Oswald Revisited Again

DATELINE: Marrs’ Crossed Fire & Russo’s Booth/Oswald

Jim Marrs is best known as an alternative historian. His finger seems to be in every pie from Ancient Aliens to gold as an elixir of life, and now and then he pulls out a plum. He is about as reliable as The Farmer’s Almanac in the eyes of many.

So it is with Crossfire: The Plot That Killed Kennedy.  This short, highly charged film is based on his book, but more direct and chock full of interesting tidbits seldom considered or seen by conspiracy enthusiasts.

Simply directed by J. Michael Long, Marrs sits at his desk and lectures with appropriate and intriguing evidence, pictures and film clips, to make his point that much evidence has been altered, obfuscated, and falsified.

All these felonies have been given a bum’s rush by officials who want to cover up the 1963 coup d’etat that Marrs insists occurred.

The documentary goes hard into proving Oswald was a patsy, had a double, and was victimized by Lyndon Johnson and J. Edgar Hoover. It’s heady stuff, but rough handling of the law made it easier.

Of course, many people will dismiss the fake news—though it’s becoming harder to determine who exactly faked the news. And which news is fake.

In our book of a few years back, Booth & Oswald, we did not examine their assassinations, but their educations and childhoods to discern if they were products of their learning curve.  We found Oswald less capable of working in tandem with anyone than the gregarious Booth, and more likely to make arrogant, poor decisions to his own detriment.

If Marrs is correct, when the government is out to get you, and the media is putty, your niche in history is guaranteed to be out of your own hands.

This movie is a disturbing look at the twists or turns of justice and injustice.

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