Third-Eye Spies: Remote Viewers

DATELINE: Alphabet Soup, NSA, CIA, DIA, KGB

The CIA declassified 70,000 top secret items recently on its 25-year program on Remote Viewing. Third Eye Spiesis a documentary film about a controversial subject, even today, let alone the 1970s.

After it was learned that the Soviets were actively seeking a psychic weapon in the Cold War arsenal as a 1970s spy mission, to create an bureau of paranormal viewers who could “see” anyplace in the world that was needed to give reports to the United States. The CIA, at first, merely wanted to discredit the subject, but found it could not.

There is more than ideomotor at work in the universe, Horatio.

Jimmy Carter, then president in 1979, learned of one psychic who located a missing plane that the Air Force recon could not find. She gave latitudes and longitude to its exact location. It convinced everyone.

Before that, a group of physicists (Russell Targ, Pat Price, Kit Green, and Ingo Swann) were members of Sanford Research Institute, the foremost research group in the country. They kept their autonomy and refused to join MK-Ultra, the CIA LSD program of the era.

Their experiments had to be kept secret for fear that government funding would be ceased if such a “crackpot” notion were to become known in Congress.

No one dares to speak the name “séance” because it would have sent chills into the program and ended any serious study of parapsychology. But what you had was a group of gifted people conducting seances (without contacting dead people), at least for the record.

Swann, a gay man, was the purest of all the psychics and mediums. Not only was he a painter of mystical art works, but he could look anywhere in the universe. He reported there were rings around Jupiter years before they were discovered. It is called paraphysics nowadays—that there are rules of universal and natural law that are trans-dimensional.

Dr. Pat Price, the best of the clairvoyants, died under mysterious circumstance in Las Vegas in 1975, but it was swept under the rug: surprise. He was able to find Patty Hearst when the FBI came to him—and two years after his death, they learned that he had described a Soviet nuclear device to shoot down American satellites.

One of their contacts at CIA was often referred to as the American Mengele, Dr. Sid Gottlieb who ran the most covert LSD and medical experiments then done. And, surprise of surprises, Uri Geller, famous entertainer, worked as a double-agent for several governments, providing literal insights.

This film cannot be viewed normally, as it is clear that disinformation and discredit is heaped everywhere by former KGB agents and the CIA, which have reason to obfuscate the results. In the United States, Robert Gates leads the big bonehead opposition. On the other hand, mystical astronaut Edgar Mitchell found answers in new perspectives.

Once again, we have a look at a paranormal, or paraphysical world, that fails to take into consideration communicate with trans-dimensional beings, whether they are space aliens, or dead people.

Remote Viewing has enough problems without tying its wagon to seance.

 

 

 

 

 

One Hour on the Decks of Titanic!

DATELINE: Seance on a Saturday PM

carol and orb Kadrolsha with orb (Richard?) next to bookrack!

When your home is haunted by one of the victims of the Titanic, and you are on a first-name basis with that spirit, you may find yourself engaged in strange activities.

So, we came to have a séance on a Saturday afternoon that would try to reach Richard White, a 21-year old college student who died on April 15, 1912. He has been following me for some time, and he was likely responsible for my discovery of his old family estate not far from his grave.

On an August day, we finally arranged the first séance to reach him. Like Arthur Conan Doyle or W.T. Stead, notable 19th century spiritualists, we were about to embark on a great adventure.

To help with this was foremost spiritualist and healer, Kadrolsha Ona Carole, who is known professionally as the Queen of the Paranormal.

Also to join us in my study were long-time ghost hunters Susan Allen, Karen Raymond, and Eric Metzler. They have visited my home often and helped me communicate with the spirits around me. Primarily, this is Richard, a student with a penchant for spending time with a retired professor: Dr. William Russo.

The Queen of Paranormal told us we would conduct a professional investigation, not the usual hand-holding, table-tipping that often occurs in Hollywood movies.

As a first timer, I had a bit of nerves: we set up an antique round table for five, each with a white candle on a red tablecloth. There would be sage to cleanse the air and block out the entrances. There would be bread, home-made, natural.

Our contact, Kadrolsha is fairly active in media—with graphic novels, TV and movie tie-ins. She is a stunning blond woman, tall and with a healer’s kindness. She did not engage in fancy chants to set us up: but did a silent prayer and touched each of us on the head to open up.

Many times I had told Richard through divining rods that I did not want to see him on Titanic and felt he was cheated by life. So, I felt some protection. Only later did we find an orb in a corner photo of our session. My belief is that Richard stood next to a bookrack where my work Chess-Mate from Titanic detailed his life.

What happened shocked me, and it was unexpected: we felt the rock of ship in distress. Many of us were freezing cold and shaking to and fro. I was actually warm, and grew flush, but Eric was profusely sweating and overheated: it was a description that survivors gave of Richard’s father who seemed to suffer a heart attack on deck.

As for me, I felt my hands and arms involuntarily raising off my lap—as if buoyant by water. Yet, I was never cold, but in a stunned state at the reactions of the others at our little circular table.

Our hostess, Kadrolsha also felt choked with heart pains—but Sue was most affected, having visions of a woman forced to separate from her husband who was not allowed on the lifeboat.

Her panic grew exponentially and consoling her was nearly impossible. Kadrolsha recognized this, and she brought us back after a harrowing hour aboard a sinking luxury liner.

This experience lasted an hour, though it felt much quicker and sudden. Once the spell was broken, we felt a great relief: recordings taken will document the time aboard the ship at our table.

Should we try this again? I am wary: for a day after I suffered paranormal hangover, tired and headachey. No bad spirits took up residence in my home, thanks to Richard. Yet, I never again want to be on a Titanic deck, even in a hypnotic trance of a séance.

Dr. William Russo has written three books on his Titanic connections:  Tales of a Titanic Family, Chess-mate from Titanic, and Titanic Mysteries on Mill Circle. All are available on Amazon.com in print and in ebook format.

 

 

 

Titanic 2 in the News

DATELINE:  Now, Voyager!

Percival on Titanic deck Percival White, Titanic deck, 1912.

Another billionaire is challenging the world with his money.

This time it is an Australian known as Clive Palmer who decided in 2012, on the 100th anniversary, to build a duplicate of the original unsinkable catastrophe, Titanic, and let it set sail under the Blue Flag Liners.

Delays can never be put aside, but the latest press releases are touting the ship as nearly ready to go out to sea in 2022. The ship will leave from Dubai for New York.

It may be an expensive voyage: first-class compartments may go for $100,000 for a few days of fun. The former owner of our home was one of the victims in 1912: Richard White died on Titanic as his college graduation present went awry.

Now Mr. Palmer plans to honor victims like Richard with an expensive, but safe, re-enactment. The ship is scheduled to sail right over the sunken wreck of the original ship, which should irritate enough paranormal spirits to evoke more than a few chills aboard Titanic 2.

This one will be modern, with plenty of lifeboats, and such unheard of items as wi-fi, tv, and re-enforced hulls. The lower decks where the hoi polloi will bunk for about $500 to $900 will be completely contemporary. The replicas start with D-deck.

The upper segments will be totally copied from original with restaurants, menus, and bistro areas, in ship-shape a la 1912.

We might be willing to go along for the trip and offer the passengers (about 2000) and crew (about 900) a lesson in history. As we have three books about Titanic and lecture on college campuses in New England, we could be persuaded to give a series of presentations aboard Titanic 2, to prove that the trip is meant to honor the victims, not to cash in on their tragedy. By providing historical background through an academic lecture, this will negate charges of “classless” cashing in that some news reports circulated.

If Mr. Palmer or ranker.com or AVIC wants to call on this expertise to fend off paranormal anger, we are ready and willing to discuss premonitions in 1912 of disaster and post-sunken spirit visits from various victims.

But, for heaven’s sake, don’t call us “a re-enactor.”

Dr. William Russo, Professor Emeritus, is author of three books on Titanic, including a paranormal history. He regularly presents and lectures around New England colleges on the topic. He is available to join the Titanic II voyage! His books include Tales of a Titanic Family, Chess-Mate from Titanic, and recently, Titanic Mysteries on Mill Circle. Percival White was born and lived at Mill Circle.

Titanic Mysteries on Mill Circle

DATELINE:   Paranormal Book on Titanic!

new kindle mystery cover Richard White (picture from college yearbook).

When you live in a haunted house and create an enchanted library, you may end up with some paranormal mysteries to explain.

That is the premise of William Russo’s latest book about the spirit of a Titanic victim who shows his host both devotion and protection.

You may question why a college student who died on the Titanic would follow a retired college professor, but the overriding sense of being haunted is not demonic according to a new book about Titanic Mysteries on Mill Circle.

Psychics hint that there may be a reincarnation involved, or merely crossed wires of time and space. Whatever the cause, the effect is exhilarating:  messages and orbs fly all over the library. Russo’s path to his spirit guest crossed the lines of attending the same high school, but fifty years apart, and being members of the school chess team.

Whether you can accept DVDs thrown off shelves and other bizarre coincidences as regular daily activity, there is something definitely happening beyond normal. 

Dr. William Russo often contends that where he lives, the normal is paranormal. You may become convinced along with him.

A long-time skeptic of occult and paranormal, Russo cannot fight the barrage of evidence in his own home’s library that he has now turned over to a victim of the Titanic.

Richard Frazar White has taken up residence here and happily accepts his library as a gift. When he was a young man in 1912, he was a budding intellectual who spent time at his Aunt Julia’s library at Waikiki (the largest private library on the Hawaiian Islands in 1900). He is photographed, at the end of his life, two days before Titanic sinks, in the First-Class Reading Room of the grand ship.

And now, he has taken possession of a memorial library dedicated to him. Included in the volume are the weird anecdotes about Richard White’s ties to the art world, how Russo found Richard’s 1912 Bowdoin Bugle Yearbook, and how the orbs and noises of the library respond to his every request.

Other haunted people contact him with their own tales of connections to Richard, including a young lawyer from Brazil who was an exchange student at Bowdoin.

You may not believe it, but you cannot turn away from this page-turner.

Now available in soft-cover and e-book format on Amazon. Titanic Mysteries on Mill Circle is the final volume of the Mill Circle series, and the third volume of the continuing tales of the Titanic by the author!

William Russo’s other works include: Tales of a Titanic Family, Chess-Mate from Titanic.    Dr. Russo will teach a course on Titanic: a Local History at the CALL Program at Keene State College in the Fall term. He also will give a guest lecture at Monty Tech Continuing Education program in Fitchburg, MA, in October.

Truly Miss Marple: Rutherford Murders?

DATELINE:  Murder Most Foul!

Dames Margaret & Agatha

Dames Margaret Rutherford & Agatha Christie!

A little British documentary about character actress Margaret Rutherford is shocking, surprising, and ultimately saddening. If you have forgotten her dotty old ladies, she was the first movie Miss Marple.

The film has the overwhelming title: Truly Miss Marple: the Curious Case of Margaret Rutherford. The actress died in 1972 after a rapid decline in health at the height of her popularity

Agatha Christie was appalled at the folly of turning her aged detective into an eccentric comic actress, but they later enjoyed each other—to the degree that Christie dedicated The Mirror Crack’d to Rutherford.

Her acting career did not fully reach success until after age 40: she was always the costar, whether it was for John Gielgud or Edith Evans. When success came, she played old ladies who were NOT battle-axes. It was an unkind comment by interviewers. Dame Margaret was always a gentle figure of fun.

Her biggest break came with Noel Coward in Blithe Spirit, a role she almost refused because she thought it might demean spiritualists (as she was a believer).

Her indomitable English grand dames gave way in old age to the Christie character, though Margaret hated the word “Murder” in the titles of the four grand Miss Marple movies. There was a reason for her sensitivity: her father murdered her grandfather, and later, likely as a result, her mother committed suicide.

Yet, Rutherford herself was the ultimate woman of kind hearts and coronets. If there was a downside, it was her growing periods of depression. It was a losing battle, especially when dementia added to her woes.

She briefly went to Hollywood with Burton and Taylor in The VIPs and won an Oscar as a supporting actress. The Oscar disappeared after her death, stolen and on the black market, sold by a conniving housekeeper.

Miss Marple’s little murder mystery movies remain delightful, owing to Rutherford’s charismatic personality.

 

Ghosts of Mill Circle

chessmate plays

Mill Circle Tours of a Haunted Neighborhood where Paranormal is Normal

For many years, people interested in paranormal and spirits have asked to visit my home on Mill Circle. There, we have experienced many spirits, including Richard who was born in Winchendon Springs and died on the Titanic in 1912. His presence has served as my guardian and protector. Some psychic visitors have insisted that we knew each other in a previous life, or that I am a reincarnation. Richard’s body was recovered several days after his drowning, and he is buried a mile away at Riverside Cemetery. Whatever is happening, it is mysterious and fascinating. Now I am ready to share my connection to another plane with visitors to Mill Circle.

 

Highly Qualified Educator & Tour Guide

Your host and tour guide is a former college professor, Dr. William Russo, from Curry College in MIlton, MA. There for thirty years he taught a variety of writing and film courses, including Ghosts in Film and Literature.

Dr. Russo noticed in 1980 that one of the classrooms where he held his lectures contained a plaque dedicated to the heroism of a Titanic victim named Richard White. He learned a few details, but not much else. No one could explain why the plaque was there (from the 1950s when the school was used as a private Catholic school). He knew only that the victim was a 21-year old traveling first-class with his wealthy businessman father.

With an interest in Titanic history, he was shocked to learn that the house he purchased for retirement was once owned by the Titanic victims. Then,  he discovered strange activities in the house. He learned that Richard was born here and was buried nearby.

Psychics visited the house on several occasions. Three told him Richard was present, was happy that Dr. Russo had moved here, and wanted to play chess with him.

Soon thereafter, chess pieces on a board in the library began to move on their own. Inexplicably.

Russo studied the local history and wrote several books on Richard and his family. These include Tales of a Titanic Family,  Haunting near Virtuous Spring, and Chess-Mate From Titanic.

Tours expect to commence in May.

If you wish to visit Mill Circle and have a private tour, you should email  wrusso@curry.edu to make arrangements. Cost is $50 per person, and a complimentary book will be given. Accepting the tour conditions is required

 

Hours

Sunday afternoon at 2pm to 3:30 pm

Saturday – evening at 7pm to 8:30pm

other times may be added.

Tours include a walk around Mill Circle (weather permitting) and time in the library and upstairs of the private residence where psychics insist a spirit vortex can be found.

Ghost Chessmate Plays on a Dusty Board

DATELINE:  Titanic Ghost Still Present at His Home

chessmate plays Titanic Spirit Plays On!

Eight months ago, after psychics who visited noted that the ghostly spirit of a young man at Mill Circle wanted to play chess, we offered to keep you updated.

So, here is the first: Saturday afternoon, entering my second floor office, a small place where all blogs are created, we were greeted with a scene of chess movement. The ultimate gesture: the White King was down, a sign in the game of a concession.

It is a humorous response to make one’s first move the endgame gambit.

The chessboard has collected dust, never touched all this time, under the photo of the young man whom we were told was the potential player. He loved to play chess, often with his brother in this neighborhood.

At age 21 Richard White died in 1912 on the Titanic.

He was born and lived at this property, which was the family estate, the headquarters to their 19th century mill empire.  When his body was recovered a few days after the Titanic sinking, he was brought to the Winchendon Springs cemetery a mile away and buried alone. His father’s body was never recovered.

For over thirty years odd encounters with everything Titanic perplexed me.  This has included purchasing a property where Richard White lived. We had no idea at the time, but quickly learned from neighbors that conditions at Mill Circle were paranormal, not abnormal.

Richard sent a variety of signs he was here, present in this home, where he was welcomed. Where else would he go? Where else might he want to be? Psychics told me that he felt safe here in my home.

Psychics said he chose to stay here, and as a free spirit could go anywhere.

When the chessboard in the library featured odd moves and inexplicable actions, we set up another board where I could keep an eye on it daily, telling Richard that he could play the author of The Ghosts of Mill Circle right here.

It seems he has taken up the offer.

We placed a small model of the Titanic in mid-board, partly as a totem, and a yellow rose rests near the board as a symbol of friendship.

And, from a dimension where time is timeless, he has given us another sign, albeit a funny one by conceding the game in his first move.

We love it, Richard, and appreciate your presence.

Arthur & George, Another Sherlock Team

DATELINE:  Redoubtable Arthur!

Arthur Clunes as Doyle.

Julian Barnes, the noteworthy novelist, wrote his story about Arthur Conan Doyle and his real-life attempt to solve a crime about an Indian solicitor in England who was falsely convicted of animal mutilation, mainly because of racial hatred and class prejudice.

Arthur & George is a strange misleading title for a story in which Dr. Doyle showed his deductive reasoning to illustrate who really were the brains behind Sherlock. If you don’t know ahead of time, the title might lead to some bad book judging from the cover alone. Of course, that was Julian Barnes’ motive.

Julian Barnes in his original novel did not let on who the two men were until the story was well underway. That is completely lost in the movie version, which plays on the connection between Doyle and Holmes.

There has been in recent years a spate of this biographical tales dramatized about the author/spiritualist/doctor.

The BBC drama has all the top-notch production values and impressive acting you might expect of Masterpiece Theatre. The film is three parts of 45 minutes, probably could have been a one-shot film.

Martin Clunes is all you would ask for in a Conan Doyle figure, which contrasts greatly with the Watson figure of Charles Edwards—as Woody, Doyle’s servant.

Indeed, Edwards played Doyle a decade earlier and was miscast, especially against the grand Ian Richardson as Dr. Joseph Bell, his mentor and medical professor in the series Murder Rooms.

Also in this miniseries is Art Malik, the last of the stars of the granddaddy of epic series, the Jewel in the Crown. He plays a minister from India who is the object of prejudice and small-minded hate in a rural English shire. His victim son is George (Arsher Ali), a myopic limping solicitor.

These semi-true stories fit perfectly into the Holmes canon. And, Clunes as Doyle/Holmes features all the brilliant logic and bombast of his literary figure. This Doyle is more active and physical than Holmes, but he fits the tale perfectly.

 

 

 

 

 

Dangerous Edge: Greene for Danger

DATELINE:  Literary Marvel

Greene  The Other Shade of Greene

Before Graham Greene was known as a Native American actor and movie star, he was one of the most important writers of the 20th century.  Oh, they were different people with the same name.

British writer Greene joined Hemingway as a character as vivid as his heroes of fiction. Like them, he was a converted Roman Catholic with severe doubts and moral lapses. He was, like them, often a writer and journalist, and he shared a background as a spy with many of his literary heroes. He was not a nice man.

And he loved to write movie reviews. Well, he wasn’t all bad.

As a cinematic novelist, his works often reached the screen with great influence: from This Gun for Hire, The Third Man,  Power and Glory, The Comedians, Our Man in Havana, Brighton Rock, The Quiet American, Travels with my Aunt, and on and on.

He seemed always to visit a far-off location right before it blew up into an international crisis spot: from Cuba to Haiti to Vietnam.

As a boy, his father was the headmaster of their school—and all his classmates regarded him as a spy for the old man. The notion stuck.

He was notoriously promiscuous and a womanizer, as well as an inveterate traveler. He was virulently anti-American for the most part—and loathed the movies that messed up his message (Quiet American Audie Murphy comes to mind, which can be seen in the book Audie Murphy in Vietnam by William Russo).

He defended notorious Communist Kim Philby, the Brit spy, and one of his closest friends. He accepted honors from the Soviet Union, but not from the Nobel Prize committee. No wonder the FBI and CIA kept him under surveillance.

Greene was also a suicidal manic-depressive most of the time, though he lived until his 80s and finally came to realize his mission was to write. He believed his work ultimately was his life and his identity. He was not far wrong.

The documentary about his life, Dangerous Edge, even features people like John LeCarre, his likely successor in literature, and the film uses many clips from the famous movies. He used to call his less serious work “entertainments,” but it all ended up as serious and entertaining.

Who Killed Dorothy Kilgallen?

DATELINE: The Reporter Who Knew Too Much

Killed Kilgallen? Heroic Woman Ignored Again!

This week is the 55th anniversary of the death of John F. Kennedy in Dallas in 1963, which began a cascading of bad events and cultural deterioration in America.

One of the forgotten victims and researchers from the earliest conspiracy days of the Kennedy Assassination was a muckraking journalist named Dorothy Kilgallen. She was a Broadway gossip columnist and star of the TV game show called What’s My Line, which probably contributed to a sexist dismissal of her work.

In November of 1965, she was found dead in her luxury New York apartment—and her ground-breaking research and manuscript was missing. She had interviewed Jack Ruby privately twice and was preparing a second trip to New Orleans

Her death was suspicious, but not investigated by police. Author Mark Shaw’s original book on the subject, The Reporter Who Knew Too Much, spends half the work on her biography—and the second half of the book on lining up suspects and trying to determine what she had uncovered. Many people are still burying her research.

There is no cooperation from Kilgallen’s three children, for some unknown reason. Shaw’s work is thorough and compelling, all the moreso because most “serious” books on the assassination of President Kennedy ignore her mysterious death and hard work.

Kilgallen’s enemies were numerous, as might befit a gossip columnist with a poisonous style of indictment. Frank Sinatra and J. Edgar Hoover loathed her. She knew many of the mobsters who were enemies of the Kennedy family and felt betrayed by patriarch Joe and brother Robert.

Shaw loves Kilgallen even more than her family and is intent on restoring her value and importance in history. If she indeed was a murder victim who came too close to the truth in the early days of conspiracy theory, then she needs to be recognized as a pioneer of the truth-seekers.

It is a fascinating story told by Mark Shaw, though you will suffer the bane of murder mystery: she was not able to identify the culprits before her untimely death–and neither is author Shaw.

 

Shooting Tut

DATELINE: First Photographer

Burton's Boy King

Harry Burton’s Colorized Boy King!

Howard Carter traveled and lectured using Harry Burton’s hand-colored glass plate photos from 1923 taken at the Valley of the Kings. Most of Burton’s photos, seldom seen, are brilliantly set up and lighted like a Vermeer.

Back in the days when it was politically incorrect, King Tutankhamun was known as Old King Tut. We doubt anyone knew any name except the nickname.

The Man Who Shot King Tutankhamun is an intriguing depiction of the picture man who shot with a camera.

The man who went with Howard Carter to document with stunning photos was named Harry Burton, largely forgotten figure behind the camera.

His photos were done on glass plates in the difficult conditions of the tomb, yet he composed them like one of the Great Masters.

A little documentary tries to give him credit, but he has hidden in the shadows for so long that he may be hard to find.

In this overview, the son of a blue-collar carpenter in England made his own fate at age 16 by hooking up with a wealthy art patron. He became a teenage travel companion and moved to the art circles of Florence, Italy, where he encountered the upper-crust and the wealthy. He made his lot with them, teaching himself photography and becoming an amateur archaeologist and assistant to the check writers of research.

Whether Burton was gay or not may be unresolved, or whether he merely found it an opportunistic means to climb the social ladder, he managed to enhance his innate talents in photography.

His glass plates were pristine, beautiful set-ups of the dig sites and discoveries. Using light determinations that had to be done by sense, not instrument, he created stunning images.

He managed to make a long-term association with the irascible Howard Carter, providing him with the fame from pictures of him with King Tut’s mummy. Burton remained in Egypt for the rest of his life, ending in 1940, where he became the ultimate expatriate.

 

 

Frankenstein & the Vampyre

DATELINE: Horrors’ Start

Lord Byron  Byronic Vampire?

As one expert notes, these personages in the title are the twin pillars of modern horror—more than a century of monstrous concepts: life coming out of the dead.

A Dark and Stormy Night  is the subtitle of this intriguing documentary that uses the words of five people thrown together at Villa Diodati in 1816. This illustrious group of young bohemians of the era included two immortal poets, Shelly and Byron, their paramours, and their young doctor.

For those without a proper literary historical perspective, Lord Byron challenged his housemates one stormy night to write a ghost story. They had the summer without light, as it was called, to do it.  In the United States, it was called “the year without summer.”

Switzerland and the world suffered in 1816 from a year without proper summer: crops failed, storms cascaded around the Earth because of a super-volcanic explosion in the Pacific. So with a constant barrage of thunderstorms and lighting candles in mid-afternoon, the crew of Mary Shelley, Percy Shelly, Dr. J.M. Polidori (Byron’s travel companion) and Claire (Byron’s latest stalker/groupie) took up the task.

They allegedly urged, critiqued, and drove each other on to come up with a horrifying tale. Mrs. Shelley wrote about the modern Prometheus, Frankenstein, and Dr. Polidori came up with the first elegant, aristocratic vampire that set the mold for Dracula in fifty years.

Some wags believed that Byron wrote the original outline, and Polidori, pretender to the poet, stole it and finished it.

The scandalous summer featured rumors of drugs, sex, and bizarre carrying on, which suited the weirdness of the weather in 1816.

Of course, burning the candle as it were all day and all night, led to an early demise of Polidori in 1821, Shelley in 1822, and Byron in 1824.  Mary Shelley lived to see her story take on a life in literature—and years later realized she had survived the ghosts of Diodati.

Fascinating documentary with earnest re-enactors, trying to avoid their sexual peccadilloes. It seems almost preposterous that those so young could produce such masterpieces of literature.

It’s a story worth watching.

Aaron Hernandez Back in the News

DATELINE: Out, Out, Damned Spot!

A1 steak

While Tom Brady and the New England Patriots pulled another game out of the hopper in the last second, the news was not all good. The Boston Globe featured an interview with another gay lover of the late Aaron Hernandez.

Yes, the paramours of alleged and former murdering tight end of the Patriots are coming out of the woodwork. Had he not been indicted for multiple murders, Aaron Hernandez might have been on the receiving end of Tom Brady’s passes this past night, instead of Gronk and Julian Edelman.

Instead, we are treated to more salacious details of his affair with his high school sweetheart, the quarterback of the Bristol, Connecticut, football team. Aaron had a thing for QBs, which explains his trips to California to train with Tom Brady years ago.

Of course, nowadays, Tom has no memory of the name Hernandez and never breathes it in polite company or even to the media.

Several years ago, during the trials of Hernandez, we were a lone voice in the wilderness, pointing out that the police covered up the gay angle to the crimes—believing it did not serve the public to hear it.

And, of course, the prosecutors declined to go into the gay motive in the murders because they thought the public would never find an NFL player capable of being homoerotic behavior, let alone homicidal behavior.

If you want to read the dirt, unvarnished and uncovered, go to the either the print or ebook entitled The Strange Case of Aaron Hernandez, available on Amazon.

 

 

Sherlock v. Conan Doyle: Battle Royale

DATELINE: Who Hates Sherlock Holmes? The Author

doyle

If ever there was a legendary love/hate relationship, it was between Sherlock Holmes and the man who was his spiritual father and creator, Arthur Conan Doyle.

In a French documentary called Sherlock Holmes Against Conan Doyle, we have a battle on the order of a duel with the Napoleon of Crime and the Actors Who Took Him On.

Meant to be a money-making enterprise and a throwaway for a couple of stories, Holmes turned into Doyle’s Frankenstein Monster.

A marvelous and entertaining documentary gives us a blow-by-blow description of Doyle’s losing war with his temperamental genius/consulting detective.

You know who will win this fight. Holmes has survived with hundreds of movies and TV shows, depicted by a variety of actors with waspy disdain—from Rathbone to Jeremy Brett, to the modern versions like Cumberbatch. Thankfully, we never see Robert Downey in the role.

The little hour is chock full of clips of these Sherlocks making annotations on Conan Doyle, a man of some adventure and style himself. Often thought as a Watson type, Doyle was actually more of a Professor Challenger sort.

Killing Holmes was frowned upon even by Doyle’s mother, and money is the great resurrection device. After ten years, Doyle was forced to bring him back from the dead.

Based on an old professor who used to wow the med students with his erudition, Holmes was a clever creation who was enhanced by his narrative fellow, long-suffering and frequent punching bag named Dr. John H. Watson.

If you want to see fleeting glimpses of many classic Holmes portrayals, and rare clips of Doyle, you may enjoy the time, though it covers familiar territory.

 

New Book Vindicates Ossurworld…Again

DATELINE: Aaron Hernandez Revisited

Laughing Cavalier

When given the choice between staying silent or beating a dead horse, you know what side we fall on.

Once again, vindication and bragging seem to have paired up in our blog. We were an early source to call out and simply out Aaron Hernandez, New England’s Billy the Kid cum Jack the Ripper.

Now his common-law wife has written the introduction to lawyer Jose Baez’s new book on Hernandez:  in it, she admits that Aaron likely maintained a secret gay life. He also wrote a suicide note to his prison gay lover. And more.

Other tawdry revelations likely will follow.

Of course, even in liberal Massachusetts, prosecution teams would not go forth with the gay angle for murder motives. We went there, tastelessly and fearlessly, during earliest moments of the trial of Hernandez.

Police felt investigating a gay lifestyle of an NFL player would boomerang against the case: jurors and NFL fans would never accept that notion about one of their gladiators of the gridiron. Backlash even hit us.

Never let it be said that “gladis” is a Latin term popular in gay circles way back when gladiators roamed the athletic arenas.

So, what comfort do we take from our book The Strange Case of Aaron Hernandez? Not much. Mostly we take royalties as it continues to sell.

In our book and original blog entries, we took the tone of outright indignation over his crimes: revealed that he led one victim to a sexual tryst that turned into a shooting a mile from Hernandez’s home at 3am. What does it all come-down to now? A cheap TV movie? Sensational  books by lawyers and hack journalists (such as we are)? Fake news?

It’s all info-tainment. We used to say that our professorial lectures in college classrooms were nothing more than an exercise in edu-tainment. And blogs are merely the tease, as performed by any self-disrespecting fool or cheap-shot blogger.

We stand by our book on Hernandez. It depicts what is akin to what passes for truth nowadays when Rudi Giuliani tells us that truth is not necessarily truth.