us some of the better Ancient Aliensexperts in a different light. Yes, there are our personal favorites Nick Pope, Nick Redburn, and Mike Bara. They are the true stars of this picture—and they dominate the interviews, though a few other lesser knowns offer opinions.

These three usually offer sound-bite one-sentence comments on a specific topic on Ancient Aliens.Here they are allowed to open up—and even explain a bit of their personal history and why they went into this crypto-journalism field of UFOs.

Make no mistake, they do think of themselves not as believers, but as investigators with an open mind.

The term UFO is widely disparaged as it is meaningless since anything unknown in the sky is a UFO. They also tend to respect “professional” witnesses over “abductees” because expertise carries some weight in their investigations. Bara disputes this and thinks the Travis Walton case is highly compelling because six witnesses passed multiple lie detector tests.

As theorists, they tend to lump all paranormal into one or two categories: either governmental disinformation for political motives, or the more interesting—interdimensional beings. Here, whatever culture you find, whether ghosts, orbs, little gray men, a Bigfoot. It is from a time-travel source in our past or parallel universe.

They do not dismiss the idea that an ancient civilization, now long gone on Earth, went to the Moon or Mars, and then eons ago came to an end. Their remnants may be our visitors.

We tend to agree that interdimensional explanations work best to include spirits who may have connections to ordinary people today whom they visit in one form or another.

As an adjunct to Ancient Aliens, we thought this was a more comprehensive consideration, with more attention to details than a fly in the ointment.

Lured: I Love Lucy!

DATELINE:   George Sanders Loves Lucy!

Lucille Ball, George Sanders, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Boris Karloff, and Charles Coburn. If you are an old movie fan, these names together in a movie will send you into the stratosphere. It’s a murder mystery set in modern London with an American showgirl recruited by Scotland Yard to catch a serial killer.

Lured  is a 1947 film overlooked by most because it is such a cross against typecast.

Lucy is sarcastically funny when she needs to be. George Sanders actually has a line in which he states, “I’m an unmitigated cad,” and the killer has a penchant for the poetry of Charles Baudelaire.

This is not your usual mystery film. Douglas Sirk directs with his usual great aplomb and knows how to let his highly idiosyncratic actors play their stereotypes to the hilt. He made his name later in big budget soap opera movies, but here he plays film noir like a comic Hitchcock.

Not only that, the film is beautiful to look at—with its glossy black and white sets that do not scrimp on atmosphere.

Coburn is the lead Yard inspector—and his assistants are Alan Napier and Robert Coote!

The litany of rogue suspects is peachy Boris Karloff and Lucy are marvelous as he is the mad fashion designer and she is his model. Later she attends a Schubert concert after joining the staff of butler Alan Mowbray. She must hunt down each suspect with her brash comedy timing. You will soon recognize the Lucy you love.

You may not guess who the culprit is until the final reel—and Lucy does an excellent job working for Scotland Yard.

A lost gem, you owe it to see this charming comedy thriller.

 

 

 

 

 

Skin of Their Teeth Ranch, Drilling Down

 Dr. Travis Taylor

DATELINE: Digging Shallow

Despite all the hoopla about no digging on Skinwalker Ranch,there will be drilling down.

We suspect Travis Taylor would have walked off the show in a huff if they didn’t drill. Of course, we put nothing past the drama queens on these reality series.

Of interest was the visit of a Native American high priest or shaman. He says a prayer over the area where they will do some core samples. Dr. Travis Taylor was quite respectful because he believes that the magical approach may calm some fears and worries. The shaman was the guest of Dragonfly, the hostile security chief.

There was only a little comfort given by the guest who said, if there is trouble, they should not dig.

Sure enough, when the experts come to do core samples and check the radiation levels, there is nothing particularly sinister. However, a strange wind seemed to shake the telephone poles along the road. Taylor suspected earthquake. Tom Winterton took a powder rather than face any anomaly.

Previously Taylor received radiation burns from his work on the ranch, but all that was strangely absent when testers arrive at the same location.

The most disturbing element of the show was the cruel decision to bring two alpacas to the ranch. Exotic and adorable, they are largely silent—and were put into a pen that was not secure.

Sure enough, something attacked them in the pen. On security cameras, they are chased and are screaming. The photos are not clear and there is no way to know what was there. We blame the people who brought these defenseless creatures into the show as guinea pigs.

Guinea pigs are experimental victims. Once again, this is a unsympathetic group.

 

Arbery Murder by Q-uestionable Conspirators

DATELINE: Murder by Q Supporters?

 Makeshift Memorial.

What the media is failing to report is that the two men, father and son, who shot and allegedly murdered Ahmaud Arbery in cold blood are the most virulent kind of Trump supporters.

You may have picked up on that when Trump mentioned the case and called it “sad.” His opponent Joe Biden called it murder, and even the Republican Trump supporter in Georgia, the governor, was taken aback by the brazen racial murder. Trump uses dog whistles to call his Q supporters to line up for the next act.

It is now the equivalent of 19thcentury lynching: self-righteous white men of survivalist mentality are taking the law into vigilante hands. They decide who is a suspect, and they now shoot you on the street for being suspicious.

Is this all tied into the kookoo bird Q group? Could be: those are the more revolutionized conspirators who think Trump has a secret plan to stop liberals by locking up Obama and Hilary Clinton in order to perpetuate his presidency beyond Constitutional limits.

If you can shoot black people in Florida for standing on any ground that you happened to be standing on, then you can ambush a black jogger in Georgia and shoot him with a shotgun when he expresses dismay.

You may also want to note that it took a month to arrest these bozos—and someone had to release video footage that showed their story was a mountain of falsity before the Georgia investigatory people acted.

As for the retired killer, he worked for the District Attorney and felt empowered. She has since recused herself, which is a couple of letters from excusing herself for working with thugs.

Trump intends to keep America great by following in the footsteps of the Third Reich.

 

 

Secret Tapes Spur Lost Gold of World War II

 DATELINE: Look Out Below!

 You Got Bingo.

Having been given secret and allegedly dangerous tapes about the Marcos search for the stolen gold of the Japanese, the series seems impervious to any dangers. Lost Gold of World War II  may have danger lurking everywhere from anti-American haters to Japanese booby traps.

Not only that, we have the usual idiocy by the gold hunters:  they dig at a waterfall tunnel during a monsoon—and are surprised their equipment becomes mud-bound.

The solution to the search will be to do a certain kind of excavation, but John Casey rejects this because the technique will poison the town water supply for the locals. Yes, that would be bad public relations for foreign visitors, digging up the local area on an obsessive quest.

Talk about Ugly Americans: the new team seems a step down from last year’s older, but wiser crew.

Thankfully, there is Bingo Minerva back in the United States, consulting with real academic experts and learning what’s back in Luzon. He reports via Skype that only 20% of the stolen artifacts were recovered and that the treasure could be a compendium of diamonds and other precious stones,, all encased in metal tubes.

As for the so-called experts consulted in the area, they call themselves “historians” but never give degrees, titles, or university associations. These self-anointed experts throw out years of experience as Marines or other para-military soldiers. It is dubious to say the least. Their expert dismisses the idea that a discovered knife is from World War II. He places it from the 1980s. These treasure hunters are so off that we begin to wonder what else they have wrong.

Moreover, the tech team of twin bearded young men, Colin and Max, complain about the weather and terrain, while the father and son miners seem to revel in their condition.

An unusual expert, a woman tractor excavator, named Michelle, is one tough bird, but manages to become stuck in the mud. Only after a day of crisis management, ineptly by Casey’s younger brother, does she manage to wiggle the expensive equipment out of danger. No jokes about women drivers, please, because there is a dearth of women on these “boys’ adventures series.”

The series seems to hang on man-made error as the cliff-hanging routine of the season. Not a good start to a once promising series.

 

 

 

More Walking, Less Skin on Skinwalker Ranch.

DATELINE: Dragonfly in the Ointment!

What’s underneath the Secret of Skinwalker Ranch? If you recall the scene from the original Thing, the explorers in the Arctic form a human ring around something under the ice: it turns out to be oval, like a saucer.

This week with GPR, the radar indicates something is about 20 feet under the ground near a hotspot at the ranch. When Travis Taylor connects the dots, it turns out to be saucer shaped. And two stories tall.

Of course, you have to take Taylor with a grain of salt and a damaged brain cell or two. He is at the abandoned homestead and is told not to pick up a heavy cover to a well. He never listens. Immediately he is hit with the equivalent of 20,000 X-rays. He felt a tad unwell, as you might expect.

One of the security guards leaders nicknamed Dragonfly, who is a pip, states he has no opinion because he lacks a PhD. Well, there you have in a nutshell the anti-intellectual and anti-scientific attitude of viewers, according to History Channel demographics. There is a dragonfly in the ointment.

What have we got here? A series that offends science and lies about truth. Robert Clotworthy’s sonorous tones tell us that the federal government studied the place for 10 years and learned nothing. Earlier we heard that former owner Robert Bigelow had all kinds of information, but refused to release it.

Taylor is clearly furious with the billionaire boss and his dragonfly that he had to defend the idea of drilling to find out what he was hired to study. We may never have seen such flaring anger in Dr. Taylor in any of his previous TV appearances.

Someone is withholding truth. You may want to pursue this series for a few more episodes, but it is now called History’s “new hit” in ads. What that means for the future only space aliens can tell.

 

 

 

Lost Gold of WW2 and Lost Members from Season 1

DATELINE: Legend of the Lost Members?

 

 Satellite image of gold under waterfall?

There is more than lost gold here: just about the entire cast from the first season has disappeared, perhaps kidnapped by aliens, or ordered to walk the plank by survivor John Casey. He’s now in charge.

You may suspect History Channel cleaned house and did their demographic diligence to rid the show of weak links.

Peter Struzzieri, the old man of last season, and braintrust, is gone. There is a reference to “Pete” but no other explanation of what happened to the gang that worked so hard to locate a tunnel—and were just about to enter.

The only member to escape the wrath of John Casey is Bingo Minerva, likely because the head researcher is never in the Philippines. He is still digging up background info for the audience.

Meanwhile, the show describes the second season as a “new team and new technology.”

Well, the template granddaddy, Curse of Oak Island, isclearly at work. Civil War Gold has sunk in Lake Michigan, and replacements in the World II quest now include brothers, John Casey and Rob. It seems the Lagina model at work. There are also father-son miners, and a couple of geophysicists with matching beards, who are too precious to do hard labor.

Yet, this was the best new show of last season. It seems now hard pressed to replace Struzzieri who made contacts with secretive people, but a new oldster must perform that re-connect. He’s told that he is liable to be murdered for the information, but is undaunted.

There are unknown agents of the late dictator Marcos, the CIA, and other mysterious people who want to put their hands on over 200 billion dollars’ worth of stolen loot. Yes, that’s motivation.

A rogue terrorist unit of communists wants to rid the Luzon area of various American interlopers, which does not sound too good for the gold hunters who discover their tunnel is now lost under cave-ins.

There is new technology from Russia, no less, some kind of nuclear magnetic resonance that can find gold deposits underground from a satellite. It shows some glowing locations, which unfortunately are about 300 feet under a waterfall. Well, we know what the problem will be this season.

We are willing to give this a go for the second season because its followup Skinwalker show is a mess to behold.

 

 

 

Oak Island Ends 7th Season with $ Whimper

DATELINE: The Price is not Right.

 Star is born.

When Gary Drayton is doing the History Channel promos for the last episode of the season, you know they have a new star on their hands.

It’s raw November as the season ends, and the digging time is over. The so-called Fellowship’s final dig becomes too dangerous and is curtailed because of collapsing tunnels. It is the worst news of the season.

Attention immediately shifted to the swamp. It was a docking area and a man-made site, and Dr. Ian Spooner brings the most interesting news. He dated tree branches and rushed to give them the dates of his findings.

The swamp was created in 1200 A.D. which seems to be Templar. It is a stunning historical event, though this is secondary to finding gold in most eyes.

Marty Lagina resisted any idea of the swamp being important, but now he has found that answers are there. If the swamp was made in 1200, you have something momentous, far earlier than the Columbus discovering America notion.

Human activity could include tunneling 800 years ago. There is a stronger sense that there were several treasure burials. A second group may have taken advantage of their knowledge about the early excavations.

If there is cold water, Marty Lagina has the right to throw it on this exploration. He now states that additional digging for the Money Pit may now tally into the tens of millions. At what point does the treasure wash out by the cost of retrieving it?

Should they dig down 250 feet and create a concrete circle in which you may find the treasure?  It seems beyond feasible. How much profit can you dig out of this series?

A memorial to honor Dan Blankenship was created immediately, no matter what else happens. Dan’s not able to be there, but his presence will remain.

 

Shatner Goes to Dogs

DATELINE: Amazing Animals on UnXplained  

 Statue of Greyfriars Bobby!

 

“Amazing animals”, indeed, as UnXplained  takes on the mysteries of animal sentience. It is not just cats and dogs that Shatner gives a full nod and wink, but birds and whales too.

In certainly one of the most intriguing episodes of the series, the vignettes under study include one on the famous and heroic horse from the Korean War! Yes, a horse with independent spirit worked near miracles without human assistance. Sergeant Reckless even has a statue to her testimony—and how did she know what to do to bring wounded soldiers to medical assistance. Who knew there was an active military horse as late as the 1950s?

Shatner admits that his own love of horses is proven by the ability of the creatures to bond with its riders. Such animals are often used for therapy with psychically injured vets who need TLC—which the horse can provide.

There is also a rather interesting take on the Disney movie that was, in fact, a true story about Greyfriars Bobby. That’s the dog with such loyalty that for 14 years he slept every night on his master’s grave.

The suggestion here is that these animals saw dead people, or had psi trailing ability. That’s the condition where cats can go over a 1000 miles to locate a family they belong to.

There are also stories about dolphins and whales saving people from predators tiger sharks, as well as warblers that seem to take cues from Nature about meteorology and dangers.

If you think that the animal kingdom is more psychic than you ever suspected, this is your evidentiary show. Fascinating, with the usual Shatner delivery to amuse us.

What? Another Week of Season Seven?

DATELINE: Deadend Kids?

 Ball’s Tunnel?

It’s like lingering on a deathbed. Yet, here we are with another weekly survival on Curse of Oak Island. We are hanging on by a dendro count by our fingernails. Even Alex Lagina is starting to look shopworn, even with his filthy millions and clean hands.

Mother of Mercy, is there no one who will rid us of this meddlesome priest? Oh, wait, that’s another series altogether. If this continues, we think Gary Drayton will begin seeing the ghost of Hamlet’s father on the ramparts.

He does find a crowbar in what seems to be the true Money Pit. Legge thinks it is an anchor or pulley. He always impresses Alex. Gary realizes he needs a bigger metal detector.

Every time Carmen Legge says “1700” we begin to think it is a glitch on the audio. So, he shocks them by saying, “Middle Ages.”

At 120 feet below, there is again more coconut fiber. They also locate a metal shield that was used in 1931—not exactly the original diggers. But it does indicate that they have reached the end of searcher efforts.

Next should be original buried stuff. However, at this point, the crane pressure brace has broken. It’s a setback as the season comes to a finish. It does mean something is there causing the grinder to be blocked. But they are so desperate they are working into thedarkness.

This forces them to turn to excavating the home of a man who was once a slave but ended up super-wealthy. Samuel Ball had something tunneling under his house. Samuel Ball’s lot may have been over a much older vault. Something big may be apparent because Alex shows up and a camera is snaked deep into the tunnel.

  Gorky Park: No Parking

DATELINE: Cold War Murder Mystery.

 Sable Hat Man!

Back in 1983 came the crime thriller about the Moscow Police Department (who had the unfortunate privilege of working under the KGB). It’s a definite low-tech crime CSI story about the cold-blooded Cold War killing of three people in Gorky Park.

Martin Cruz Smith’s novel was a best-seller, but based on this movie, the story is grisly and pathetic. Three bodies are found with their faces and fingers cut off to prevent identification. It seems a bit much for a small-time crime. Top-notch Soviet policeman William Hurt must solve the case.

There are some interesting moments in the film, but it pales next to today’s sharp TV crime dramas. Here in this film, it’s the cast that holds you in place, however miscast William Hurt is.

We were surprised to see great actor Alexander Knox (who played Woodrow Wilson once) in a small role as a Soviet general. But it is Americans like star Lee Marvin who steals every scene he is in: with second billing no less. He plays one of those American billionaires playing footsie with the Russians, and he is marvelous. He has cornered the market on Russian sables.

The late Brian Dennehy is also in the film in a small role, but with top billing as a New York cop doing an investigation off-duty in Moscow. He too is wonderful to behold.

As for the drudgery of Moscow with its 1970s cheap cars and unpleasant milieu, it’s all part of the flavor you can’t find anywhere else. But this is not Agatha Christie in the Kremlin, not even close.

Though some called the movie boring, its Moscow setting is dreary and mostly downbeat and dim-witted.