Westworld 3.6, Serac, See Rac Run

DATELINE: Breaking with Pinky 

 Williams 1 & 2

We doubt the series can recover its equilibrium now that it is on a path where everyone is a host and no one is a guest. Robots, Robots, everywhere, and not a human to be entertained.

Jonathan Nolan’s Futureworld took a couple of steps deeper into the abyss of bleakness, and it ain’t pretty, no matter how clean the future streets are looking. That in itself is a tip-off that what’s real may not be what you see.

This episode is called “Decoherence,” which apparently indicates the series is now a step away from incoherence.

If there is redemption in this episode, it can be found in the group therapy session of William (Ed Harris). Now committed to a mental institution, his hallucinogenic therapy includes a hilarious session with all aspects of his past self: boy, young man, man in black, business tycoon, and mental patient.

This allows Jimmi Simpson to return for one bravura recap as his character of William. It leads to cynical villain William realizing he is indeed the hero of his own life.

As far as Ed Harris is concerned, he is not happy with the role and its turn of events. He signed on to play the Man in Black—and he may bail on the series if it continues. He was so unhappy that he broke Jimmi Simpson’s finger in their big fight scene.

The other major development that may turn into an interesting plot maneuver is the alteration of Tessa Thompson’s Charlotte who had begun to identify with the human side more than ever. Once crossed, and crossing that threshold, she may become a woman scorned: truly more dangerous than Maeve.

What may be converging here is a means to save Westworld from sure destruction on several sides. What it ultimately changes into could set us up for another season, or a neat ending to the proceedings.